October 26, 2009

Rewriting those hotel towel-use cards to let guests know that a majority of hotel guests do, in fact, opt to reuse their towels.

An experiment adding the true fact that a majority of hotel guests opt to reuse their towels got 34% more guests to reuse.

Don't just guilt-trip us about the environment. Exert peer pressure. When I'm naked in that hotel bathroom deciding how to communicate with the maids in the language of towel signaling — rehang = reuse, drop on the floor = do the laundry — am I more influenced by the morality of planet-saving or the desire to be like other people? To tell you the truth, I'm most influenced by the fact that I'm paying for clean towels.

The link goes to an article that's mostly about trying to get people to quit using dryers altogether and switch to line-drying. Do you hang your clothes out to dry? If not, what would it take to get you to line-dry? Do you want your neighbors hanging their clothes outside?

When I was growing up in the 50s and 60s, my family did not have a clothes dryer, and we disapproved of women who used dryers. (Only women did the laundry.) It had absolutely nothing to do with protecting the environment. It was solely about how fresh and clean we expected the laundry to be. Resorting to a dryer was considered a bit slovenly. Slatternly.

But I would never hang laundry outdoors today. Quite aside from the fact that I live on a wooded lot, and there are always squirrels running across the branches knocking vegetable matter into the air, I wouldn't want every passerby to see what things I've laundered. Yes, it could be considered aesthetically pleasing if there were lots of flat white sheets and towels and big white shirts, but what are you going to do? Cull through your washings and find the things that look spiffy hanging in the breeze and the smaller/more intimate items you'll have to drape over indoor racks?

99 comments:

Meade said...

"lots of flat white sheets and towels and big white shirts"

Oh but, what, you'd be embarrassed if the neighbors got a peek at my big chambray shirts and overalls?

Clothesist.

kentuckyliz said...

I don't have a dryer--I hang dry.

Mostly racks indoors in the spare room, but neighbor has a long line for bigger items like sheets.

Sometimes I put the racks outside to speed drying but wind blows off my knickers. Bright southern sun fades my colors too much. Great for whites though.

My clothes last FOREVER. Dryers break down fabrics really fast.

You have to get used to the first use of a towel being kinda crunchy.

chuck b. said...

I'm amazed how fast things dry when I put them outside for a mere 20 minutes. Then it's in the drier for 20 minutes more to finish and fluff. I hate hearing the drier run all day long. I live in a small house.

Mian said...

Clothesline as status symbol. Who ever thought we'd see the day? Just look at the linked NYT article, showing a pic where the homeowner has his clothesline stretched across the front of his house for all the world to see.

Clothesline on display? Drawers line-drying in the wind? My mother would've died.

rhhardin said...

Francis Ponge previously cited on washing machines and clothes lines here.

The clothesline conclusion

A thousand white flags are suddenly unfurled - attesting not to defeat, but to victory - and are not just, perhaps, the sign of corporal propriety among the inhabitants of the neighborhood.

Pogo said...

1) The worst thing that you or I can do for the planet is to have children who will make an even bigger mess, and need their towels washed and dried.

2) Fluffy towels are the sign of a sinner.

3) Hotels should print the names of the guests who refuse to save the planet, those carbon-emitters who demand the towels get washed every day, and post them in the lobby for all to see, room numbers, cell phone numbers, home addresses and all. That's peer pressure.

4) Hotels are weak; they need a Towel Stasi.

Mr. Forward said...

Apparently Althouse loves men who don't wear shorts OR pants.

wv: wintem = is it over yet?

jimspice said...

Re: peer pressure. Heard on NPR this weekend about a campaign to increase hand washing at public restrooms via sign usage. The wording that worked best was something like "did the person next to you wash their hands?" Supposedly, it reminds people that others are watching them.

MadisonMan said...

I dry my clothes outside on a line, usually. At this time of year you have to keep up with the weather forecast, because sometimes -- more often than not now -- it requires doing laundry after dinner, hanging them out overnight, and then taking them in the next day.

We also have lines up in the basement, for those very wet stretches of days. I'll typically get things almost dry in the basement, then run the dryer for a little bit to finish them off.

I usually re-use towels in hotels, too, and don't ask for new bed linens either.

MadisonMan said...

We used to have a guy at the office who didn't wash after using the bathroom.

We called him penis fingers.

oldirishpig said...

Is there really anything left that qualifies as an 'intimate' item these days?

MadisonMan said...

