May 18, 2012

"State unions were dealt a setback Friday when a federal judge said they would have to get their members to opt in..."

"... rather than opt out, to having the state deduct union dues from their paychecks." 
What's more, the judge did not rule on dues deductions for unions that he earlier found the state improperly decertified. The state's largest unions were decertified, and the ruling - at least for now - will make it harder for them to get money from dues....

15 comments:

edutcher said...

Now that's really the end. With the money tap shut off, the public service unions will wither before the first frost.

X said...

The state wanted employees to have the ability to cancel their dues deductions at any time, but Conley agreed to allow the unions to have members commit to a year of dues deduction at a time.

seems like an own goal by the unions. people opt for freedom over a contract most of the time, unless there's an incentive.

Tom Spaulding said...

Helluva thing when the gravy train turns out to be high-speed rail.

Next stop, Willoughby.

Mayor Barrett will be there to welcome you.

David said...

People are not stupid about their own self interest (usually). If they really felt the union was of significant benefit to them, they would join.

edutcher said...

Tom Spaulding said...

Helluva thing when the gravy train turns out to be high-speed rail.

Next stop, Willoughby.

Mayor Barrett will be there to welcome you.


Keep in mind, it turns out to be a funeral home.

rhhardin said...

Why not, I say.

The law is all just winging-it judicial improvisation.

If you want rule of law, move to a state that has it.

Lauderdale Vet said...

"With the money tap shut off, the public service unions will wither before the first frost."
...
"If they really felt the union was of significant benefit to them, they would join."
...

Maybe this will be a really good thing, and the employee unions up there will learn to compete in the free market, and faithfully serve their members best interests.

frank said...

I'm not sure how many of you are aware that ALL regular [not temp or probationary] public employees have the full protection of their 'property interest' protected by federal law, see section 1984, et. seq., meaning they can not be fired without 'just cause', after a full and fair hearing, and that if they win $1.00 in damages from their public employer their attorney receives 'actual attorney fees' running to hundreds of thousands if not millions of dollars. FDR was right when he signed the NLRA saying it should never apply to public employees. What teachers could not win in the US Supreme Court in the 'Hortonville' case they acquired by hiring the prostitutes in Madison, a/k/a the Assembly, Senate and Governor in the '60's.

Methadras said...

Another win for the unrepresented taxpayer that has had to deal with unrepentant unionistas and their bag men representatives.

Richard Dolan said...

rh: "If you want the rule of law, move to a state that has it."

That's an odd complaint (although not a bad snarkism , if aimed at those who fled to stop the normal workings of democracy). The judge was applying established rules to a novel situation. Recognizing that reasonable people may differ, he stayed the ruling pending appeal.

What's the problem?

kcom said...

"What's the problem?"

The problem is this:

"The state wanted employees to have the ability to cancel their dues deductions at any time, but Conley agreed to allow the unions to have members commit to a year of dues deduction at a time."

Agreed to allow? Seriously? Is that the job of a judge? It sounds more like an arbitrator or mediator and not someone applying an actual law.

As rhardin says, it seems to be mostly "winging-it judicial improvisation".

elkh1 said...

On June 5, the union murmurs "rosebud".

Curious George said...

"But U.S. District Court Judge William Conley gave unions one beneficial ruling by saying that members who sign up to have their dues deducted from their paychecks can be required to make a yearlong commitment. That will help union leaders budget because they can better know how much money they will be getting, attorneys for the unions said."

I'll bet even those assholes singing "Solidarity Forever" at the Capitol everyday aren't paying their dues.

marybeth said...

Next stop, Willoughby.

One of my favorite episodes.

AprilApple said...

Where do those dues go? Why - Democrat coffers.