September 27, 2008

What are some irrational things that's intelligent, educated people believe in?

For example, I know law professors who believe in astrology.

232 comments:

1 – 200 of 232   Newer›   Newest»
Palladian said...

Anthropogenic climate change.

Palladian said...

Transubstantiation.

rhhardin said...

That somebody seems to mean well makes him Presidential material.

Palladian said...

Barack Obama.

Meade said...

That Bill Ayers was just a guy in my neighborhood.

Palladian said...

Socialism.

Palladian said...

Sub-prime mortgages.

El Presidente said...

I know law professors that believe socialism is a workable form of government.

Jennifer Whatnot said...

That four-leafed clovers bring you luck and there might be a leprechaun at the end of that rainbow.

Also, winning the lottery.

El Presidente said...

I know movie stars that believe people care about their political thoughts.

Buford Gooch said...

Unniversal ealth care.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people believe Bush squandered the warm affection of the rest of the world, chiefly Europe, namely France, Germany, and Britain.

Additionally rational people believe foreign policy of USA should be shaped by what they read as the opinions of other nations in aggregate.

El Presidente said...

Hey Palladian,

Transubstantiate this.

Palladian said...

Astrology is an obvious one. I've been shocked at how many smart, educated people I've met who believe in astrology. When someone asks me "What's your sign?" I always want to reply "I don't know, but asking me that question is a good sign that you're not worth talking to".

Ann Althouse said...

For a specific purpose, to be revealed later, it would help if we got out of the political opinion category and into things that science can attack and disprove. Helpful, also, to put religion to the side.

Palladian said...

God.

Palladian said...

Oops, now I'm just making trouble. Sorry Althouse.

Jamie said...

Every law professor at Regent University at least paid lip service to Creationism. I am sure a few actually believed in it.

Ann Althouse said...

Palladian, I did that once, told a guy I couldn't take him seriously because he believed in astrology, and when I proceeded to tell the story to one friend and then another, both told me they believed in astrology.

Meade said...

That IQ + education = wisdom, judgement, courage, integrity, dedication.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people believe the lower atmosphere is largely free of yeast cells and bacteria and are therefore surprised that it can be easily captured, cultivated and used to make things like bread and beer.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people believe malt is a substance and not a process.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people believe the moon landing was a gigantic hoax foisted by the US government.

Palladian said...

Herbal supplements. I know quite a few people, even people in medicine-related fields (though not doctors) who "believe" in herbal supplements. I'm not impugning the possibility that there is some merit to the medicinal properties of some herbs and plants, but many of them, and the claims made about them, are not backed up by scientific study.

HeaventreeofStars said...

Religious mumbo-jumbo of any sort is the obvious answer.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people believe the US is responsible for two jet airliners flying into the World Trade Center. They use as proof their confusion about another close-by tower that also collapsed but wasn't hit. That all five planes were coordinated by an administration they already hold in contempt for being incompetent.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people believe a return to the gold standard will stabilize global economy. Rather than say, an economy based on white ibis plumes.

ricpic said...

The Mets. I continue to believe in the Mets.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people honestly believe Bush's administration is the worst in all of history !!! one !!1!!!!!!

Palladian said...

Anthropogenic climate change.

But I repeat myself.

I know very intelligent people who believe all sorts of absolutely tenuous hypotheses related to how the "sins of man" are destroying the environment. And I don't mean accepting the various ways that man is altering myriad micro-environments through bad policy and illegal dumping and overdevelopment and such, but wacky, Algorian theories about giant tidal waves and such.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people believe it would have been better to allow Sadam Hussein remain alive, in power, and for his sons to perpetuate a dynasty.

Meade said...

"For example, I know law professors who believe in astrology."

Do they really believe in astrology as an organizing principle or just as a way of getting laid?

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people believe the world would be a better, less hostile place, that the Islamic world would be mollified, if Israel didn't exist.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people believe Palin said, "I can see Russia from my house."

AJ Lynch said...

That life expectancy can be increased significantly in the near future.

Instapundit is one of the believers or perhaps I should put him in the hope/belief category.

El Presidente said...

Pallidian,

You mean Piltdown warming. It is shocking what ideology and bad science can come up with.

AJ Lynch said...

That Althouse is real.

Palladian said...

Oh yes Chip! How could I forget 9-11 denialists! I was at a party with a (liberal) architect friend of mine once and we were absolutely shocked when a group of people started talking about how 9-11 was a "lie" and that Israel was involved and thermite charges planted in the buildings and the absence of a jet at the Pentagon and how "fire doesn't melt steel". My friend absolutely savaged them, he being an architect and familiar with engineering. They were shocked, as if no one had ever challenged them on their stupidity before. It was a very bizarre scene.

Freeman Hunt said...

