April 4, 2009

"Deep Purple, Thin Lizzy, Rush, Kiss, Ted Nugent, Iron Maiden, Motorhead."

Metallica's James Hetfield, celebrating his band's induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, names the artists he thinks belong their too.

Also: Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page played "Immigrant Song." Ron Wood, presenting Bobby Womack, told about the time "he and Womack hid as some Hells Angels gang members were roughing up Wilson Pickett." And Rosanne Cash said that Wanda Jackson "could really rock and still kept her femininity intact."

40 comments:

Peter V. Bella said...

Anyone who can be called the sweet lady with the nasty voice is alright by me.

Eli Blake said...

I'm shocked that Kiss isn't already there. What more do they have to do? Light Gene Simmons' tongue on fire?

The rest of those he mentioned are good, but I don't know about Hall Of Fame good.

Metallica does deserve to be there.

Peter V. Bella said...

When are the Hell's Angels going to be nominated for their contribution to rock culture?

Methadras said...

Motor and Iron Maiden should have been inducted long before Metallica.

Seven Machos said...

I second Eli's shock. That is absurd.

Eli Blake said...

And with all due respect to Roseanne Cash (and she does have my respect),

How is she hosting the show for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? Who are they going to invite next year? Yo-yo Ma?

Ron said...

I'd pick a guy who played the spoons over Thin Lizzy...

Revenant said...

Rush and Kiss aren't already in the Hall of Fame?

What's up with that.

Beth said...

I'll probably never know what Cash means when she says "she rocks, but keeps her femininity intact," but Wanda Jackson does indeed rock.

Why indeed is Rush not already in the Hall? But we could ask that for a lot of great musicians.

Joan said...

Good for Metallica. I never bought a single one of their albums but just reading the title "Enter Sandman" puts that tune firmly in my head. Nice and crunchy, that one was. Well, maybe not "nice". You know what I mean.

Rush deserves to get in purely on the basis of longevity at this point. They're still writing and producing new albums and still touring. I also think they deserve some kind of award for not writing any songs about sex, ever (unless they've changed recently.) They never sold out. I appreciate that I can listen to them when my kids are around and not have to worry about explaining any double- or triple-entendres in the lyrics.

Like everyone else, I'm shocked that Kiss isn't already in. That just makes no sense. They defined an era.

Last time I saw Jimmy Page, he appeared a bloated shadow of his former glorious self, all those years of hard living have taken their toll. Sad.

Revenant said...

I appreciate that I can listen to them when my kids are around and not have to worry about explaining any double- or triple-entendres in the lyrics.

Although you might end up hearing questions like "Mommy, could you buy me a copy of 'The Fountainhead'?". :)

Revenant said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Revenant said...

Actually Jimmy Page doesn't look too bad for a 65 year old.

Joan said...

Although you might end up hearing questions like "Mommy, could you buy me a copy of 'The Fountainhead'?". :)

You have a point. My library is long on Terry Pratchett and short on Ayn Rand... I believe I read all her novels (We the Living being the best, novel-wise, although the most depressing) but I never bought them, I just borrowed them from the hard-core Randians I knew.

One of my old roommates became an architect because she loved The Fountainhead so much. I think she missed the point of the story. My kids are a little young for Rand, although my oldest has enjoyed the Heinlein YA novels he's read.

OK, I'll cut Jimmy Page some slack. It's just weird that he should look so much like a grandpa. Robert Plant (with Alison Kraus) has held up much better and is only 4 or so years younger.

Revenant said...

You have a point. My library is long on Terry Pratchett and short on Ayn Rand

Heh! We've got that much in common, at least. :)

Robert Plant *must* be dyeing his hair. I can't believe he'd have a head of hair like that at age 60.

Pogo said...

Metal had limited allure for me. Beyond its ubiquitous signature songs, I never sought to mine that vein much further.

Ever the contrarian, my youth was instead misspent on Joy Division, Elvis Costello, Brian Eno, and Buddy Holly. Metal was for hockey players and potheads, at least in my high school. And that accounted for more than half the boys, so I had to find adolescent solace elsewhere.

But their names are as familiar as old classmates. So I am fond of them, at least for evoking the parking lot before two-a-day football practices, KISS blasting from a lineman's 1970 Torino Cobra.

We all listened to Freebird before games. Made us nuts.

EnigmatiCore said...

Kiss and Rush both need to be, and I am sure will be, in. The HoF seems to want to spread out the inductions of the biggies so that they have one each year.

As for Metallica, I recently saw them. It was not the sort of show I would normally have gone to, but I am very happy that I did as it was truly excellent.

John said...

Kiss certainly broke ground in stage shows but their music was bloody awful. They were lousy musicians and had few pop hooks and little to offer beyond attitude. Kiss does not belong in the HOF.

SteveR said...

I've made the point here before, but there should be no confusion about who is or is not in the Rock n Roll. If they could get people to Cleveland, Wishbone Ash and Mark Almond would be inducted. Its an entirely commercial enterprise.

EDH said...

