June 13, 2010

"Instead of simply vanishing, a large bubble disperses into a ring of smaller bubbles."

"Pop" science.

5 comments:

HDHouse said...

Interesting. Thanks for posting this. I wonder if when kids bubbles are formed in one of those toy gizmos they disperse the same way as those on a surface?

edutcher said...

Similar to the way Congress cuts spending.

Tyrone Slothrop said...

I wonder what the analog might be, if there is one, with spherical bubbles? Do they pop into spherical fields of tiny bubbles? What would Don Ho say? Inquiring minds want to know.

Baden said...

I'm just guessing, but I suppose the analogy would be similar with spherical bubbles. The driving force that forms the smaller bubble is nothing more than the surface tension overcoming the internal pressure of an unpopped bubble. Once punctured the liquid film (unable to retain its shape) seeks a new equilibrium in whatever shape supports the conditions. Be it into smaller bubbles or even contracting altogether into a small droplet or mist. And once popped, the condition of a surface bubble seems fairly equal to a surface bubble. Just my $0.01999

HDHouse said...

@edutcher...see, you get off topic so fast...I mean what if I told you that when I saw the title "large bubble disperses into a ring of smaller bubbles you would have accused me of fixating on Sarah....