Auras (A scientist from the FDA once started reading my aura on a plane flight. Weird.), ghosts, spiritual vibrations from crystals, vaccines causing autism, organic produce being far far more healthy than non-organic, sunscreen causing more cancer than the sun, and witchcraft (Started flipping through a silly book someone had in college, and he called, "Do not say that word in there. I'm not kidding. It's dangerous." Please.)

I'm sure I'll think of more.

dr kill said...

Homeopathic 'medicine'. Bwwwaaaahhhhahahahahaha.

Crystal healing and gemstone therapy.

Pyramid therapy, aromatherapy, tarot, palmistry.

And, while I'm ranting, how about The Discovery Channel and The History Channel turning into The Ghost and Unfound Monster Channels?

They say that at the time of the American Revolution it was possible for a well-educated man to know everything there was to know. Now it isn't even possible to everything in your own area of expertise.

I'm OK with that. I don't need a supernatural explanation to help me sleep at night. I mock those that do, they deserve to be mocked.

ricpic said...

Maybe on a clear day Palin can see Russia from her house. Depends on what bering she takes. Get it? Bering?

I swear, sometimes I slay myself.

Palladian said...

Ghosts are real, man. Just ask Sir Archy.

Palladian said...

"I swear, sometimes I slay myself."

After that joke, we wish you would.

Pogo said...

Ghosts.
Bigfoot.
Ouija boards.
Communicating with the dead.
Marxism.
Socialism.
Conspiracy theories.
Scientology.

ricpic said...

Fire cuts paper.

ricpic said...

Now be nice, pallidman.

Freeman Hunt said...

That quantum theory supports the belief that one controls his surroundings through suggestion al a "What the Bleep Do We Know?" (A doctor recommended that movie to me as an example of a constructive dialog between science and religion. I watched it, and then emailed him to say that it was a dialog between pseudoscience and the Ramtha cult.)

tjl said...

Otherwise rational, intelligent people who believe that assorted New Agey rituals, chants, aromatherapies and whatnot, will aid their well-being. They're particularly thick on the ground in places like Santa Fe.

chickenlittle said...

talismans, the New York Times, Andrew Sullivan

rhhardin said...

Two-pronged approaches.

Fran said...

Getting a chill causes the common cold.
A positive attitude can overcome most illnesses.
God rewards their own good behavior.
Their own children are brilliant but make bad grades because their school doesn't challenge them. Children of others are simply dumb or lazy.
Expensive cosmetics will eliminate wrinkles.
Certain foods can cure/treat cancer while chemo is "poison."

Palladian said...

"Certain foods can cure/treat cancer while chemo is "poison.""

Well, Chemo is basically poison. That's why it works :)

EDH said...

Politically connected people who move in and out of government and high paying jobs in the private sector and believe it's because they're so talented, and by doing so it will help them to do their work on behalf of the "little guy" against greedy corporations.

Ah, what am I saying? Even they don't believe that shit.

zeek said...

Voting for Bush in 2004.

Meade said...

"What are some irrational things that's intelligent, educated people believe in?"

That if something is not rational, it's not real.

love
grace
charity
freedom
justice
karma

rhhardin said...

Four leaf clovers. See the Bob and Ray four leaf clover farmer hard luck story (YouTube, last half of the clip).

KLDAVIS said...

The acai berry?

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people believe grinding moose is the only thing that can be done with moose meat, thus the word, "mooseburger". They're omitting. This is a shocking lack of imagination. For instance ...

* Moose tartare
* Moose sushi
* Moose Yankee pot roast
* Moose steaks
* Moose shish kabob
* Moose souvlaki
* Moose meatballs
* Moose meatloaf
* Moose stir fry
* Thai moose
* Moose soup
* Moose sandwiches
* Moose a al king
* Moose pie
* Moose pasties
* Moose jerky
* Moose sausage
* Cured moose
* Moose ravioli
* Moose roll ups
* Moose tacos
* Moose pierogis
* Moose goulash
* Moose ratatouille
* Moose fricassee
* Moose dumplings
* Moose au vin
* Moose meuniere
* escalloped Moose
* Moose omelet
* Moose souffle
* Moose quiche

...to name but a few off the top of my head.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people believe somehow gay marriages weaken the concept and the institution of marriage. They support this position with the slippery slope argument.

Pogo said...

Bubba: Anyway, like I was sayin', moose is the fruit of Alaska. You can barbecue it, boil it, broil it, bake it, sautee it. Dey's uh, moose-kabobs, moose creole, moose gumbo. Pan fried, deep fried, stir-fried. There's pineapple moose, lemon moose, coconut moose, pepper moose, moose soup, moose stew, moose salad, moose and potatoes, moose burger, moose sandwich.

That- that's about it.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people believe old dogs cannot be taught new tricks. This is demonstrated to be false.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational people believe parrots know what they're saying.

Meade said...

"I know law professors who believe in astrology."

This should not really come as a surprise. Recall the old joke: Ask an architect, an accountant, and an attorney for the sum of 2 + 2.

