July 25, 2012

"For a few years now, I’ve been drawn toward paying more attention to sabbath observance."

"Though my faith’s expectation of communal worship has always been an important part of my approach to the day, of late I’ve been trying to sort out for myself what more I might want to make a part of my observance. Going to Mass and brunch, calling my family, then jumping right back into ordinary work just hasn’t been cutting it for me. Something’s been missing."

15 comments:

John said...

She seems to have Sabbath (Saturday) and the Lord's Day (Sunday) confused with each other.

John Henry

tim in vermont said...

As I age, a day of rest and contemplation on Sunday gets more and more attractive.

Grandma Bee said...

Jesus said, "The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the sabbath." God gave us the Sabbath as a gift, for refreshment of body and mind and spirit. Whether you believe in God or not, give yourself one day in seven to breathe and recharge your batteries.

ricpic said...

I, I , I, me, me, me, I, I, I. Hey lady, you got a roof over your head, clothes on your back, 3 squares a day? And you're still not...fulfilled? Be GRATEFUL bitch!

TMink said...

I can relate to what she is saying. We go to church on Sundays, I teach a class when I am not in choir, but it seems so difficult to not treat Sunday as another Saturday after that, with chores and projects. Why is it so hard to just take a break one day a week? If I work longer during the week and on Saturday, would I be able to rest better on Sundays, or is it an attitude problem? I suspect the latter.

Trey

edutcher said...

As the trendies are faced with hard times, I think we'll see more of this.

rhhardin said...

Job never had to go to Sunday school.

pduggie said...

There is a tradition of referring to the Lord's Day as the 'Christian Sabbath'.

wyo sis said...

This is something I've thought about a lot lately. Sunday as a day of rest doesn't have to mean doing nothing, but doing other things. Doing the things that get neglected on the other six days. Things like visiting with friends and family, enjoying nature and refraining from commerce help us focus our thoughts. Even a nap is a great refresher, if you can get to sleep that night after a nap, even better.

Danno said...

Is the Chronicles of Higher Ed so politically correct that they can't print the word "god"? It was always spelled g-d.

Bender said...

Is the Chronicles of Higher Ed so politically correct that they can't print the word "god"? It was always spelled g-d.

Of course, politically correct is to spell out the entire word, and then in lower case, like a good little obnoxious atheist. (You, like Bill Maher, must have a backasswards idea of what "politically correct" means.)

The hugely politically incorrect way is, because of the holiness of the Name, is to be so respectful as to not say it out loud or spell it in its entirety. Hence, the use of the word "Lord" in its stead or the use of G-d or YHWH, as has been traditionally done for centuries.

deborah said...

Sometimes I think about looking into observing a traditional Shabbat. A Jewish pundit once observed it was a special bubble in time that can be accomplished anywhere.

Smilin' Jack said...

Is the Chronicles of Higher Ed so politically correct that they can't print the word "god"? It was always spelled g-d.

Doesn't matter how you spell it. The important thing is to pronounce it "Gow-wud."

The Crack Emcee said...

Your "faith’s expectation,...just hasn’t been cutting it for me" either.

What's "missing" is some semblance of a real life - you know, like your own (unfiltered) identity.

But never mind:

Any vision of what an atheist would call "normal" is sure to hit you like I'm throwing rotten vegetables,...

deborah said...

The Crack Emcee said...

What's "missing" is some semblance of a real life - you know, like your own (unfiltered) identity.
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