When you see a load of laundry on the line, what do you see? I don't actually key in on individual items, I see the whole thing. I might note that there are shirts, or undergarments, or bras, or pants, or bedding, or towels, but I never really look at items, just the whole.

Am I unusual?

Robin said...

Those towel use cards infuriate me with their manipulative dishonesty. So much so that the moment I see one, I toss every towel, wash cloth, and hand towel on the floor.

What would it take for me to line-dry? A big man with a big gun. Pointed at my head.

Mr. Forward said...

It's OK to wear the shorts
When you're young and playing sports
If they see London and France
Then you need to wear the pants
But if you're really on the ball
You'll be The Man in overalls.

AJ Lynch said...

It rained so often here in PA this year, our clothes would never had time to dry outside.

bearbee said...

I'm most influenced by the fact that I'm paying for clean towels.
Would you consider the option of a decreased rate reflecting towel reuse?

Do you want your neighbors hanging their clothes outside?
Wouldn't bother me.

..there are always squirrels running across the branches knocking vegetable matter into the air,..

A giant Mead scarecrow?

I wouldn't want every passerby to see what things I've laundered.

What if the trend was outdoor line drying? There is alternative indoor line drying.

Lockestep said...

I'd consider the intimate laundry more pleasing to the eye than the sheets.
But that's just me, I guess.

WV: hothea - a hea with a particularly nice butt.

Bill Harshaw said...

You surely aren't implying that you didn't wear intimates back in the day when your family used line-drying?

You must be saying that in these puritanical times you're much more embarrassed by public display of underwear?

rhhardin said...

I hang things that shrink in dryers (eg sweatshirts) or are hard to dry (eg towels) on a line in the basement, ready for use the next time laundry is done.

It doesn't have to be a very big line.

Pogo said...

Hotel towel wastrels should be made to wear the cone of shame.

traditionalguy said...

Why is there constant talk about rationing all of the things men, women and children need produced to live well when we are in a recession/depression primarily because there is not enough demand for the supply that has come on line all over the world? Is it a mental illness being run up the flag pole to see how many weak minded fools will salute it? Consumption is not a sin. The New Socialist Overlords are just conditioning us to believe that it is our fault when their favorite control system over us impoverishes everyone overnight.

class-factotum said...

I line-dry my clothes (in the back yard) when the weather permits (less than half the year in Milwaukee) and so do my neighbors. I don't care that I see K's big bras hanging on the line. Big deal.

I don't give a darn about the environment. I just hate to spend the money to run the dryer; the dryer is hard on clothes; and I like the way line-dried clothes smell.

I also use cloth grocery bags. Not because I CARE (I don't -- but use paper, not plastic, because I used to work for a paper company and might have a pension someday) but because it is a lot easier to carry the cloth bags.


http://class-factotum.blogspot.com/2009/04/wisconsin-101-thats-illegal.html

Dust Bunny Queen said...

If I put my laundry outside to dry in the winter I would have frozen stiff icicle laundry.I like using the dryer in winter. It helps to keep the house warmer.

In the summer I would have really really dry laundry in no time because it is hot with no humidity and with an afternoon prevailing wind from the west that you can pretty much set your clock by. But like Ann, I would have leaves and bird poop all over the stuff.

Changing your towels in a hotel every day when you stay for several days is just silly. Do you use a fresh towel daily at home? No. So why do it when at a hotel. You are supposed to be clean when you use the towel so it is just wet. Hang it up and it will dry.

Janis Gore said...

My mother line dried everything in the house for 30 years, right up until she could afford a dryer.

Good Lord, it was a wonderful thing to come out of a bout of fever, have a bath, and be put to bed on clean, crisp, sunny sheets. That was Dallas, TX.

But I don't do that. I live in west-central Louisiana where the humidity is high. I don't have a clue how long it would take a queen sheet to dry on a line.

Do you boys remember blue jean stretchers?

TRO said...

I pay good money to a hotel to give me clean towels and sheets every day and I want them. They could lower the cost of the room and I would still want them.

Janis Gore said...

Silly-ass girl, that's east-central LA.

Bissage said...

If you slick yourself off, after a shower, a hand towel is more than enough and who doesn’t like to slick off?

AllenS said...

Jennifer Aniston uses a really little towel, because she doesn't stay in the shower long enough to get all that wet.

Photog714 said...

Ann said: I wouldn't want every passerby to see what things I've laundered.

Oh, you tease, you! Now give us a peep at your Frederick's of Hollywood collection.

Ignorance is Bliss said...

