November 2, 2009

This is exactly what the Sunday talk shows feel like to me too.

Absolutely perfect.

22 comments:

knox said...

Love those illustrations. esp. Geithner

Sunday morning shows are unbearable.

SteveR said...

Well they certainly are cartoons.

mccullough said...

There's always ESPN's NFL Countdown.

Chris said...

I wonder how many people actually watch those shows?

Bissage said...

Watching the Sunday talk shows to convert them into art means that Crack Skull Bob suffers for us all, just like Jesus.

Chris said...

Beated by mccullough.

ricpic said...

Insiders talking to each other. And being insiders it's all about -- How do we make this thing work? It's never -- Let's blow the damn thing up. Hell, if I were an insider I'd have the same attitude. It's nice being inside the buttercup, where you can feign agonizing concern with the added satisfaction of simultaneously sticking it to the rubes.

Bob said...

And he does this as a weekly feature, Ann.

Theo Boehm said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Maxine Weiss said...

http://online.wsj.com/article/declarations.html


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bagoh20 said...

Of all the ways to spend a Sunday morning, Those shows have to be the least informing, entertaining, life affirming, interesting..., well just the worst.

Even reading this blog is better in all those ways.

I find the people on these shows are either people who know nothing, but will tell you lots or people who know lots, but tell you nothing. Either way, it's a thin broth.

It's talk for talk's sake. The agendas are so transparent, well-known and predictable that you can virtually tell what they are saying with the sound off, just by knowing who each person is. Nothing novel or insightful, especially compared to what is available elsewhere.

Penny said...

Personally, I love Sunday morning political talk shows.

There are still a lot of people who rely on these shows for their dose of politics, so it's good to see exactly what they are being fed.

Pick your poison... Nightly news on the major networks or the Sunday morning shows.

Penny said...

That being said, I missed this Sunday's shows, but happened to catch a few minutes of Meet the Press in a late night repeat. Funny that the cartoonist happened to pick up the few minutes I saw.

Mealy mouthed, David Gregory was BRUTAL to Geithner.

My read of this is that the Democrats are seeing Geithner as the economic fall guy. I hope he is prepared for being thrown under the Obama Bus. It's getting crowded down there.

knox said...

I wonder how many people actually watch those shows?

I know a couple (both over 65) who DVRs the NBC Nightly News. That's the demographic, I imagine.

wally said...

I was wondering why my numbers would go through the roof every once in a while.

Penny said...

Total Nightly News viewers for the week October 19.

• Total Viewers: NBC: 8,280,000 / ABC: 7,690,000 / CBS: 5,970,000

Which of course includes that old couple that knox knows.

Ralph L said...

I hope he [Geithner] is prepared for being thrown under the Obama Bus
He's already had his eyebrows singed off. The bus ain't far behind him.

Penny said...

Drudge got over 16.9 million hits in the last 24 hours.

Aaron John said...

This is exactly what your blog feels like to me. Except there is less variation and you are even more predictable.

Mark Daniels said...

It used to be that the Sunday talk shows--all three of them--aired starting at the lunch hour, none competing with the hour, and the NFL had to wait.

They weren't very slick and featured full half-hour interviews with one person each week.

That probably made them a lot more substantive than these shows can manage these days. (Although personally, I rarely see any of them, except as excerpts on the Internet, because Sunday morning is pretty much prime time for we pastors.)

One thing I feel reasonably certain about though is that Lawrence Spivak never got a $100 haircut (or its 1940s through 1970s equivalent). That probably can't be said about David Gregory. (Not nostalgia; just a commentary on what the priorities may be in postmodern mass media.)

Bruce Hayden said...

I am not sure why anyone bothers to watch them. I turn them off, as they seem to almost always be spinning either for or against the government (depending on the party in charge) as fast as they can. In short, propaganda aimed at people who really don't know what is going on in this country.

Stan said...

Agree with Bruce. Why watch politicians spin propaganda.

Does anyone think that an intelligent, bi-partisan show which actually focused on facts and issues in an in-depth fashion would find an audience? I know it costs more to produce than a show featured flapping gums, but an hour long look at a single issue which cut through all the BS and laid out the real facts would be a breath of fresh air.

Imagine a show which blew away all the false crap we've been fed about the "health care crisis". One that actually dealt with real issues -- tort reform, defensive medicine, medicare fraud, need for interstate competition, medical training reforms, record-keeping innovation, etc. A show which exposed the horrors of national health care in Europe and then had an honest debate about whether we want to go that way in the US.

Imagine an honest, competent news media producing one hour a week of quality, issue-oriented journalism that focused on facts and dispelled propaganda. You know, one that spoke truth to power.