Deep Purple, Thin Lizzy, Rush, Kiss, Ted Nugent, Iron Maiden, Motorhead.

Motley Crue is another prominent band that in my opinion was always more sizzle than steak. And, coincidentally, Vince Neil once left it to me to explain to the Hells Angels why they were no longer welcome backstage. Why invite them backstage in the first place, Mr. Leatherpants?

The evening ended with a jam for the ages as Metallica, Beck, Jimmy Page, Aerosmith's Joe Tyler and Flea brought the house down with a performance of the Yardbirds' ''Train Kept A Rollin.''

Would that be Aerosmith's Joe Perry or Steven Tyler?

Beth said...

Ever the contrarian, my youth was instead misspent on Joy Division, Elvis Costello, Brian Eno, and Buddy Holly.

Not misspent at all; that was an excellent use of your time, Pogo!

In my teens, the metalheads lived out in the suburbs, and could be recognized by their never-ending supply of black concert T-shirts. I was a city girl, so that wasn't my scene. I liked punk, but the so-called local punk rockers were all upper-class kids rebelling against their highly paid, professional and absent parents. They bought their Doc Martens on vacation in Britain, and their punk duds came from trips to the Village. I couldn't relate to that.

Daryl said...

Pssht. Everyone knows the Rock Hall of Fame sold out to pop stars long ago.

Which is not to say that Metallica does not belong. Or any other group listed by Mr. Hetfield.

Madonna? Not so much.

TMink said...

Good for Hetfield, I agree with him completely. Not that I particularly like Rush or Kiss or The Nuge, but those folks rocked and rocked hard. As does Metallica.

And Chicago is not in there.

Ridiculous.

Trey

XWL said...

The concept of a 'Rock and Roll Hall of Fame' has always seemed odd to me.

I was about to comment that, 'It's not like there's a Hall of Fame for Classical Music', then I googled it and turns out there IS an American Classical Music Hall of Fame in Cincinnati.

So I guess music halls of fame are an Ohio thing.

What's up with that?

Revenant said...

Kiss certainly broke ground in stage shows but their music was bloody awful. They were lousy musicians and had few pop hooks and little to offer beyond attitude. Kiss does not belong in the HOF.

Whatever you may think of their music or talent, it is indisputable that they were extremely popular and influential rock musicians. Which is sufficient reason to let them into the HOF even if you think their music sucks.

Personally I can't stand Metallica and think they've done exactly one good song ever. But there's no denying their influence.

William said...

There's about ten years in your youth when you're on top of things: Your hair is the cool style and length, you know music that only the select few are aware of, you know the right kind of margaritas to get drunk on. Then life happens and one's knowledge of the zeitgeist recedes and thins.....Heavy metal happened after my brief moment of hip. I was too much into my work for Unicef then to pay much attention to it. I am ignorant about most of the bands mentioned here, but it seems to me that everlasting fame isn't what it used to be. If you were young with Rush, Kiss, etc you will take them with you to your early grave. It doesn't seem that heavy metal has any cross over appeal to people who weren't there at the time. Gershwin, the Rolling Stones, Gilbert & Sullivan have all crossed generations and eras but the bands mentioned here will all die with their listeners. It seems sad that your moment of youth was memorialized with this trash. Thank God, today's young people have Mos Def and the Jonas Bros to record their greenest years.

Pogo said...

Beth, my New Wave look was entirely of Goodwill origins, with a soup├žon of Salvation Army. I did pay full price ($1.00!!) for a Fuck Art Let's Dance button from the Specials.

My parents weren't well off, so the only thing I was rebelling against, as I recall, were Styx and Journey and Bee Gees disco.

About 10 years ago, the nearby Civic Center had a KISS concert. All the black t-shirted young men walking in front of my house made me chuckle, but my next door neighbor eyed them darkly and said "KISS. Did you know that stands for 'Knights In Service to Satan?"

I replied, Well, wouldn't that be "KISTS?"

He gave me a flinty stare, so I said, "Well, they probably don't spell too good.

Yeesh.

Maguro said...

"KISS. Did you know that stands for 'Knights In Service to Satan?"

Heh, I remember that rumor well. Supposedly it stood for "Knights in Satan's Service", which at least matches up with the initials.

It seems like all the bands from that era had some kind of satanic vibe to them, including Rush. Lots of discussion back then about who was or wasn't a devil-worshipper...ah, the good old days.

Michael in Fort Worth said...

William, I'd have to disagree with your comment about metal not crossing generations. My teenagers and all their friends have "discovered" Metallica, Ozzy, AC/DC, Sabbath, and most of the other bands I listened to as a kid. Some of this is due to Guitar Hero and Rock Band, but some of it is just exploration on their own.

I realized a while back that to my parents, Ozzy was some kind of evil Satanist. To me and my friends, he was teenage rebellion. To my kids, he's a goofball who made some great music back in the day, and a pretty strong anti-drug message.

LoafingOaf said...

I watched that induction stuff last night. Nice they had it in Cleveland.

