February 22, 2013

"The babies who nap in sub-zero temperatures."

"Nowadays most day-care centres in Sweden put children outside to rest. It's common to see rows of prams lined up in the snow at nap-time, with youngsters fast asleep inside."
"When the temperature drops to -15C (5F) we always cover the prams with blankets," says head teacher Brittmarie Carlzon.
Oh! Sub-zero centigrade. It's not that cold!
"Babies clearly slept longer outdoors than indoors," says Marjo Tourula. While indoor naps lasted between one and two hours, outdoor naps lasted from 1.5 to three hours.

"Probably the restriction of movements by clothing could increase the length of sleep, and a cold environment makes swaddling possible without overheating," she says.

28 comments:

MayBee said...

The babies have probably gone into hibernation.

Bob said...

Saw that during my brief sojourn in Iceland. The mothers there, like their Swedish cousins, also leave the baby carriage outside the front door of a friend's house.

I also seem to recall a case of a Scandinavian woman visiting friends in NYC that got in huge trouble over this practice, about 20 years ago.

EDH said...

"When the temperature drops to -15C (5F) we always cover the prams with blankets," says head teacher Brittmarie Carlzon.

What does that do to CO2 levels?

Paul said...

I bet it has to do with FREASH AIR! That might make anyone sleep better.

wyo sis said...

I prefer to sleep covered warmly in a cold room. This clearly doesn't hurt the babies. They're healthy. Doctors tell you to take babies out in the cold night air when they have croup. It always worked for us.

Lem said...

I also seem to recall a case of a Scandinavian woman visiting friends in NYC that got in huge trouble over this practice, about 20 years ago.

I remember that... she was accused of abandoning the baby... it never occurred to the mother that someone might take the baby.

Culture shock

virgil xenophon said...

With you ll the way about sleeping covered in cold rooms, wyo sis! And, yes, Bob, I DO remember that story--I think it involved a restaurant where she parked the pram just outside the window where she was sitting..

AprilApple said...

Hibernation and or death would make a nap longer, for sure.

Shouting Thomas said...

This practice is meant to prepare the babies for their adult interactions with frigid Swedish women in the emotional tundra of one of the great capitals of feminism.

You might as well hug an ice cube. Given the choice between Swedish women and going gay, even I would choose gaydom.

The boys must learn to cease peeing standing up. To completely pacify the biddies, he'd be well advised to cut the damned thing off.

Remind me never to visit this country. I'll take my vacation in the Philippines or Thailand.

Ann Althouse said...

We have the thermostat programmed to 50° at night and strangely enough, I feel unusually warm and that's with a lightweight comforter. I had to put away the heavyweight comforter, which seemed too hot, when it wasn't too hot when the thermostat was set higher. The body generates its own heat.

Question what relationship this all has to getting fat/keeping thin.

Bob said...

Here's the story, it happened to a Danish woman in 1997 (and a Swedish woman in 2011):

http://www.nytimes.com/1997/05/15/nyregion/danish-mother-is-reunited-with-her-baby.html

Mitchell the Bat said...

The experience will serve them well on the trip to Jupiter.

Ann Althouse said...

@Bob I thought about that too when I saw the photo (at the article I linked) with the baby carriages outside a café, presenting it as the norm in Sweden, as something good. That very thing can get you arrested in NY.

This is one reason never to leave your home country. How do you know what's right and wrong?

Jane said...

Question: If the babies are all outside and the moms are inside, just how do they know that the kid has woken up from naptime?

ganderson said...

Two summers ago a Swedish woman in Amherst, MA was questioned by the police for leaving her baby outside when she went in to get a burrito. I don't believe she was arrested, but child services got involved.

Amexpat said...

It's common here in Norway to let infants nap outside during the winter. One of the reasons given is that the air outside is better than the stale, heated air inside. I haven't heard of any downside.

edutcher said...

The newest Lefty thing - post partum abortion.

Actually, George Catlin noted a great many Indian tribes let the kids (including babies) run around naked in the Plains winter with no apparent harm.

edutcher said...

Ann Althouse said...

We have the thermostat programmed to 50° at night and strangely enough, I feel unusually warm and that's with a lightweight comforter. I had to put away the heavyweight comforter, which seemed too hot, when it wasn't too hot when the thermostat was set higher. The body generates its own heat.

How heavy the nightie (if it isn't prying)?

Flannel keeps out a lot of chill.

elkh1 said...

Jane said...
Question: If the babies are all outside and the moms are inside, just how do they know that the kid has woken up from naptime?

They don't want to know, and they don't know. The babes cry themselves back to sleep, giving their little lungs a thorough exercise. Thus, sleep about twice as long.

When greenie's solar cells get buried under tons of snow, the wind turbines get stuck, wood burning produces too much carbon dioxide, coal and gas are outlaw by our most exalted president, we will sleep in the cold. Might as well prepare.

ad hoc said...

Like wyo sis, sleeping well-covered in a cold room is the way to go. I find that the air is less stuffy (maybe less dry).

Amartel said...

I guess the goal is to keep the kids unconcious for as long as possible?

carrie said...

So do the longer naps benefit the babies or the day care workers?

carrie said...

So do the longer naps benefit the babies or the day care workers?

Erika said...

Edutcher, bless your heart, don't ask Althouse about her nightwear. Your raging crush on her is transparent and a little creepy.

Erika said...

Thinking that maybe if you hear it from both me and Inga it might sink in.

Pettifogger said...

Cultural norms vary. I grew up in Corpus Christi, Texas, and I saw snow only one time during all those years. Because I remember the house we lived in, I know it was before I was in first grade.

The snow did not stick to the ground, but a little bit accumulated in the gutter. My mother would not let me go outside because, in her view, it was too cold. So she went out with a spoon and brought back in a little snow so I would know what it looked like.

That's the only snow I saw until I went to college. Of course, until I went to college, I also never saw a creek with water in it (putting aside tidewater).

edutcher said...

Erika said...

Edutcher, bless your heart, don't ask Althouse about her nightwear. Your raging crush on her is transparent and a little creepy.

No crush, but a light comforter and a heavy nightgown is similar to a heavy comforter and a light nightie in its effect.

We had a morning here while the Blonde was gone where it was 54 inside (I thought something had gone wrong with the heater, we usually keep it at 60 or so during the night), but I don't wear a lot to bed.

I was freezing (the pups agreed).

I'm just asking a reasonable question about Ann's contention.

PS How come nobody notices all the times I disagree with her?

Not to mention the times, when she rebukes me, I answer her every bit as strongly.

Funny that. Some people took shilol too literally. He's the one that always came back for more abuse.

Bob said...

Once upon a time there was a series of books on how to adapt to a foreign country; I had one titled Culture Shock: UK.

Further back, when I was in the US Navy a couple of the ships I was on, USS Saipan and USS Nassau used to publish "port visit" booklets for any liberty port we entered, giving tips on food/drink, places to avoid, and weird customs to avoid.