February 22, 2013

"In 1511, Diego Velázquez de Cuéllar set out from Hispaniola to form the first Spanish settlement in Cuba..."

"... with orders from Spain to conquer the island. The settlement was at Baracoa, but the new settlers were to be greeted with stiff resistance from the local Taíno population. The Taínos were initially organized by cacique (chieftain) Hatuey, who had himself relocated from Hispaniola to escape the brutalities of Spanish rule on that island. After a prolonged guerrilla campaign, Hatuey and successive chieftains were captured and burnt alive, and within three years the Spanish had gained control of the island. In 1514, a settlement was founded in what was to become Havana."

In Cuba, today's "History of" country.

25 comments:

Bob Ellison said...

Cuba could've been great.

Lauderdale Vet said...

Cuban food: makes the world a better place. Cuban Sandwiches and Mojitos for everyone!

edutcher said...

The Conquistadores did not mess around.

before the Civil war, there were cattle drives to Cuba from Texas and, after it, from Florida.

Bob Ellison said...

Cuba could've been great.

If Andy Jackson had taken it.

ironrailsironweights said...

Snowfall report: on rare instances wet snow has been reported near the summit of Pico Turquino, which is the highest point in Cuba, at 6,470 feet.

Peter

Nichevo said...

How do you have cattle drives to an island? Meanwhile Cuban sandwiches, yay, but what is your favorite recipe?

edutcher said...

Nichevo said...

How do you have cattle drives to an island?

Well, the Floridians drove them to Tampa and the Texicans drove to Nawlins.

Some put them on boats from there.

Craig Landon said...

For the others, the cowboys had kayaks. Some met Davy Jones. Might be where that oil in the Gulf comes from.

Clyde said...

I find it interesting that the current meme on the Left is that "the Pilgrims were illegal immigrants," but compared to the Spaniards, who enslaved the natives to work in their mines and burned rebels alive, they were saints.

kcom said...

What exactly did Castro do differently? It's the same story, with different names. Our founders were some of the greatest men in history. All of theirs suck.

Paco Wové said...

Chief Hatuey, first American rebel, strains forward and glimpses the glorious Cuban revolution in the far future.

Rusty said...

Lauderdale Vet said...
Cuban food: makes the world a better place. Cuban Sandwiches and Mojitos for everyone!

Pork roast with garlic stuffed in slits made in the meat. Crusted with salt and slow roasted. served with fried plantains and christos y moros(black beans and rice).
What my wife's ex mother in law would serve us every time we visited.

Tim said...

Hatuey was the first invader of Cuba after leaving Hispaniola?

Tim said...

Hatuey was the first invader of Cuba after leaving Hispaniola?

Nichevo said...

yes, I think they call that pernil. Recipe please, again. there is a site called something like I like my men like I like my food, cheap and easy.

Oh:

http://www.weareneverfull.com/easy-and-cheap-i-like-my-men-like-i-like-my-food/

I use her high heat recipe and her low heat recipe but I'm not sure I'm getting it. The texture is not quite what I wish. especially on the low heat which I would've expected to be better. also, do you bone your roast or cook it with the bone?

happily it's a versatile cut that pork shoulder, and I had 'm cube it for me bone in all one day, and made a nice pork chili with it, thanks to Chip Ahoy.

Hagar said...

The Spanish came to the Americas following eight centuries of war and civil war in Spain.
Violence and death was the life they knew.

Hagar said...

The Spanish came to the Americas following eight centuries of war and civil war in Spain.
Violence and death was the life they knew.

virgil xenophon said...

"What else is history but the erasure of borders and the disappearence of peoples."

Hagar said...

"Peoples" do not disappear; they just learn to speak different languages.

virgil xenophon said...

@Hagar/

You're half-right. While Individual "people" don't necessarily dissappear (Hitler's ovens & Stalin, Mao & Pol Pots' victims excepted) a "people" quite often does/has as it is subsumed or altered out of recognition by another culture..

Rusty said...

Nichevo said...

She'd slow roast it with the bone in.

Lauderdale Vet said...

I've been experimenting lately ...with the Caja China, braising in the oven, slow-cookers and pressure-cookers. I'm torn, because it's all so tasty. Pressure cookers are so convenient, and they hands down make the best stock.

Brining the pork is definitely is worth it.

Sounds like great stuff, Rusty!

Thanks for the link, Nichevo!

Lauderdale Vet said...

This isn't Cuban, but it's related to delicious pork dishes. It caught my eye recently, and it's on my list of things to experiment with.

How to make Carne Adovada

I especially liked the author's ideas on braising, and how they incorporated the chile.

tiger said...

The sooner than murderer Castro dies - along with his brother various family members and the rest of the thugocracy that POS put in place - the better off the world will be.

tiger said...

Oh! And thanks for the recipes/links!

Much obliged!

Mitch H. said...

"Peoples" do not disappear; they just learn to speak different languages.

Not true of the Arawak elsewhere in the Caribbean. I'm surprised to see references to surviving Tainu in Cuba, in Hispaniola, the rest of the greater Antilles and the Bahamas, their cousins were wiped out to a man. I suppose we see here, again, the aid that high and remote mountainous badlands give lost peoples in maintaining some fragmentary remnant of themselves in the face of complete and total cultural defeat in the open lowlands.

Lowland Cuba, like the rest of the Antilles, was well-known for taking its diseased tax upon would-be conquerors. One of the first international acts of American imperialism, which preceded Constitution, Republic and Revolution alike, was the 1762 siege and capture of Havana by the victorious British colonials, having defeated the French in Canada. They easily took the city and citadel, but then disease took them in their thousands, and the settlement returned Cuba to Bourbon Spain in exchange for other, less costly considerations.