Anyway, I started crushing on Jeff Beck's bassist! I see on his web site her name is Tal Wilkenfeld. Mmm. Maybe I'll have to catch one of their gigs. (Oh, look, Jeff Beck just started a blog of his own.)

(BTW, Jeff Beck plays on Morrissey's fine new album -- and Morrissey sure deserves a spot in that Hall. Though I doubt he'd show up to accept.)

So why did they broadcast this event on a crap channel like Fuse? Their sound was all messed up during the Beck/Page jamming.

In an interview with the Fuse people, they asked Beck to give advice to a young guitarist starting out. He said it was a bit late in the game, not sure anything new can be done on the guitar.

EnigmatiCore said...

"I realized a while back that to my parents, Ozzy was some kind of evil Satanist. To me and my friends, he was teenage rebellion. To my kids, he's a goofball who made some great music back in the day, and a pretty strong anti-drug message."

Oddly, everyone was right.

Penny said...

Oaf, I agree with you about Jeff Beck's bass player. She knocked my socks off when I watched Eric Clapton's last Crossroad's festival live stream. Granted she got a lot more of my attention because she was riding sidekick to Jeff Beck, who on any given night, just might be my all time favorite guitarist ever.

Part of the beauty was watching a true legend, bringing up the next generation. She was so young and yet so competent. I felt like I was watching her wings grow that night.

rdkraus said...

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ?

I dunno, that is SO WRONG. Everything about rock and roll says no to having a "corporate" type "hall of fame." It's un-rock and roll.

In Cleveland?

Double wrong.

Rosanne Cash?

No offense, but triple wrong.

Yeechhhh.

orlandorey said...

Rush--"The Trees"
(apparently inspired by Ayn Rand)
There is unrest in the forest,
There is trouble with the trees,
For the maples want more sunlight
And the oaks ignore their pleas.

The trouble with the maples,
(And they're quite convinced they're right)
They say the oaks are just too lofty
And they grab up all the light.
But the oaks can't help their feelings
If they like the way they're made.
And they wonder why the maples
Can't be happy in their shade.

There was trouble in the forest,
And the creatures all have fled,
As the maples scream "Oppression!"
And the oaks just shake their heads

So the maples formed a union
And demanded equal rights.
"The oaks are just too greedy;
We will make them give us light."
Now there's no more oak oppression,
For they passed a noble law,
And the trees are all kept equal
By hatchet, axe, and saw.

muddimo said...

William, you apparently do not know many teenagers. AC/DC and Metallica T-shirts abound.

Anthony said...

I dunno, that is SO WRONG. Everything about rock and roll says no to having a "corporate" type "hall of fame." It's un-rock and roll.

I've always thought this way, too.

I dunno if Rush ought to be in, even though they are one of my all-time faves and they are some of the best musicians around. They seem to have had limited appeal outside of the AoR crowd. Hard to say what criteria should be considered for induction. I think gobs and gobs of musicians were influenced by Thin Lizzy, but were they ever very popular? Kiss was wildly popular, but were they any good or influential?

Chicago was on The Chris Isaak Hour (on Biography channel, check it out, excellent program) last week and they were talking about their not being inducted. I think they were saying they're the first American group to show up on the list of most #1 songs or something. They seemed to have the right attitude about it though, that they didn't really want to diss the HoF, but they've been doing what they love for 40 years, selling tons of records, and still touring to good crowds and isn't that really the point?

Beth said...

Pogo, we would have gotten along fine as teenagers. I still laugh about a Rolling Stone review way back that described Steve Perry's voice as a "tortured mosquito."

The kids are alright today, too, and not all under the sway of corporate radio. One of my students plans his week around practicing Rush guitar solos. He tends to reference Ron Paul a lot in his papers; there may be a Libertarian - Rush correlation - if memory serves, I think some of the writers at Reason magazine are Rush fans. Anyway, it's fun to talk music with 18-year-olds who have a broad palette, as it were.

Anthony said...

Rush wrote quite a few songs with a warning-about-authoritarianism tone to them. Someone mentioned The Trees above, but also Red Barchetta about a world where private cars were banned, and 2112, about a similarly authoritarian regime in the far future. According to Wikipedia, the latter included the credit: "Neil Peart credits 'With acknowledgment to the genius of Ayn Rand.'"

LoafingOaf said...

rdkraus, while I agree with you that the Rock Hall is lame, corporate, and un-rock 'n' roll, what exactly has you all worked up about Roseanne Cash introducing Wanda Jackson? Wanda Jackson used to tour with her father....

It did seem like Metallica (like most every other rock star nowadays) are a bit too interested in trophies, so maybe, on second thought, it is fitting that such a corporate institution now exists. And I guess that's what you gotta expect from a band releasing a video game this year. They didn't "kick my ass" or make my "face melt" -- they bored me with their ten millionth performance of "Enter Sandman"....

Oh, why is it a double wrong to have the hall in Cleveland? Cleveland had as good a claim as any other city, and they happened to have wanted it more than any other city.

Will said...

Motorhead,Iron Maiden and Thin Lizzy are a million times better then Metallica