Don't just guilt-trip us about the environment. Exert peer pressure.

All my friends tell me not to give in to peer pressure.

k*thy said...

I’m not going out in the winter to hang sheets and towels and such. Though we have a decent yard for hanging things outside (southern exposure), I have done it in the past, but don't any more. All the structures have been taken down or rotted away. I do hang more delicate items on lines in the basement, though.

As for for hotel towels, I can reuse. I do it at home - it's no skin off my nose.

Sofa King said...

Don't just guilt-trip us about the environment.

Oh, but they're not! They're guilt-tripping you about cutting into their profits! Otherwise they'd simply charge for clean towels.

Ignorance is Bliss said...

In my neighborhood any of the really good intimate stuff would get stolen off of the clotheslines. Every chance I got.

Pogo said...

We need an internet page of Enviro-sinners.

A good two minutes of hate directed at towel wasters is a good way to start the day.

a psychiatrist who learned from veterans said...

I have a small line next to the house mostly obscured by some bushes, will hang the socks out over the weekend; sweated up some clothes working on a fence post and put them in the Bosch front loader which weighs the clothes before adding 'the right amount of water' and hung them out too. They got a second rinse with the rain last night in Dallas. So I do a bit of boutique laundry. Incidentally I jerry rigged the line with some tall plant spikes, plastic covered wire.

My mom had an industrial strength, comparatively, clothes line on which she dried everything. We were visiting her mother once and she was looking for a favorite paring knife (shades of having to find out who took it 'the hard way'). It was discovered in the dishwasher where she had put if for a demonstration of how that worked our previous visit.

Robin said...

Do you use a fresh towel daily at home?

There are lots of things I do differently at home. I make the bed every day. I vacuum. I cook. At a hotel, I'm paying not to do those things, and I'm also paying not to reuse my dirty towels.

Joan said...

If I put wet clothes out here, most days they'd just get dirty again: it's hot, dry, dusty, and windy. The first two are great for drying clothes, the second two, not so much.

Just the thought of handling wet clothing for the five members of my household makes my hands ache.

We just got new laundry machines and they are fantastic. Every time I use them I am thankful for the great improvements in laundry technology they represent.

peter hoh said...

It appears that the heading to this entry needs to be rewritten.

At the very least, it is missing the word "know" between "guests" and "that."

Freeman Hunt said...

When my aunt was born, my grandmother had TB, so my grandfather had to do all of the house and baby work for several months.

He hung the clothes out to dry in the middle of the night so that neighbors would not see him doing the work that men did not do.

former law student said...

When we moved into this house, while there was a four-line clothesline, there was no connection for a dryer. (We tapped into the water heater's gas line.)So twenty-five years worth of previous owners relied on the clothesline.

The modest or squeamish can hang sheets on the outside, and put their unmentionables on the inside where they are unseen.

Basements work, but then you get cracker crisp towels. Outdoors, the wind fluffs up towels.

Myssi said...

I loved line drying my linens and jeans at my old house. I no longer have room for a clothesline at the new one and I truly miss it.

Alas, I had to choose between a kitchen garden and a clothesline and fresh veggies won.

Still, I'd bet my family of 6 has a smaller carbon footprint than most journalists who write about AGW. We live in an extremely small home and walk and bike whenever it's possible because we like it. Plus, that kitchen garden uses a certain portion of our carbon to live on...

CarmelaMotto said...

I had to go to the laundramat until 5 years ago. Then I got a place with a washer hook up and a line. Now I have no line and use the dryer, and miss the fresh clothes.

What I don't miss is a sudden thunderstorm and underwear falling off onto the roof below. Or freezing weather.

Dryers rock. Having my own washer and dryer rocks over the laundramat.

miller said...

Ditto on what Robin said.

When I'm in a hotel, I'm paying for special treats such as someone cleaning up my room and restocking supplies, including fresh towels.

My towels at home are large & luxurious. The cheap cotton ones in hotels are usually thin and scratchy, so I'm OK with asking for a new one.

What I'd really like is a room where the information about how the alarm clock works is easily findable. I've never been able to figure out how they work, and end up using my cell phone as an alarm.

Sheepman said...

Most people don't change their bedsheets everyday and they use a towel more than once. Why should things be different when staying at a hotel?

The rational thing would be to charge extra for such a service and not force normal people to subsidize those who like to pretend that they are royalty when staying at a hotel.

miller said...

Plus we upgrade to front-loading washer and dryer, elevated on a stand.