Architect: 4 (plus or minus).
Accountant: 4.00
Attorney: *pulls down the shade, scoots up his chair*

"Now, what would you like it to be?"

erniecu73 said...

Socialism

Che Guevara

Hugo Chavez

Fidel Castro

9-11 was an inside job

That they are smarter than anyone else, therefore they are the one's who should be chosen to select the way of living and the governance of the lesser beings around them.

That George Clooney, Sean Penn and Russell Crowe are good actors.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational intelligent people believe God punishes nations for being bad.

* AIDS epidemic
* Violent storms
* Tornados
* Earthquakes

erniecu73 said...

Dr. Phil

Dr. Laura

Deepak Chopra

Oprah

Rosie O'donnell

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational Intelligent people believe the health care system in Cuba is better than the one in the United States, and further, that nationalized health care systems in general are an improvement over a privately owned competitive system.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational intelligent people believe Capitalism is bad and fated to eventually disappear.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational intelligent people honestly believe dictators hell-bent on hegemony can be reasoned with rationally.

Chip Ahoy said...

Intelligent, educated people honestly believe Barney Frank and Edward Kennedy have been good for America generally because they always look out for the little guy.

Joan said...

Hey, aromatherapy isn't a philosophy, it's just a way to make the world smell a little better. Isn't it? I really like those Bath & Body Works lotions, but the candles give me a headache.

Michael Medved believes in Big Foot, Megan McCardle believes in AGW. I hate it when people say things that make me have to re-evaluate my opinions of them.

Trumpit said...

You're a bloghog, Palladian. I don't don't know if I coined the term, but you're it. You're also uninformed in the worst way - same as those that believe in astrology. Your comments about herbs as being useless medicinally is so STUPID that it's beyond the pale. Let's start with ASPRIN which was discovered in the bark of the Willow tree. I'll add another longer comment about herbal medicine later after I come back from Chinatown, here in L.A., with herbs prescribed by my Chinese doctor for a stomachache, that you caused, Palladian. Millions of Chinese depend on a 2,000 year old practice that is backed up by modern science for the bulk of their medicinal needs, for every condition that you can think of. You're an ignorant bloghog, Palladian, and you're no Paul Newman, either. You suck by comparison.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational, intelligent people believe that filling out the product registration activates their warranty, and further, that the information they're providing will not be use to bombard them with further product information nor will the information be sold.

Chip Ahoy said...

Rational, intelligent, educated people honestly believe the next version of Windows is automatically an improvement over the previous version because it's newer. This line of reasoning falls prey to several formal fallacies.

Trumpit said...

Chip Ahoy commented 19 times so far in this thread. He qualifies for the term bloghog. Disgustingly uninformed, too. Bloghogs are really worse than trolls because they tend to be bloviatingly uninformed loudmouths. MCG is a terrible troll and bloghog, too.

Trumpit said...

Excuse me, bloghog, Chip. You have over 20 worthless comments so far, and counting...

Chip Ahoy said...

Intelligent, educated people believe gays should be barred from military service, citing the reason that it would be bad for morale and that it would deteriorate discipline or generally become disruptive, but then, displaying astounding cognitive dissonance, flock to the movie "300", a film which incidentally produces 90 million hits.

Meade said...

That Palladian causes stomachaches curable by using Chinese herbs. Wait, did you say "intelligent?"

Never mind.

chickenlittle said...

Opinion polls

Seven Machos said...

That it's categorically evil for grown men to wear shorts.

oldirishpig said...

Chip Ahoy and Pogo both missed the obvious:

Chocolate Moose

(Sorry.)

Chip Ahoy said...

Good people, rational, intelligent and educated, honestly believe individuals that were elevated through aggressive outreach programs of affirmative action into professional fields do not weaken those professions by mediocrity, and that if those professional fields are weakened it's a small price to pay to eliminate racial injustice.

Further, they believe, in the social sense, it's reasonable for sons and daughters to pay for the sins and errors of their fathers and mothers, and further further, that this activity will somehow finally eliminate a nagging sense of guilt.

These are deeply held beliefs and they're not to be messed with.

Chip Ahoy said...

Intelligent, educated, perfectly reasonable people believe that men and women who volunteer for military service are violent by nature and were probably beaten as children.

rhhardin said...

That you balance a bicycle by leaning.

That a gyroscope resists forces. Call it gyroscope spin.

That airplanes fly owing to bernoulli's principle.

Chip Ahoy said...

Perfectly intelligent and educated people believe that women who wear short skirts, and revealing tops or otherwise provocative clothing, are actually provoking men to attack them. They believe these women are somehow asking to be raped not just desiring to be attractive to the outside world.

Chip Ahoy said...

Intelligent, educated people believe teaching toddlers sex education that goes well beyond wariness of strangers is a good idea.

Chip Ahoy said...

Intelligent educated people believe Milton Friedman and his whole Free to Choose economic theory chupa la iguana muy grande.

Chip Ahoy said...

