October 27, 2008

Ted Stevens, guilty on all charges.

Not surprising, based on what I read about the evidence.

39 comments:

integrity said...

Yahoo! From what I read he deserved every one of those guilty verdicts. And perhaps more.

Nice Going Ted! And 7 days out from an election. Excellent work.

TosaGuy said...

Good Riddence. He represents the worst in politicians in both parties. Hopefully, Charlie Rangel will become his cellmate.

froggyprager said...

even if the guy did nothing wrong, he should have taken himself out of the election a long time ago. Not smart.

Palladian said...

Richly deserved.

Palladian said...

One down, 99 to go!

mccullough said...

Wow, a United States Senator whose corrupt friend helped him with his home. Next up, Sen. Barack Obama.

Kylos said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Kylos said...

Palladian, heh.

Anyone know what the ramifications of this are? Is there any law Federal or Alaskan that will force him out, or will the party force him to resign or will it be up to the entire Senate? Or will he get to stick around? I was under the impression that these were felony charges, so I would guess that he's going to get the boot somewhere down the road.

AJ Lynch said...

Hopefully, he will got to jail for many years and he is made to forfeit his pension.

mccullough said...

W. will pardon him on Christmas eve, along with former Illinois Gov. George Ryan.

Unfortunately, this guy won't spend a day in prison.

Anyone seen a comment from Colin Powell yet about his reaction to the conviction of his friend with the sterling character and unquestionable integrity.

Simon said...

The more important issue is what happens now. Is there any way to substitute someone else onto the ballot, and if there isn't, what happens next? For example, if Stevens' colleagues do what they should have done long ago and lock him in the capitol basement until he signs his resignation letter, and Palin appoints, say, Charlie Huggins. Could Huggins' name be put on the ballot - literally or metaphorically - in place of Stevens'?

Simon said...

mccullough, if I were W., I'd issue a pardon for Powell's involvment in a "classified matter." Let the left go berzerk trying to figure out what it was.

Simon said...

(Tongue in cheek for that last comment, obviously.)

ElcubanitoKC said...

I hope he doesn't fall into a golden cage.

Doyle said...

Anyone seen a comment from Colin Powell yet about his reaction to the conviction of his friend with the sterling character and unquestionable integrity.

I think Powell needs to worry about the disastrous war he helped sell and apologizing for that before his terrible endorsement of Ted Stevens.

miller said...

The Constitution specifies how Senators can be expelled/impeached. I don't think that the Republican Party itself can "force" him out; they'll have to follow the constitutional rules.

One less (R) to hold the next Senate in line, unfortunately.

Power corrupts, aina.

SteveR said...

Well Palladian, I willing to concede there might be a couple good ones, but probably one hands worth at most. Probably the best thing about Obama-Biden winning. Don't go away mad, Ted.

miller said...

I'm not sure that the Constitution forbids a felon from becoming a Senator, does it?

I think the only thing that can be done constitutionally is to impeach him; barring that, the new Senate can choose not to accept his re-election (should he be re-elected).

But I don't know. I imagine wikipedia will be busy today.

hdhouse said...

isn't he still on the ticket there? this was his election cycle wasn't it?

snidley whiplash anyone?

TMink said...

"I think Powell needs to worry about the disastrous war he helped sell and apologizing for that before his terrible endorsement of Ted Stevens."

Powell was a peacenick during Vietnam??????

Wow, you think you know a guy.

Trey (hee hee)

mccullough said...

The Senate should get together and expel this guy today, whether or not he gets re-elected.

But these guys cover for each other. And there's got to be a "there but for the grace of God go I" feeling in that chamber.

TMink said...

I think Snidley Whiplash would confuse the voters who would think they are voting for Stevens all over again!

I move Dudley Doright.

Trey

Simon said...

miller said...
"I'm not sure that the Constitution forbids a felon from becoming a Senator, does it?"

No. Moreover, if a state tried to impose such a rule, it'd run afoul of Thornton, and if Congress tried to impose such a rule it'd run afoul of Powell.

Simon said...

Sorry, I lapsed into shorthand; to clarify: U.S. Term Limits, inc. v. Thornton and Powell v. McCormack.

john said...

Doyle said -
I think Powell needs to worry about the disastrous war he helped sell and apologizing for that before his terrible endorsement of Ted Stevens.

Don't worry, Doyle. All is forgiven, all has been pardoned. He may even get that invite to the cool kids lunchtable.