I can't tell you how much easier it is and how much less achy my back is after doing laundry - the wet clothes are much easier to retrieve and move to the dryer.


I love our Western technology and the competitive marketplace that seeks continual improvement.

Pogo said...

"those who like to pretend that they are royalty when staying at a hotel."

The kulaks!

CarmelaMotto said...

Actually, the local paper complained about how ugly it is that so many people have laundry hanging between buildings in my NYC neighborhood. It's a very unhip area and it's done for necessity (no dryer venting), not to be "green." I don't see laundry on the line in the hip neighborhoods like Park Slope.

I wonder, did Babs Streisand start hanging out her laundry?

Sheepman said...

Do you hang your clothes out to dry?
I do it inside, on a tiered rack that I keep behind a decorative screen in the corner. It takes a day to dry but it's less wear and tear on my clothes and I don't have the noise of a dryer in my apartment.

Ann Althouse said...

"The wording that worked best was something like "did the person next to you wash their hands?" Supposedly, it reminds people that others are watching them."

Did they try a signs that read "We used to have a guy/woman at the office who didn't wash after using the bathroom. We called him/her penis/vulva fingers."

rdkraus said...

Most people don't change their bedsheets everyday and they use a towel more than once. Why should things be different when staying at a hotel?

Because, when you are on vacation, the whole idea is - it should be different. I want to be pampered on vacation. I want to feel special to the extent I can afford it. I want to pretend I am royalty and being treated that way.

We went to Hawaii this summer. The whole two weeks was like this. It's like being in a fantasy land, and that's a great thing on vacation.

When on vacation, or even eating out at a special place, my wife and I often remark it's like pretending you're rich.

rdkraus said...

Incidentally, if you cut all of the hotels' laundry by, say, 50%, that's a lot of people (not rich ones either) you're putting out of a job.

Why do greenies hate poor people?

Original Mike said...

When we moved into this house, while there was a four-line clothesline, there was no connection for a dryer. (We tapped into the water heater's gas line.)So twenty-five years worth of previous owners relied on the clothesline.

Or they had electric dryers.

prairie wind said...

I grew up hanging wet laundry on the clothesline. We had a five-wire clothesline, and woe to the ninny who hung something on the wrong line. If the wind was from the south, you filled up the north-most line first so the laundry blew away from you as you filled the next line. Nothing worse than getting whanged in the head with a jeans-loaded clothesline in a wind.

When movies show someone hanging laundry (just watched Tender Mercies, an all-time favorite), they inevitably hang things "wrong." They hang a shirt with two clothespins and then two pins for the next shirt. That wastes space and clothespins. We hung them in a continuous fashion: two shirts took three pins, the two items sharing a pin, and son on down the clothesline. There's a science to it.

Yes, I remember jeans stretchers. Laundry was hard work. Mom used a three-tub washer with a fascinating wringer. We kids liked the job of putting rinsed clothes through the wringer. After the kids were all grown and gone, Dad used to hang the laundry for Mom...and in the daylight. Easy enough, though because we lived in the country and nobody around to see and think about our skivvies.

I still hang up (inside) as much as possible, but mostly shirts and pants; dryers are hard on clothing as someone said upthread. But give up my dryer? Not on your life.

Sheepman said...

I want to be pampered on vacation. I want to feel special to the extent I can afford it. I want to pretend I am royalty and being treated that way.

Fair enough. My point was that those that feel this need should pay for it. Or, at least, give a discount to those who don't need or want superfluous cleaning during a short stay.

Original Mike said...

My point was that those that feel this need should pay for it.

They are paying for it.

So are you, by the way.

Father Martin Fox said...

..."did the person next to you wash their hands?" ...

Grrr. Correct English is, "did the person next to you wash his hands" -- or "hers" for the women's room. This business of using a plural pronoun to denote a singular quantity is slovenly.

If one is cowed by political correctness into avoiding the standard, generic "his," one has options that still avoid cruddy English.

They, them and their refer to plural people. FYI, everyone, anyone and someone are singular, so these words take a singular his or her.

Bad Penny said...

In summer I use a spin dryer and then hang clothes on a fenced patio. It's hot enough that I can hang laundry at 7 and it's dry by 10. In winter I use the spin dryer and hang outside if it's not wet out. I use the tumble dryer sometimes to soften things up after they've line dried.

My hippie uber-green community organizer daughter comes over and uses the tumble dryer. I refrain from pointing out the error of her ways.

Pogo said...

Washing your hands with soap wastes water, however.