Come to think of it, intelligent educated people believe Americans are so insular they speak only one language.

Chip Ahoy said...

Intelligent, educated people think oldirishpig is hilarious, and they're right!

Summer Anne said...

- no moon landing.
- ghosts are a big one. i'm always surprised by how many people believe in ghosts.
- 'power animals'
- universal symbology in dreams
- collective unconscious
- high school shootings are marilyn manson's fault
- rock musicians are often serious satanists
- 'serious' satanists
- soulmates

Peter V. Bella said...

Rational people think Chip is irrational today.

Intelligent, educated people believe Trumpit is clinically insane.

Palladian said...

Trumpit, I know it's probably difficult to read well through the Thorazine haze, but do try:

"I'm not impugning the possibility that there is some merit to the medicinal properties of some herbs and plants, but many of them, and the claims made about them, are not backed up by scientific study."

I know the history of aspirin, Trumpy. I'll also note that most people who benefit from aspirin today aren't chewing willow bark or drinking willow tea to get it, either. The benefits of salicylates were discovered and isolated and eventually manufactured in a form with far more therapeutic benefit than willow in a natural state possesses. Herbalism, like many other ancient quasi-mystical practices, may have been the genesis of modern pharmaceuticals but, well, a lot has changed since then. Alchemy was the precursor of modern chemistry but you'd be hard-pressed to find organic chemists who are mixing the Black Sun and the Red Lion in their Retorts in a modern lab.

"I'll add another longer comment about herbal medicine later after I come back from Chinatown, here in L.A., with herbs prescribed by my Chinese doctor for a stomachache, that you caused, Palladian."

See: placebo effect. Ancient Chinese secret, huh?

1jpb said...

Their personal greatness, correctness, and importance.

peter hoh said...

Feng shui

EMFs cause childhood cancers

crop circles

The proper use of apostrophes

mrs whatsit said...

The big one among my friends is homeopathy. I believe I am the only one of my old friends from college -- all well-educated people with demanding professions -- who does not believe in it and spend money on it.

People have so many wacky food beliefs that I can't keep track of them all. In particular, lately I seem to be meeting a frightening number of people who think raw milk is healthier than pasteurized milk. (I live on a dairy farm, so this subject comes up.)

peter hoh said...

There are a host of food-related beliefs. For some, I'm not certain which is the irrational belief.

chocolate causes acne

high fructose corn syrup is/is not just the same as sugar

margarine is/is not better for you than butter

mrs whatsit said...

Wait, it's irrational to believe in the proper use of apostrophes? Why?

veni vidi vici said...

Chip: "rational people believe a return to the gold standard will stabilize global economy. Rather than say, an economy based on white ibis plumes."

I'd like my economy in tulips, please!

AllenS said...

That a dry martini is actually dry.

D'oh! That Pelosi is in charge of the senate.

Lawgiver said...

Scientology.

Mark said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Eric said...

I used to play a lot of poker, and it never ceased to amaze me how many otherwise intelligent people believe in luck. Lucky hats, lucky shirts, some lucky talisman they put on their cards...

I know people who believe if you flip a normal coin ten times and it comes up "heads" every time, the eleventh flip is almost guaranteed to be "tails".

chickenlittle said...

@Peter Hoh: :)'s

Christy said...

Worked with a world class physicist, workaholic, whose only form of relaxation was to sunbathe. Totally discounted evidence of sun causing cancer.

Count me as one who believes getting wet and chilled causes a cold. I swear to you every time I get caught out skiing in the rain and get wet and chilled I come down with a cold. Last cold I caught was after getting caught in a chilling rain while snorkling. I never get colds else-wise. I understand the evidence, but I believe that co-factors we don't understand together cause the cold.

Eric Muller said...

Their own cruel neutrality.

rhhardin said...

That experts know anything about anything.

``I have arrived at what I call Thurber's Law, which is that scientists don't really know anything about anything. I doubt everything they have ever discovered. I don't think that light has a speed of 7,000,000 miles per second at all (or whatever the legendary speed is). Scientists just think light is going that fast, because they are afraid of it. It's so terrible to look at. I have always suspected that light just plodded along, and now I am positive of it.''

Thurber cited by Vicki Hearne in the link.

Mark said...

Foibles: funny.

Rank condescension: not so much.

peter hoh said...

Mrs. Whatsit, my 11:59 is a riff on the title to this post.

Chickenlittle: The skies' falling!!

bearbee said...

That congressional types understand banking, finance and basic economics.

Oops... does that fall into politics?

My view is non-partisan.

George said...

"The proper use of apostrophes"

hah!

yes!

Trumpit said...

Eric, you're extremely lucky to be here, alive, on Earth. You father produced millions of sperm and one of them helped make you. You're lucky your mother decided to have sex with your dad. You're so lucky. Someone who wins millions in the lottery is lucky. Some people are very unlucky. Can you think of any examples?

mrs whatsit said...

