September 2, 2009

In the Queen Anne Tavern...

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... I hope you emerge.

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(Photo 2 by Meade.)

22 comments:

traditionalguy said...

Nice work capturing the beaury in nature, Sir Meade.

OldGrouchy Doug Wright said...

Royalty, begone!

David said...

It used to be called Lacy's Place.

EDH said...

If Althouse still credits Meade as Meade on this blog, then who was the photographer "M." credited in last night's "taking in" (or "going to") Woodstock post?

former law student said...

A feature of country drives in my Midwestern youth. Are there still plenty of roadside picnic tables, I wonder.

In the news, Mrs. Duggar is pregnant with her 19th child. The biggest boomer family I knew had nine kids. Can anyone explain the appeal of so many pregnancies? Having a housefull of kids is fun -- no argument there.

And Art Bell fans should rejoice to hear that a real chupacabra has reportedly been caught.

traditionalguy said...

EDH...Everyone knows that M is the issuer of special weapons to James Bond. M must have issued the digital camera.

former law student said...

Speaking of large families, there was a great letter to the editor in Tuesday's New York Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/01/opinion/l01kennedy.html

To the Editor:

Your article about large Irish families (“As With the Kennedys, the Large, Boisterous Irish Family Is Fading Into History,” news article, Aug. 29) provoked some reflection for me as the second of nine in such a family.

There are three gifts of being raised in a large Irish Catholic family that I believe strongly influenced the Kennedys and many others. First, being raised as one of a multitude caused me and my siblings to be intensely concerned with fairness and equity. I think that this child’s natural concern that the pie be divided equally deeply influenced the development of American politics in the last century, and the decline of that sentiment may be related to the decline of the large family.

Second was the Catholic religion, which many may have drifted from in a formal sense, but which instilled in almost all of us the idea that there was something higher and better that we ought to be striving for, that injustice, poverty, strife and untrammeled self-interest were not to be accepted as the natural state of humankind, and that communion with our fellow men and women was both a duty and the purpose of life.

Finally, there was the daily breakfast-table example that very different people really could live together, if not always in peace and tranquillity, then in love, laughter, hope and mutual appreciation.

I will treasure these gifts until the day I die.

Patrick Marren
Chicago, Aug. 29, 2009

David said...

"I will treasure these gifts until the day I die."

At which point he will find out if wandering away from God and religion to secular liberality was a good idea.

john said...

Curt Schilling has already pissed off the Boston sportwriters. Seems like he's serious about Teddy's seat.

And he was born in Alaska.

Donna B. said...

The idea that big families are a Catholic thing did not arise until childhood death became a thing of the past due to vaccinations and until reliable birth control became the norm.

Though nominally a Catholic, I had no aversion to birth control. I also did not have as many children as I wanted to have. (Specifically, I'm two short.)

And, while I am not in favor of making abortion illegal, I think it's disingenuous to say it is not a form of birth control.

Michael Hasenstab said...

Nice lace, Queen Ann.

campy said...

Everyone knows that M is the issuer of special weapons to James Bond

No, that's Q. M's the boss.

VW: pusivi Pusivi Galore was a Bond Girl.

knox said...

Should I give up on Top Chef or Project Runway posts?

NOT an effort to tell Althouse what to write about, just wondering ...

MPorcius said...

I'm not trying to tell Ann what to write about either, but I was hoping she would respond to the New York Times review of the Beatles videogame. The writer gushes about how the game is the most important video game of all time because of its association with the Beatles, and talks alot about how the Beatles have a "message" and a "worldview" that is "relevant today," though he doesn't come out and say what that message or worldview might be.

I was curious what Ann would make of the article, and particularly how she might characterize the Beatle's message or worldview.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/06/arts/television/06schi.html

traditionalguy said...

Campy...You are correct about the Bond characters names. That only makes the "M" tag better for Meade

campy said...

That only makes the "M" tag better for Meade

Does that mean Althouse has a License to Kill?

traditionalguy said...

Campy...Could be that The Professor is liscensed. I recall seeing her carry out several expert hits lately over the internet.

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Richard said...

Happy One Month Althouse & Meade!

former law student said...

Happy One Month Althouse & Meade!

If Meade goes by M., the Althouse house would become the M.Althouse. Then they could brew beer there and age it in the cellar (assuming there likely is one).

edutcher said...

Regarding fls' Times letter, the writer is obviously drinking from the same bottle of Guinness as the spinmeisters who crafted the Kennedy Myth.

Irish families fight - that's where whatever "fairness and equity" was won, and the Church taught observance of the Sacraments, not this pseudo lace curtain liberalism the writer has invented. Having grown up in my mother's house where 3 of her 6 siblings lived, I got to see the dynamic up close and personal

Anyone who is interested in how a real Irish family worked ought to take in the relationship between Victor McLaglen and Maureen O'Hara in "The Quiet Man".

PS What Richard said. My wife and I have a similar story, so I'm glad you found each other.

rhhardin said...

Orpheus's and Euridice's marriage L'Orfeo Monteverdi, the nicest solos I've heard of this part.

Just ordered the DVD.

I'm one of the opposite-downloaders - if I see something good on YouTube I order the thing.

I used to do high school homework listening to this opera (albeit Helmut Krebs' version).