Clearly the only answer is death, starting with Europe.

Father Martin Fox said...

At hotels, I tend to hang up my towels not because I prefer to reuse them (I don't much care--I usually have clean towels left on the rack anyway, so I can just use those the next day; also, I don't often stay in a hotel more than one night anyway), but because I think it's sloppy to throw my wet towels on the floor. I hang them up.

Alex said...

3) Hotels should print the names of the guests who refuse to save the planet, those carbon-emitters who demand the towels get washed every day, and post them in the lobby for all to see, room numbers, cell phone numbers, home addresses and all. That's peer pressure.

Believe me you jest with that, but the HuffPo crowd would be deadly seriously in favor of it.

Joe said...

The only reason I dislike my dryer is that it's electric, not gas. Not only is natural gas cheaper, it dries the clothes faster. And the smell and feel of clothes fresh from the dryer--priceless.

Alex said...

Sheepman:

I do it inside, on a tiered rack that I keep behind a decorative screen in the corner. It takes a day to dry but it's less wear and tear on my clothes and I don't have the noise of a dryer in my apartment.

That's your choice, don't force it on the rest of us. Unless you want another civil war.

Joe said...

Hotels should print the names and room numbers of the guests who insist on saving the the planet so the other guests can give them their old towels.

Paddy O. said...

I only dry my clothes for three minutes a day.

Meade said...

...the vice president's gone mad

Sheepman said...

That's your choice, don't force it on the rest of us. Unless you want another civil war.

No need to be so prickly. I'm not advocating forcing anything on anyone. I was responding to simple query.

Can't you tolerate a different point of view, way of living, without rattling your Civil War sword?

bearbee said...

Hotels should print the names and room numbers of the guests who insist on saving the the planet so the other guests can give them their old towels.

Ha, ha......ugh

MadisonMan said...

One thing I'll use the dryer for: To dry a sweatshirt for my kid so that just before they go to school, they can put on a clean, warm sweatshirt. They really like that in the cold days of winter.

Sheepman said...

Meade, beat me to it. Great song

Titus said...

My clothes are hand laundered by Buddhists and as a result my clothes have the scent of curry on them.

thank you.

Oh and tits.

Paddy O. said...

Father MF,

Using "their" as a neutral singular isn't slovenly at all. Indeed, it's much less offensive than using a representative gender or using the terribly awkward "his or hers".

Plus, it has a good history of use.

Titus said...

My tibetan launderers are republicans as I do a background check on all my domestic help and require they are registered republicans.

Yes, it can take a little extra time and research but you can find republican domestic help.

former law student said...

Or they had electric dryers.

They would have had to run off 120VAC, if so -- there are no 220 VAC outlets in the whole house.

Meade said...

If I lived on a sunny lot in a neighborhood that allowed them, in a USDA Zone 6b climate or warmer, I would work one of these babies into the backyard design.

Bart Hall (Kansas, USA) said...

I've used the solar dryer option for about 40 years. You work around the crappy weather and when you have to do you dry necessaries in the house on a rack in front of the wood stove.

There are two great disadvantages to drying outdoors: When the mulberries or pokeweeds are in fruit the bird shit can be terrible, and when the weather is dry and hot for any extended periods the grasshoppers like to eat shirts.

Titus said...

I love Father Fox's contribution here.

It is nice to get a non lay person's perspective.

Are you with me fellow republicans?

Father Martin Fox said...

Paddy says:

"Father MF,"--ahem...er...well, let us pass by that...

"Using 'their' as a neutral singular isn't slovenly at all. Indeed, it's much less offensive than using a representative gender or using the terribly awkward 'his or hers'.

"Plus, it has a good history of use."

Yeah? Well...well...'It jes' ain't fittin'... It ain't fittin'.'

former law student said...

one of these babies

My old neighbors had one of those. The couple who owned the house during the boom took it out as part of their remodeling frenzy. (After three years of living next to a construction site, I felt a bit of schadenfreude when they were foreclosed on. They had moved in with her parents to escape the chaos, but they did not offer us the same relief. They were able to unload it in time to the Conspicuous Consumers who live there now.)

Paddy O. said...

Father MF,"--ahem...er...well, let us pass by that...

ha! Oh my... I didn't catch this...

Profuse apologies. I see what my lazy, cost-cutting ways, cause.

Anthony said...

We line dry (inside) just to keep some stuff from shrinking in the drier, and also to keep costs down a bit, but mostly to keep things from shrinking. I suppose we could put up lines in the back yard, but the weather here (Seattle) is too rainy most of the year for that to be practical.