Oh. Duh. I did notice the title, and should have picked up the reference.

Bissage said...

That Reille Hunter’s orgasms were real.

1jpb said...

it never ceased to amaze me how many otherwise intelligent people believe in luck

I wonder if Palin believes in luck. I've known hard core religious folks who thought that references to luck were references to the power of Satan, aka LUCifer.

I still can't use the word "luck" because of my own exposure (and, being honest, buy in) to this concept. The thinking goes; God controls the world, so hoping for favor from some lucky force is blasphemy.

Bissage said...

That Heather Mills' orgasms were real.

Bissage said...

That Ashley Dupré’s orgasms were real.

Michael McNeil said...

AJ Lynch says:
That life expectancy can be increased significantly in the near future.

Ah, hah, hah! How ridiculous such a belief is. After all, any rational person knows such a thing is utterly impossible! (Not.) After all, whatever hasn't happened in the past before, can be relied upon never to occur in the future!

(Like, say, since nobody had ever done so, it's impossible for people to go to the Moon — another oh-so popular, respectable belief — up until the 1960s, that is, and now once again. Hm… I wonder what happened during the 60's?)

Yes, the whole idea of extended longevity is simply absurd. After all, as noted biologist Jacques Monod put it in his 1971 book Chance and Necessity: “There are occasional promises of remedies expected from the current advances in molecular genetics. This illusion, spread by a few superficial minds, had better be disposed of.” You believe him, right? He's a rational expert in biology!

Pace Jacques Monod, the third of a century since he wrote those disparaging words have revealed that he's utterly wrong (as indeed more farsighted people knew even then).

Unfortunately for J.M., physiologist and geneticist J.B.S. Haldane had the proper comeback for Monod's (much later) words at a time when ol' Jacques was only 14 years old; too bad he didn't take them to heart (from Haldane's Daedalus, or Science and the Future, 1924):

“We are at present almost completely ignorant of biology, a fact which often escapes the notice of biologists, and renders them too presumptuous in their estimates of the present position of their science, too modest in their claims for the future…. The conservative has but little to fear from the man whose reason is the servant of his passions, but let him beware of him in whom reason has become the greatest and most terrible of the passions. These are the wreckers of outworn empires and civilizations, doubters, disintegrators, deicides…. I do not say that biologists as a general rule try to imagine in any detail the future applications of their science. They do not see themselves as sinister or revolutionary figures. They have no time to dream. But I suspect that more of them dream than would care to confess it….”

Folks are aware, right, that just between 2005 and 2006 — a single year — the average lifespan in this country increased by four months (1/3 of a year) — nor is that out of line with typical years. Reminds me of the association in Larry Niven's science fictional “Known Space” universe (where folks were often centuries old) for which the minimum age for membership went up one year for every two that passed….

Then there's the human genome decipherment (the neanderthal genome is scheduled for completion in a couple of months — no joke; shades of Jurassic Park!), the “reading” and understanding of which is now ongoing; plus the discovery and taming now underway of stem cell technology, potentially allowing the regrowing of entirely new blood vessels, hearts, and any other organ of the body.

Thus, it's entirely probable that in the not too distant future, likely for people living today, the future once again will turn out to be very unlike the past.

John K. said...

Some educated people irrationally believe that the U.S. government derives its "just" powers from the consent of the governed. It's not so irrational to believe that the government gets away with the things it gets away with because "we" the people "consent" insofar as we don't collectively rise up to violently throw off our oppressors, like "we" did in the Revolution. But to think that our collective unwillingness to do so (thus far) somehow confers "justice," legitimacy or authority upon the powers the government in fact wields -- that's irrational.

Pogo said...

Some people believe Michael Moore makes documentaries.

Some believe Woody Allen films are artistic.

Some believe there is justice in this world.

Some believe that the basic nature of man is malleable and can be perfected given sufficient rules, regulation, and education.

Some people believe "Rent" is a good play.

Bissage said...

I am a reasonably intelligent, educated person and I believe in this, sort of.

Bissage said...

Everyone should believe in something.

I believe I'll have another drink.

Windbag said...

I know intelligent people who believe that they don't need spell check and grammar check on their computers.

AJ Lynch said...

That Bissage is not frigging hilarious.

That Bissage is a wonderful commenter.

AJ Lynch said...

That I undertand even 10% of what Michael McNeil just posted.

Seven Machos said...

John K. -- People vote. Sorry they don't vote for your schmucky, loser candidates. Sorry you weren't popular in high school.

Good luck with that revolution, though. 'Cause God knows, you're gonna need it.

Dody Jane said...

Faeries

Seven Machos said...

1jpb -- I've known black people who eat watermelon and listen to rap music. Do you find that stereotypical?

It's okay for you to stereotype religious people, though. Right?

Windbag said...

Violence never solved anything.

Freeman Hunt said...

Psychics, tarot cards, efficacy of various charms and talismans.