Kylos said...

"No. Moreover, if a state tried to impose such a rule, it'd run afoul of Thornton, and if Congress tried to impose such a rule it'd run afoul of Powell."

Simon, in what way can he then be removed? I'm not by any means familiar with such proceedings. Is impeachment or resignation or being voted out his only way out? If he goes to jail, can he still maintain his seat if he decides not to resign and is not impeached (yeah, i know such a scenario is a real stretch)?

blake said...

So...what's the penalty?

Two week suspension from the Senate golf course?

Simon said...

Kylos,
Members of Congress can't be impeached, but they can be ejected by a two thirds vote of the house to which they belong. Given that the prospect of a convicted felon in the minority caucus is too juicy a propaganda tool for the majority party for them to support removal, Stevens is likely safe from expulsion. His term expires 1/3/09, however, and he is seeking reelection. This week, the jury voted against him; next week, the electorate weighs in, and since I doubt they will elect a convicted felon, we can say his days are numbered.

Assuming that Stevens is obstinate and refuses to resign, there's little that can be done to prevent his serving out his term. Whether his colleagues will pressure him to resign - now - likely depends on whether Alaska law allows some way to salvage this fiasco (can a candidate withdraw and their party substitute another candidate, for example - and not only do so, but do so at the eleventh hour?).

mccullough said...

Apparently that Harvard law degree didn't do Stevens any good.

He should have gone to Yale.

MadisonMan said...

Stevens is 84. I wonder if he'll pull a Kenneth Lay.

If you had read the article, you would see that there is no rule barring felons from serving in the Senate. It requires a 2/3rd majority to expel a member.

I assume he will appeal. My prediction is that he will never serve a day in jail.

Kylos said...

Thanks Simon,
I was thinking just as you were that the Dems may not support impeachment just to embarrass republicans. You'd think that he would be ejected by the voters, but he is good at bringing the bacon home (though he'll probably have a much more difficult time with that now), so I guess I wouldn't be too surprised if he wasn't kicked out (that being said without knowing his current standing in the polls).

So, if he doesn't resign, something along the lines of Toricelli and Lautenberg would have to take place. Do you think the Republicans would be allowed a free pass on that since the Dems seem to have gotten one?

SteveR said...

Apparently that Harvard law degree didn't do Stevens any good.

I disagree, he's been scamming the system since statehood and just now getting convicted at 84. Heck I wouldn't be surprised to learn he smokes and eats red meat and trans fat.

Simon said...

Kylos said...
"You'd think that he would be ejected by the voters, but he is good at bringing the bacon home."

Yep - and that's the problem. There's little electoral cachet for individual members in resisting pork, and so the incentive structure inevitably perpetuates pork.

EDH said...

My most lasting impression of Stevens was when I saw him years ago on TV (CSPAN?) sitting behind someone speaking in the senate. Stevens was the background. He started picking his nose with his thumb.

Weeks later, I saw Stevens again sitting in the same place behind another speaker. This time, obviously knowing he was on camera again, Stevens produced some sort of nose hair trimmer, and in elaborate fashion he proceeded to explain the device to the guy next to him (who appeared to know what Stevens was attempting to do and didn't seem very interested in being part of it).

All of this kabuki for the camera as if to demonstrate "it wasn't a pick!" it was a hair.

Unlike Seinfeld, however, he knew he couldn't claim a lack of nasal penetration, so the hair defense.

So, I'm not surprised to hear Stevens would try to split (nose) hairs in his corruption defense.

Jen Bradford said...

Doyle - I had the same reaction. So many people were impressed by Powell's endorsement of Obama, and all I could think of was his testimony that Stevens' word was "sterling".

Titushasabigmeetingtoday said...

This is devastating.

I loved the old gizzard.

I will miss the hulk ties.

He deserved so much better.

What a way to end an illustrious career.

I am heartbroken.

Harwood said...

What a strange world we live in. This scumbag of a convicted felon can still run for the Senate, and keep serving if wins. As a senator, he can vote on bills that become the law of the land, but he can't vote in the election that gave him that power.

AlphaLiberal said...

I like how the case reveals the corrupt workings of oil companies. How many other Senators have taken gifts from the oil companies?

And, the long list of corrupt Republicans grows more. When will Tom Delay let the jury have their say?

knowitall said...

They're so many corrupt officials, and if Palin got in, they all would be exposed, even the saints we know as the left-wing illuminati.