March 9, 2010

"It's not just these few hours..."

"... but I've been waiting since I toddled/for the great relief of having you to talk to."

(A year ago, today.)



ADDED: Also a year ago: this.

12 comments:

Meade said...

(Relocated) redbuds.

traditionalguy said...

That is beautiful. Pillow talk is heaven on earth, and all we need is a listener that is safe to tell our secrets to.

El Pollo Real said...

Odd that name "Lovin' Spoonful"

Whence does it come?

Ann Althouse said...

@El Pollo It comes from "Coffee Blues" by Mississippi John Hurt.

This is the "Coffee Blues", I likes a certain brand
- Maxwell's House - it's good till the last drop,
just like it says on the can. I used to have a girl
cookin' a good Maxwell House. She moved away.
Some said to
Memphis
and some said to Leland,
but I found her. I wanted her to cook me some
good Maxwell's House. You understand,
if I can get me just a spoonful of Maxwell's House,
do me much good as two or three cups this other coffee)
I've got to go to Memphis, bring her back to
Leland
I wanna see my baby 'bout a lovin'
spoonful
, my lovin' spoonful
Well, I'm just got to have my lovin'
(spoken: I found her)
Good mornin', baby, how you do this mornin'?
Well, please, ma'am, just a lovin' spoon,
just a lovin' spoonful
I declare, I got to have my lovin' spoonful
My baby packed her suitcase and she went away
I couldn't let her stay for my lovin',
my lovin' spoonful
Well, I'm just got to have my lovin'
Good mornin', baby, how you do this mornin'?
Well, please, ma'am, just a lovin' spoon,
just a lovin' spoonful
I declare, I got to have my lovin' spoonful
Well, the preacher in the pulpit, jumpin' up and down
He laid his bible down for his lovin'
(spoken: Ain't Maxwell House all right?)
Well, I'm just got to have my lovin'


That's about sex.

El Pollo Real said...

@Althouse: thanks. That's a ladleful of song history!

Ann Althouse said...

Some of those lyrics are spoken. Listen to it here. If you don't know Mississippi John Hurt, you're in for a big treat.

traditionalguy said...

That was very interesting. Another southern phrase used in my wife's family is, "I love you so much that I could eat you with a spoon".

edutcher said...

Reminds me of the long distance conversations The Blonde and I had. The only person I've ever been willing to hang on the line just to hear her.

traditionalguy said...

That was very interesting. Another southern phrase used in my wife's family is, "I love you so much that I could eat you with a spoon".

Ain't just Southern. Us Yankees use it, too.

WV "hermory" What kicks in some time before Ann writes a sentimental or romantic post.

Bob_R said...

Thank you. I will now play the album Joe Cocker! for the next four days.

kentuckyliz said...

People use the loving/eating expression with babies all the time. You're so cute I could eat you up. Followed by some babytoe nibbling or a razzberry on the belly acting like you're taking a bite.

I believe it is a latent expression of archetypal deep desires for cannibalism.

j/k

But to love enough to consume the beloved...a bit Dahmerish, don't you think?

I shouldn't think such creepy thoughts. I am staying in The Shining Hotel and I am in this building all by myself and it's hotter than Hades in here. So I wear next to nothing. I'm watching myself like in a horror movie, wondering why I'm not running away from the axe murderer. I have the cool air on in the room but the master unit for the building must be on winter boil.

Robert Cook said...

The song was featured in YOU'RE A BIG BOY NOW, one of Francis Ford Coppola's first (if not THE first) feature films. It's a quirky coming of age story about a young man in NYC, set in the mid-60s, starring now-forgotten Peter Kastner.

ken in sc said...

Thanks for the info on "Lovin Spoonful". I always thought it had something to do with melting heroin in a spoon before shooting up.