Nevertheless, I can see the Helpful Government requiring line drying soon. . . .

Alex said...

Some associations prohibit line drying on your balcony. It would "upset" the upscale image of the place.

MadisonMan said...

My neighbors have one of those breezecatchers -- didn't know that's what they were called -- but they take it inside during the winter. We just have 4 lines strung between the garage and a post in the ground.

Cutting down the large tree in our back yard -- it was splitting -- solved the bird poop problem. There's nothing above the line anymore.

Brian Hancock said...

At an indoor waterpark in the Dells, where I stayed with my family a few years ago, they had a sign in the bathroom about "saving the environment and conserving water" - by reusing towels and sheets.

It was laughable that an indoor waterpark was so concerned about about conserving water, so I assumed it was about saving money in soap and washing.

chickenlittle said...

Alternative use for one of those babies.

traditionalguy said...

In the early 1950s before dryers were common everybody hung clothes out to dry on the clotheslines and prayed that it would not rain. From mid-july to mid-August it did rain everyday with thunderstorm that you could set your watch by.We called that the dog days. But since the 1970s all subdivision covenants forbid hanging out clothes to dry. And without unanimous consent or a Supreme Court decison those Restrictions cannot be legally changed. Maybe like prohibition days, only hidden illegal dryers will be permitted on places like Berkely.

Beaverdam said...

My wife doesn't allow me in the laundry room. I always wonder what is really going on in there. Who is this Bounce thing?

BJM said...

I would love to have a clothes line, unfortunately they were banned years ago in the SF Bay Area.

I never re-use a bath towel, aka germ colony. 'Nuff said.

prairie wind said...

You won't use a bath towel again, but you'll hang clean laundry out to dry where birds and poop on them?

traditionalguy said...

Beaverdan...It is politically incorrect in the laundry room more than you can imagine. My wife requires that whites and darker colors must always be washed separately. I told her that was not being equal, but she threatened to quit on me and make me figure out how to use the multiple space age controls on our Maytags by myself. I believe that she also stores chlorine gas in there in a liquid form.

Gabriel Hanna said...

My dear wife and I live in an apartment complex and so we have nowhere to hang clothes, we have to use a dryer.

Even if we had our own house, we still probably would use a dryer most of the time, for the same reason we use a flush toilet instead of collecting our nightsoil and putting it on our rice paddy the next morning.

My dear wife grew up in a place that did not have modern conveniences; so did my grandparents. I am wise enough to learn from their experience.

blake said...

Well, you could just box in your unmentionables with big white sheets.

Robert said...

Meade, considering her fascist stand on shorts for men, the fact she is clearly a closet clothesist is no surprise whatsoever. Perhaps this blog should be renamed something like "The Accidental Aesthete". The movie would star Bonnie Hunt. Movies have been made from books, plays, songs, even a greeting card. Why not a blog?

Janis Gore said...

Wow, no one except for Prairie Wind remembers blue jean stretchers?

I'm way out of my league. Did you boys wear slacks or chinos in the fifties and sixties?

former law student said...

no one except for Prairie Wind remembers blue jean stretchers?

Remember? Pants stretchers are $15.95 if you buy two or more:

http://www.vermontcountrystore.com/browse/Home/Customer-Favorites/Household-Cleaning/Pants-Stretchers/D/30100/P/1:200:2020:20210/I/f01773

But my mom never used them for blue jeans, which my dad never wore. He wore "wash pants."

Largo said...

"""My clothes are hand laundered by Buddhists and as a result my clothes have the scent of curry on them.

thank you.
"""

Well Titus, my cloths are hand laundered by Buddhists, who then dry these clothes themselves by way of their super magic heat powers.

(Check two minutes into the video. Thank you.)

Largo said...

And Titus, I don't know if you saw my comment to you on this in a previous thread.

Let me say that I am very glad to see you back, and especially glad to see you ok (some of us were vaguely worried).

prairie wind said...

Movie from a blog. Part of it, anyway.

Terry said...

What I resent is playing on my eco-guilt, which I don't have, so that they can save a buck on laundry.

Mary Q Contrarie said...

The energy savings are substantial when you reduce the use of your clothes dryer. A laundry drying rack inside your house will give you substantial savings and you can still look like your nieghbors. I think you make a great point. People want to do what their tribe is doing. So we all need to consider how we can be leaders of our tribes and neighborhoods and if that means being the first to dry outside then go for it!