When I was an atheist, I was shocked at how many atheists believed in ghosts. I always wondered what they thought these ghosts were doing or where they came from if no supernatural realm existed.

Seven Machos said...

I'm always surprised that socialists believe in ghosts because, if you think about it, the haunting of a house implies the principle of fee simple ownership.

Freeman Hunt said...

That water freezes into either beautiful or ugly crystal patterns based on the content of nearby text.

No, I'm not kidding.

AJ Lynch said...

"Bokonism" Heh.

Wikipedia says one of its key tenets is "karass"ing a lovely ass? If so, I believe.

John K. said...

Seven Machos said: "People vote."

Yes, some people think it's perfectly okay to attempt to inflict their will on others by casting their pathetic vote into a cesspool with millions of other votes.

But the vast majority don't vote. If we really think we're a democracy, it's time we listened to that majoritarian decency.

As much as I think Ron Paul would be the lesser of all the evils out there, he's not "my" candidate, as you're probably assuming. I wouldn't vote for him.

bleeper said...

Trumpit believes "stomachache" is a word.

He also believes he is special and his mother tells him to share his precious opinions on the internet because she thinks he's special, too.

Maxine whatshername believes in astrology - read her post about Paul Newman. Yep, those stars out there in "constelations" control our behavior. Makes sense to me.

Some believe in Chinese superstitions such as Feng Shui. We have our own schemes for interior decorating, thank you very much, Chairman Mao.

Some folks believe in Chinese "medicine". Or accupunture.

Animal guides.

Guardian angels.

Or the most preposterous of all, intelligent liberals. They are like unicorns - beloved by little girls, but unseen by rational adults.

Freeman Hunt said...

Jungian dream interpretation as a path to spiritual progression and/or deep psychological insight.

Seven Machos said...

Irrational things that's intelligent, educated people believe in: that an expression of apathy such as not voting is something different than not caring.

People who don't care don't care. There is no evidence whatsoever that they support your pet causes.

Seven Machos said...

Here's another one: the thousands of really rich people who are really far to the left and vote Democratic who believe that they are special and different from the other rich people.

John K. said...

I.e., Politics is the extension of war by other means.

Freeman Hunt said...

That aliens or inter-dimensional beings helped man build the pyramids or other impressive structures.

Alien abductions, especially that book, Communion.

J said...

"I know law professors who believe in astrology"

Don't confuse educated with intelligent.

Seven Machos said...

The uncivilized and wholly unhealthy belief that politics is the extension of war by other means.

JAL said...

Freeman Hunt posts her sign:
Astrological Sign: Capricorn
Zodiac Year: Sheep


Ummm.....

Does that mean she believes in ....?

(Sorry. Like your stuff, just struck me as funny given this thread.)

Freeman Hunt said...

Freeman Hunt posts her sign:
Astrological Sign: Capricorn
Zodiac Year: Sheep


NO. She DOES NOT believe in it. Blogger does that automatically when you enter your birthday.

A bug not a feature, in my opinion.

Freeman Hunt said...

That certain points on the globe provide especially healthful electromagnetic fields or cosmic vibrations.

Seven Machos said...

As Eli Manning says, I am not superstitious. But I am kind of stitious. And he's a Super Bowl champion.

Just ask Trooper York.

Bissage said...

(1) Thanks, AJ!

(2) Professor? I hope you don’t mind that I’m going to link to a post I did on my own blog this morning.

I’m not trying to steal commenters like some commenters recently who I’ll not mention. I think that’s VERY RUDE.

(You know who you are so consider yourselves scolded!)

It’s just that it’s extraordinarily coincidental that I did that post and then you post this one.

And I believe that coincidence tells us that something’s trying to tell us something!

Ha!

(3) If I’m out of line, please delete this comment and I’ll never do it again.

(4) Honest Injun!

Michael McNeil said...

That I undertand even 10% of what Michael McNeil just posted.

What don't you understand (or, given the 10%, perhaps I should say what did you understand) about it?

John K. said...

The magical belief that 51% of a vote is enough to legitimize the use of force by that 51% in imposing their will upon the other 49%. Now, if you can come up with 90%, then you might have a better argument that the coercion is probably morally justified (i.e. 99.9% of the people no doubt believe that murder and armed robbery are wrong and should be punished), but these numbers are ultimately arbitrary. There's nothing magical about 51% (or 50.001%), but a lot of educated people seem to think there is.

JAL said...

Thanks Freeman. Knew it probably was something flukey like that.

Glad that's cleared up. ;-)

But that adds to the thread -- why do web designers assume participants would think that information worth including? (Fills up white space?)

Reminds me of Michael Shermer's Why People Believe Weird Things.

Palladian said...

"What are some irrational things that's intelligent, educated people believe in?"

That anarchy would be a workable political "system" in 2008.

Trumpit said...

Bleeper sounds like a dumbed down version of Palladian - his evil twin?

