January 3, 2010

"There were lots of demands on Karzai from people asking for Cabinet positions because they campaigned for him."

"This was the only way he could reward them and if parliament didn't approve them, it wasn't his fault. Very soon, Karzai will come out with a new list with the names of people he really wants to have in his Cabinet."

8 comments:

edutcher said...

And this makes him corrupt and so unlike the US of A in the eyes of the Demos and Lefties how?

WV "nonsi" The opposite of Yes in the Spanish Newspeak dictionary.

AllenS said...

Oh, no! These people want a government much like ours (US).

Jason (the commenter) said...

They can spin it however they like, but Karzai needs to bribe these people to maintain security. Is the warlord going to work for someone else, someone willing to pay him? That's what I want to know.

Jason (the commenter) said...

Karzai can't make promises about the future anymore. His administration is over, he's a lame duck. Not something we need in Afghanistan right now.

David said...

His administration is over, he's a lame duck.

Wow, Jason, it really is just like the USA.

Roux said...

Not something we need in Afghanistan right now.

Yep just like Obama.

Charlie Martin said...

Couldn't he just make them all czars?

Kevin said...

The news story instantiates a particular peeve of mine. It is full of the writer's (or editor's) opinions, but doesn't actually contain any names or facts about the rejected (or accepted) ministers.

Emotion, not content.

And none of the other stories I've seen in the English language press has more than two names -- Wardak (retained at Defense) and Ismail Khan (rejected -- he's the warlord they're concerned about, and he's very unlikely to join the Taliban. Instead, he's dead certain to return to his power base in Herat and continue running the area from there to the Iranian border, regardless of which popinjay gets named de jure governor.

Having this particular warlord bottled up in a ministry actually reduced warlordism, but you can't expect AP editors to figure that out, given their limited travel and generally narrow and shallow English-major educations.