October 2, 2008

Influential sunset.

This sunset changed my mind about a key component of how I spend my time.

DSC09494

Later, I saw this:

DSC09495

It wasn't related.

Was it?

Here's the song that happened to be on the "Cigarettes and Chocolate Milk" channel of the Pandora app on the iPhone I was playing as I hurried home to blog the photographs. But first, I put some water on to boil and threw various ingredients into a pot to make a sauce, which I half-burned while tweaking the photographs. Now the post is done and so is the pasta. The burning will be considered one extra ingredient. Fortuitous.

11 comments:

Trooper York said...

No if you burn it, just call it Cajun. That's what they do in all the best restaurants in New York.

Ron said...

What Trooper said: It's 'blackened.'

My creme brulee Bologanase is fabled in song and story!

ricpic said...

Drama at dusk,
The day's last hurrah --
Dark down below
'Neath a faint Venus star.

Meade said...

Accidents Will Happen

Apathetic Citizen said...

Miles Davis: Jack Johnson

Trooper York said...

Drama at dusk
Burned sauce in the pan
Debate watch a must
My roonies so wan.

rhhardin said...

This sunset changed my mind about a key component of how I spend my time.

Listen to more Wagner?

Simon said...

Ann - Could you elaborate?

chickenlittle said...

Nick Reynolds, founding member of the original Kingston Trio, has died. :(

bearbee said...

This sunset changed my mind about a key component of how I spend my time.

Winter a comin'. Time for light therapy.

Nice photo juxtaposition.

bill said...

Seriously, the misinformation that floats around here is astonishing. Blackened does not equal cajun cooking. While I'm at it, New Orleans also does not equal cajun.

Blackened redfish was a dish created by Paul Prudhomme for his New Orleans restaurant (K-Paul, which was as much creole as cajun). Nowadays, most restaurants try to pass off spicy seasonings light seared as blackened. This is a moral failing of the cook.

It is true that Paul Prudhomme is cajun and for more on that I'd recommend reading The Prudhomme Family Cookbook: Old-Time Louisiana Recipes by the Eleven Prudhomme Brothers and Sisters and Chef Paul Prudhomme. While it does have recipes, it's less a cookbook than a compendium of cajun life. It's out of print and can be picked up dirt cheap.