The belief that English is a purely logical language. We have "headache" yet we have "stomach ache". stop correectinng my grammer and speling you morron, bleeper. you should be edited out of from the bleeping universe.

Trumpit said...

toothache,backache,headache..

I say stomachache is a word just like the others. Go fudge yourself!

Seven Machos said...

John K's belief that belief that some 49 percent of the people in the United States are being oppressed by tyrants.

And the general belief that because perfect has not been attained, good is bad.

Trumpit said...

According to Meriam-Webster's Dictionary "stomachache" is one word. You are a bigger idiot than I orginally thought.

Michael The Magnificent said...

That if something is 100% natural, it is safe to eat.

Michael McNeil said...

Seven Machos sez:
John K's belief that belief that some 49 percent of the people in the United States are being oppressed by tyrants.

Myself, I don't say that the good is bad, but it does astonish me when folks assert that the tyranny of the majority isn't very real.

Perceptive observer of the early United States, Alexis de Tocqueville said it best, I think, in his masterwork Democracy in America (1835-40):

“My greatest complaint against democratic government as organized in the United States is not, as many Europeans make out, its weakness, but rather its irresistible strength. What I found most repulsive in America is not the extreme freedom reigning there but the shortage of guarantees against tyranny.

“When a man or a party suffers an injustice in the United States, to whom can he turn? To public opinion? That is what forms the majority. To the legislative body? It represents the majority and obeys it blindly. To the executive power? It is appointed by the majority and serves as its passive instrument. To the police? They are nothing but the majority under arms. A jury? The jury is the majority vested with the right to pronounce judgment; even the judges in certain states are elected by the majority. So, however iniquitous or unreasonable the measure which hurts you, you must submit.

“But suppose you were to have a legislative body so composed that it represented the majority without being necessarily the slave of its passions, an executive power having a strength of its own, and a judicial power independent of the other two authorities; then you would still have a democratic government, but there would be hardly any remaining risk of tyranny.”

Freeman Hunt said...

But that adds to the thread -- why do web designers assume participants would think that information worth including?

Good question. Especially without the option of removing it. I'm continually contemplating the removal of my birthday from my Blogger profile just to get that silly astrological stuff off of there.

Martin Gale said...

1.) Wind, solar, and other alternative energy sources can provide the bulk of our energy needs within a decade or two. (Corrupt corporate Amerikkka keeps us from making the effortless transition to limitless green energy.)

Related conspiracy theory . . .

2.) Some guy in Encino invented a car in the 50s that runs on (solar power, weasel urine, H2O, pine bark, . . .) and gets unlimited mileage. The only reason you haven't heard of him is that a death squad from the Big 3 auto companies killed him and seized all the blueprints. This happens periodically.

3.) Anything related to Roswell, NM.

Seven Machos said...

The belief that because it is tyrannical for the majority to oppress the minority, it is better for the minority to oppress the majority.

1jpb said...

It's okay for you to stereotype religious people, though. Right?

1) I said that I share the belief myself.

2) You should know that I attend an Assemblies of God church myself.

3) I asked a question wondering if Pallin agrees with me and the others I know with the same religious beliefs she follows.

You are offended by my comment?

A lot of you conservatives are such victimology babies regarding Palin. You're even making typically weak minded Dems seem self-assured and stable.

Eric said...

No tyranny of the majority? Try refusing to pay taxes.

blake said...

A lot of intelligent, educated people believe that they are particularly attuned to what is irrational, can spot it with laser-like precision in others, and are personally immune to it.

blake said...

Intelligent, educated people believe that all things in Heaven and Earth really have been dreamt of in their philosophy.

knox said...

...that soy products are better for you than dairy

knox said...

...that "lactose intolerance" "peanut allergies" and the like are rampant

1jpb said...

...believe that all things...

Now you're muddying the waters of your first comment. (Well, actually you're personally reinforcing it by displaying your own laser-like capacity to define the failings of others. Hopefully that was intentionally ironic.)

ricpic said...

That there is any point in drinking white wine when red wine is available.

1jpb said...

ricpic wins!

Even a mostly beer drinker knows that.

John K. said...

Palladian said: "That anarchy would be a workable political 'system' in 2008."

Ah, but I am more of a "philosophical anarchist," as one of my intellectual heroes, Albert Jay Nock, described himself. Interestingly, he also considered himself a Georgist (albeit one who was skeptical of trying to implement it politically), a radical (which etymologically simply means going to the origin or root), and . . . a conservative ("when it is not necessary to change, it is necessary not to change").

Like Nock, I'm not about throwing out the baby with the bathwater, or trying to change society overnight. I just think a more widespread reality-based recognition of the mythological illusions upon which governmental authority and legitimacy is based would be a step in the right direction.

Allan said...

Large numbers of prestigious academics used to believe
(and many still do)
that Karl Marx was a great philosopher.

During the 30's and 40's
many of the same types thought
that Uncle Joe was a good guy.

jdeeripper said...

