September 23, 2009

Speed Diavlogging.

There's a new Bloggingheads, with me and Emily Bazelon.

It's a really short one, because my computer died in the middle of our first attempt at recording.

ADDED: I blogged this with my iPhone, in my Outpatient Surgery enclosure at UW Hospital.

17 comments:

Rick Lee said...

Whenever a Mac user posts something about a computer problem, I'm always tempted to make a snide remark about how Macs are completely trouble-free and everything "just works"... because the reverse is what happens to us hapless Windows users whenever we post about a problem. Mac users always chime in and tell us to get a Mac and we wouldn't have these problems. But I would never post such a snide message because that would be wrong. :-)

bagoh20 said...

It's a good length. I watched it all for a change. I have a short attention span as per my male stereotype.

You ladies are wonderful. I don't know what you said, but I smiled all the way through. Is that bad or good?

Also, no, we do not need more emotion in our public speaking, it will always be questioned as inauthentic and usually will be.

I do think that public speaking in general is too fake in style for me. Obama for example, is very compelling when he's acting natural and speaking conversationally, but when he goes into that southern preacher thing as soon as the crowd makes noise, it creeps me out and I instantly what to say "You lie!".

Salamandyr said...

I think I could go with a little more fak-i-tude in public speaking, or at least a little complex sentence structure.

I would love to hear someone give a political speech that wasn't a succession of sound bytes interrupted by applause lines.

bagoh20 said...

Although I can't stand the man, my impression is that Barney Frank speaks pretty naturally.

It seems that most politicians adopt that Greek orator thing no matter what they are talking about. I'm not a public speaker in occupation or training, but I do need to speak occasionally to groups over a hundred. If I got anywhere near that tone, there would be laughing, despite the fact that I could fire the perpetrator. Of course I wouldn't, because I would laugh myself at such speaking.

It seems to me if you got something important to say and you know it's true, then just say it as you would to a friend who you are not trying to swindle. Maybe politicians talk that way, to distract from the message and just get that face time looking important. Actually, I think it's just habit from listening to each other do it.

john said...

Please. "...with XYZ and me."

traditionalguy said...

Feedback: Good length and boiled down to the intended subjects. Also no hostility by talking over the other or by using faked misunderstanding of the other. Definitely a Grade A Blogginghead. Hope you are back on your feet again soon.

Ignorance is Bliss said...

I vote against increaing the emotional content of political speeches.

And the male equivalent of the fake crying is the fake indignation and outrage.

bagoh20 said...

Another of the fake male version is the public sensitivity and new male persona followed 10 minutes later by the discussion of eye patch panties and conquest, or is it possible to be both?

Kylos said...

Rick Lee, as a Mac user for more than fifteen years, I can assure you I've gotten many more snide comments from touchy Windows users than I've ever given or heard from other Mac users. You're stuck in the nineties, my friend.

MikeR said...

Reagan used to use a "catch in his voice", always at a particular point in a given speech.
http://www.waltershapiro.com/3710/voice-inspired-america-vision-changed-the-world
I'm too young to remember his speeches, but I've heard this from others.
I think emotion is fine. Sobbing is too much already. The trouble with what Pelosi did was that what she was saying was ridiculous.

Hazy Dave said...

Shouldn't that be "Divavlogging" when it's U and MLE?

(Oh, wait, AJ Lynch came up with that last November. Nevermind.)

former law student said...

I enjoyed the good humor and camaraderie between Althouse and Bazelon, even when they disagree.

I think the male complement to tearing up for women is righteous anger. Both are warning signals that the speaker has reached the limit of composure, so back off buddy.

peter hoh said...

Is there a male equivalent? Try the current master of the art, Glenn Beck.

Shanna said...

Also, no, we do not need more emotion in our public speaking, it will always be questioned as inauthentic and usually will be.

Sometimes it works, but it's like seasoning, it should be used sparingly and only where it really fits. Like crying.

when he goes into that southern preacher thing as soon as the crowd makes noise, it creeps me out and I instantly what to say "You lie!".

Re: Obama, that fakey southern accent has been bugging the crap out of me since the campaign. I cringe when I think of his overly twangy "merci beaucoup". Gah. Please stop doing that. You are not souther, you are from Hawaii, Chicago and NY (oh, and indonesia). Stop it.

former law student said...

that fakey southern accent has been bugging the crap out of me since the campaign.

South Side represent!

The first summer factory job I had, it took me weeks to be able to understand the intonation of black Southsiders' speech, without saying "Huh?" every time.

I'd bet Obama adopted that accent to fit in, back in his community organizing days, just as he started going to Wright's church.

rhhardin said...

I prefer the longer version, where the subjects requiring extra tact aren't yet known.

This one is missing remedial niceness.

Penny said...

Just love these conversations. Ann and Emily were both charming, and perhaps more in agreement on many of these topics than we've seen on some, and if not that, then less in disagreement.

Althouse laid enough groundwork for an outspoken feminist to "rise" to the occasion, but Bazelon didn't take the bait. She simply countered with some other view to consider.