June 5, 2007

"We take consolation in the fact that the team was on a mission to help another."

A very sad plane crash:
No one was believed to have survived the crash of a small plane that was carrying a six-member organ transplant team and their cargo of donor organs, authorities said Tuesday.
Searchers found human remains during a search in Lake Michigan, about six miles northeast of Milwaukee, a Coast Guard official said Tuesday.

The team's lifesaving mission — carrying unspecified organs from Milwaukee for transplant to a patient in Michigan — was cut short Monday when the Cessna Citation went down in 57-degree water shortly after the pilot signaled an emergency....

The university identified those aboard the plane as: Dr. Martinus "Martin" Spoor, a cardiac surgeon who had been on the faculty since 2003; Dr. David Ashburn, a physician-in-training in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery; Richard Chenault II, a transplant donation specialist with the university transplant program; Richard Lapensee, a transplant donation specialist with the university transplant program; and pilots Dennis Hoyes and Bill Serra.

9 comments:

Mike said...

Very sad.

paul a'barge said...

No women.

I blame the feminists.

The Drill SGT said...

Paul,

/sarcasism on here :)

female nurses are a dime a dozen. I assume the two pros from Dover flew in to harvest the organs at some local hospital and used the local hire nurses. It takes a man, apparently 2 men to carry the ice chests however. And doctors are above that.

/sarc off :)

I hope that whatever it was that caused the crash would not have been effected if the plane had been 200 pounds lighter.

Jennifer said...

Oh, how sad. I had a friend in high school who was lifeflighted out of NICU as an infant and the helicopter crashed. Everybody was ok, and he made it to the bigger hospital. This is terribly sad.

lee david said...

The quote that is the headline of this post is one of the most vacuous and stupid utterances that I have encountered in some time. If there is any concerne for the life saving mission that was being undertaken, their grief and sorrow should be doubled with the loss of life and the loss of the mission. And, it should be trebbled if the critically conditioned patient on the other end dies because of the loss of this mission. What pap.

Ruth Anne Adams said...

Another corollary to Althouse's 'died-doing-what-they-loved' principle?

Bissage said...

[L]ee david, shouldn't you be singing with Van Halen or something?

lee david said...

Sorry Bissage, I'm missing the connection unless it's the commonality of Lee and David in Roth's name but in reverse order.

Methadras said...

You will never catch me on a small puddle jumper like that. Give me a gigantic commercial airliner any day of the week. Otherwise, I'll take my chances and drive instead of fly in those little matchboxes with wings.