Women's intuition

Cruel neutrality

Matt Damon looks like a leading man

No biogenetic differences exist among racial groups and sexes for intelligence and personality.

Bob Dylan can sing

Prayer effects the physical universe outside your own body

Jewish ethnocentrism does not dominate the "neo conservative" movement

Verbal skill is a necessary sign of intelligence

There's no free lunch

A person is innocent until proven guilty

Quantum physical interpretations apply at higher levels of organization

Circus peanuts are a legitimate candy.

People walk their dogs

Prostitution is a victimless crime

It's OK to name a professional sports team that plays all it's home games in a stadium in one state after another state

Michael_H said...

Chakras

Michael_H said...

The New York Giants are a good football team.

Michael_H said...

Ales are better than lagers.

Michael_H said...

Warm beer.

Michael_H said...

I understand probability. I nevertheless buy lottery tickets because I know that I am going to win.

Michael_H said...

Pie has no calories if you don't eat the crust.

Michael_H said...

Pizza is an Italian meal.

rosensmith said...

That Freudian psychotherapy works. Or Jungian psychotherapy.

Michael_H said...

Owning a Subaru makes one look authentically outdoorsy.

Michael_H said...

I am happier than most people I know.

Michael_H said...

Planing. Want to hear God laugh? Make a plan for your life.

Michael_H said...

iPods are not a gateway drug into the Apple cult.

Michael_H said...

I buy Playboy for the articles.

Michael_H said...

Quality time with one's children is better than quantity time.


(If quality time is indeed better,a try this little experiment: Tell your employer Monday morning that you are going to work only 15 hours weekly for the same pay you receive for working 40+ hours. But they'll be quality hours).

vbspurs said...

"I don't know, but asking me that question is a good sign that you're not worth talking to".

I'm a Leo. We are born-leaders -- in our minds. To others, we're just conceited assholes.

Cheers,
Victoria

vbspurs said...

"Living well is the best revenge".

The hell it is. Living in good health, surrounded by a happy family is the best revenge. Money can't buy any of that.

vbspurs said...

Freeman Hunt posts her sign:
Astrological Sign: Capricorn
Zodiac Year: Sheep


I like Capricorns. Cerebral people, even if they always have a cross to bear (it is the sign of Christ, after all).

Now Aquarians are scary crazy. They have inner demons which propel them to success that people will never know about.

We can only guess at them...OPRAH.

(Oh yeah, and Sarah Palin too. Gulp)

Andrew said...

Voters who think their candidate is the Messiah.

Candidates who think they can roll back the waters and heal the earth.

Legislators who think they can draft really, really good laws.

Law professors who think they're moderates.

Homeowners that didn't think their property values would go down.

Europeans who think that they're not "cultural imperialists."

Americans who care about what Europeans think of us.

Christians who believe that a Jewish carpenter died for thier sins 2,000 years ago and celebrate that weekly through a ritualized feast of flesh and blood.

"Reality-based" thinkers who "believe" scientific theories.

"Faith-based" thinkers who "theorize" intelligent design because they can't explain it otherwise.

Taxpayers that think paying teachers more money will improve education.

Meade said...

"Bob Dylan can sing"

He can but he chooses not to.

rhhardin said...

Defense of astrology from Vicki Hearne and Douglas Adams here

Vicki Hearne in google.books.com above here, p111-112.

rhhardin said...

Prayer effects the physical universe outside your own body

Peanuts key chain tag from the 70s:

CB: ``I've made an interesting theological discovery. If you hold your hands upside down when you pray, you get the opposite of what you pray for.''

Fen said...

rational people supplant religion with liberalism to fill the spiritual hole in their lives.

Cousin Bob said...

That letting 35% of Mexico into the State of Col-i-forn-ya would make things better for the working people already here.

I don't know if intelligent, educated people BELIEVE it, not being privy to the innermost thoughts of me betters in places like Santa Monica, but that's what they SAY.

Plus they can get José to clip their Bouganvilla real cheap.

bleeper said...

Isn't he cute? The little fellow piped up and called me a name. Hope his mommy makes his tummy ache all better now...

erniecu73 said...

vbspurs said...
"I don't know, but asking me that question is a good sign that you're not worth talking to".

I'm a Leo. We are born-leaders -- in our minds. To others, we're just conceited assholes.

Cheers,
Victoria


Do you know who else is a Leo? I'll give you a hint: August 13th, 1926

bleeper said...

Past life regression.

The string theory.

erniecu73 said...

bleeper, I believe in string theory! Well, the latest version: The Complete String/Membrane Theory of Universal Origin...sounds nifty? Try it out!

rhhardin said...

Stomachache is marginal because stomach is two syllables.

bleeper said...

Erns - yes, I will. How exactly do we test it?

Not saying I disbelieve it, just waiting for some tests to confirm it. I think we will have to wait a long time to have some way of proving or disproving it. But it's a swell theory.

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