April 16, 2012

Tax Day oratory.

If you're wondering how the crowd was harangued at the Tax Day rally here in Madison on Saturday, I haven't processed any good video clips from what we recorded. But others, with more stable and well-positioned equipment have. You can watch Vicki McKenna and Dana Loesch. And here's some singing from Krista Branch (of "I Am America" fame).

Here, Meade took this picture of Branch belting:

Untitled

Here are some non-Tea Party guys mocking the National Anthem.

ADDED: Here's the video I took during the National Anthem. (You can see Meade at "rockets red glare.")

21 comments:

Palladian said...

That's enough to drive anyone into the arms of socialism.

wyo sis said...

Gotta love free speech!

rhhardin said...

What's the deal with national anthems anyway.

The only lyric that makes sense is play ball.

Wally Kalbacken said...

What exactly is "I Am America" fame?

chickenlittle said...

Does anybody remember laughter?

That sounds like distinctly Althousian and Meadian laughter at the 16 sec and 20 sec marks respectively in the Vicki McKenna video.

Am I right?

Chip S. said...

I only watched the clip of the non-Tea Party guys.

What time was that rally held? It seemed kind of early for anyone to be that drunk.

SGT Ted said...

I remember when Union members actually liked America and showed respect for the Anthem.

MadisonMan said...

I remember when Union members actually liked America and showed respect for the Anthem.

I'm curious to know which union you think those two people belong to.

The only assumption I'd make about them is that there is something besides coffee in their cups.

rhhardin said...

I like America and don't like the anthem or flags or pledges.

Somehow the public discourse doesn't allow that fairly common point of view.

The symbols only seem to allow people to step forward and declare themselves the guardians of public taste.

Traditionally unions, as said, though it's the knee-capping instinct that's being exercised there.

Thanks anyway, I have my own taste on patriotic matters.

edutcher said...

How dare those people love their country.

SGT Ted said...

I remember when Union members actually liked America and showed respect for the Anthem.

They were the hardhats of the Vietnam era. Their kid brothers and sons were over in 'Nam.

Later, they all became Reagan Democrats, but haven't been seen since.

MadisonMan said...

@rhhardin, I agree. I think it's far too easy -- for a politician especially -- to wrap themselves in a flag to no good purpose.

If someone is ultra-patriotic, I am suspicious of why.

Rusty said...

Steel Workers usually do. Probably public employees in the video. You know? Like the old postal employees who clock in then sit around drinking coffee and playing cards until it's time to punch out.

wyo sis said...

rhhardin
I love anthems and flags and the Pledge of Allegiance. I respect you your taste in disliking them. At the risk of confirming your suppositions I'd ask you to allow for the possibility that your interpretation of what others feel could be wrong.
If your feelings really are fairly common that makes me sad.
Loving your country's pomp and symbols is not necessarily autocratic.

edutcher said...

MadisonMan said...

@rhhardin, I agree. I think it's far too easy -- for a politician especially -- to wrap themselves in a flag to no good purpose.

Patriotism is the last refuge/defense...

I believe we had a discussion of that here.

rhhardin said...

Loving your country's pomp and symbols is not necessarily autocratic.

There's nothing wrong with loving it, just in intimidating into agreement.

That's the usual mode your beloved symbols are inflicted with.

Try not holding your hat over your heart at the start of a baseball game, or not standing for that matter.

Who would want to associate with these patriots?

Nice head you have there, shame if anything should happen to it.

It's pretty well contaminated now, suggesting another symbol might be needed.

A song with an actual melody would be nice too.

The reason for pledges and anthems in schools and ballparks is to get the crowd to shut up and pay attention, relying in the case of ball games on crowd intimidation, and in the case of school on discipline. It marks the start of something, not something patriotic.

The intimidation factor carries over to other patriotic uses.

So watch what you love. That's where the banality of evil starts, according to Hannah Arendt.

Rusty said...

rhhardin said...
I like America and don't like the anthem or flags or pledges.

Somehow the public discourse doesn't allow that fairly common point of view.

The symbols only seem to allow people to step forward and declare themselves the guardians of public taste.

Traditionally unions, as said, though it's the knee-capping instinct that's being exercised there.

Thanks anyway, I have my own taste on patriotic matters.



I pretty much feel same way except about the flag.
About 20 years ago or so I had the experience of a driving tour around Normandy. The beach and the cemeteries are impressive and sobering. But what impressed me the most was at just about every little two lane cross road was a monument. Just a crappy little country intersection with maybe a gas pump and a bar and a barn. Five or six houses. Every monument read just about the same thing, "Dedicated to The United States Army Soldiers of-such and such company or platoon- who gave their lives to liberate this village." Not much as far as monuments go, but every one has flowers growing around it and are tended as if they were just erected the day before. Every one has an American flag on it.
I've thought a little differently about the flag since then.
Just my experience.

Salamandyr said...

Ironic that I've always found the Pledge of Allegiance to be a Progressive bit of agitprop, but it's the conservatives who embrace it, largely because they are the nationalists in this particular country.

wyo sis said...

rhhardin
You place the meaning. If it means all those negative things to you I feel sorry for you for the experiences that made that happen.

It means love, summer breezes, tears in my strong father's eyes, parades and peace to me. I don't think those emotions are propaganda and I don't think they lead to evil.

hombre said...

Incredible! These morons don't know the words to the National Anthem.

SGT Ted said...

Yesa its such a bitch to stand and show respect for the anthem and flag of your country in a public venue. Nevermind the guy looking at you because you can't be bothered to stand for 45 seconds you may have buried a son under that flag.

Slavery it is.

Tell me, do the chain cuffs chafe you badly as they whip you into singing the anthem ast the ball games?

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