July 27, 2009

At the Wild Grain Café....

... maybe you can calm down from your surrealistic weekend....

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... and come to terms with the reality of Monday....

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8 comments:

traditionalguy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
traditionalguy said...

Thanks for the great Althouse Blog that you do so well. The photos are the highlight everyday.

EDH said...

... maybe you can calm down from your surrealistic weekend....

... and come to terms with the reality of Monday....


Like really bad lip synching, Got to be Real?

Fred4Pres said...

I don't like Mondays.

Bissage said...

Those are positively superb photos.

That is a painfully obvious and extraordinarily banal thing to say.

It is remarkably true, nevertheless.

MadisonMan said...

That flattened snake would have been a good picture for the reality of Monday.

Chip Ahoy said...

Do you imagine that's the stuff, or something similar, einkorn, emmer, amaranth, kamut, millet, quinoa, buckwheat, barley, rye, or spelt, or rice, that ancient people collected, selectively cultivated, and formed into bread?

You know, anything you read on the subject states flatly ancient bread, painstakingly milled by hand between two stones was not leavened. But I say to that poppycock. Balderdash. Malarkey. Fiddle-faddle. Hooey. Nonsense. Yes, I say all those things to that. In places where wheat, and wheat-like grain with gluten was collected, cultivated, and milled, then the potential for leavened bread would have arose quite early in history. I know through repeated experience that a loose sponge can be inoculated with airborne yeast and bacteria within hours. And on a good warm day even that is not necessary as the grain was already inoculated in the field.

Beer is liquid bread. They arose in human history together. Likewise, some locations are so yeasty that yeast is not even added manually to beer. Inoculation occurs automatically by exposure to air. Although how bacteria is avoided is not clear to me. Possibly it's not. After all, it is the bacteria portion of so-called sourdough cultures and not the yeast portion that imparts to naturally fermented breads their unique characteristics and taste.

This is an endless source of fascination to me. Have I ever showed you my sexy yeast page? No? Nine tiny anims shoved together in a table with piano music showing haploid and diploid cell division orgy, in Spanish.

reader_iam said...

Having listened to the 911 tape of Lucia Whalen's call to police, I'm feeling rather riled, actually.

...no mention of black men
...mention of luggage on the porch in the context of Whalen saying the people might live there

...etc.