June 7, 2007

"Feminist Blogosphere Politics."

That's the topic for a live chat by Ryan Grim, who stirred things up in that Politico profile of me. You can submit questions here now. He'll respond tomorrow at noon.

UPDATE: Read the chat here.

29 comments:

AJD said...

Again about the little profile?! For the love of God, give it a rest.

But you do need to keep busy ignoring the fact that Bush's own choice fo "war czar" just said that a withdrawal from Iraq "ought to be considered."

The only remaining question is whether A-House will be the last thinking person in the U.S. supporting this failed war.

vrse said...

I get it, Politico profiled you. Congratulations, a struggling quasi-propagandist enterprise paid some attention to you.

Super-Electro-Magnetic Midget Launcher said...

Bush's own choice fo [sic] "war czar"

The fact that the guy is "Bush's own choice" somehow makes it meaningful? You really believe that? Just how abysmally stupid do you have to be before the left will take you in?

The truth of a statement isn't much affected by who said it, nor by who appointed him. Appealing to authority is a fallacy. I'm sure you think it's a good idea anyhow because all the people you most respect do it all the time, but that, you see, once again...

Oh, never mind.

Simon said...

Tully linked earlier to this from Joe Klein, which seems apt:

"[S]ome great reporting takes place in the blogosphere ... [but] the smart stuff is being drowned out by a fierce, bullying, often witless tone of intolerance that has overtaken the left-wing sector of the blogosphere. Anyone who doesn't move in lockstep with the most extreme voices is savaged and ridiculed — especially people ... who often agree with the liberal position but sometimes disagree and are therefore considered traitorously unreliable."

I feel compelled to add that it's not the "feminist" blogosphere, per se, that's the problem: it's the leftosphere generally. I reject the desire by liberal feminists to assert sole ownership over feminism, and I reject the premise that the disease reflected in conditions like ADS and the reactions to Ryan's comments is anything to do with feminism rather than liberalism.

AlphaLiberal said...

Did you see that on the same day Ann was profiled in Politico, Jessica Valenti was on the Colbert Report?

That was funny. Valenti won that round! (esp with her substantive analysis). Though I forgot to check out her breasts.

Ann Althouse said...

Some of you commenters seem to think I control Politico. I don't. I'm just linking because it relates to me. The "dustup" question wasn't my idea, but when it was asked, I didn't think of lying. The only reason that was the biggest dustup is because so many people attacked me. They could have ignored me. They decided to make a whole blog swarm out of it.

It's not like I wanted that or enjoyed it or went looking for ways to bring it up again. I didn't. They could have ignored Politico too, but they made a big deal about it, surprising Ryan, and he seemed to feel he should respond. Hence the chat.

I am not looking for a fight. But I will stand my ground. And I know a push back when I see it. I will not be pushed back. (Certainly not by the lame comments here!) I stand by my original observation about the photograph, the use of sexual imagery on the Feministing blog, and my position that feminists should not be cozying up to Bill Clinton.

Fen said...

I love how the Left has little brownshirts trolling the net checking in on Dems like Ann, making sure she toes the party line.

Even worse, that our own Lefty commenters don't have the balls to call them on it.

Its like the cliff notes to Animal Farm

vrse said...

My problem is that you call yourself a moderate femenist, when you're neither.

You have subscribed, either explicit or implicitly, to the most authoritarian and extremist policies of this administration, all "because of 9/11." You are, an "extremist," in this regard. There's no way around that. The fact that you don't hate gays and call yourself a feminist does not temper this extremism and make you moderate. So stop calling yourself a moderate.

Once you do this and stop saying stupid things like Padilla was blinded to keep him from blinking code to terrorists, or that Valenti somehow was using her breasts to attract Clinton's attention, then I'll stop wasting my time commenting on your blog.

A concern UW Law student.

Simon said...

vrse said...
"[Ann] ha[s] subscribed, either explicit or implicitly, to the most authoritarian and extremist policies of this administration, all 'because of 9/11.'"

Assessing that claim requires you to share something: What do you regard as the most "extremist" and "authoritarian" policies of the administration?

Fen said...
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Todd said...
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Todd said...

This stuff still astonishes me First, all the commenters at Politico that jumped to defend Valenti, again. Did she even need defending in the first place?
I guess. It was only nine months ago, after all.
I just thought it was pretty funny, at the time. [I may have been in the minority.] How many of us have been in that situation with a photographer going 'ok you, turn left a little, you step in closer, now lean...' I'm sure that's what was really going on. Hey, maybe the photog was a Rove plant, eh? And you played right into his hands, Ann. Way to go.

Second, 'left,' 'right,' 'center,' 'moderate,' 'liberal' etc. These terms are all subjective. Especially these days. Still, people like "vrse" insist on telling Ann (and, no doubt, everybody else too) what to call herself. And this: "Once you [stop calling yourself moderate]... then I'll stop wasting my time commenting on your blog." That's just precious.

Oh, and in between my reading this post and leaving a comment, there was TC. colleague of yours?

Bissage said...

"[T]hen I'll stop wasting my time commenting on your blog."

That is laugh out loud funny. I hope he picked up all the value under the curve by typing with one hand while masturbating with the other.

"A concern [sic] UW Law student."

BONUS POINTS, YET!!!

Althouse, you really do attract the best commenters.

Eli Blake said...

Actually, there is a question I'd like to ask Ann (and I'm being the kinder, gentler version of vrse-- I do see a lot of reasoned thought by Ann, but I have trouble with this one):

In continuing to support the Iraq war, you are in effect supporting the opposite of feminism. Women in Iraq today are governed by a constitution that says right up front that 'sharia shall be a source of law,' and it has been already in terms of restricting the rights of women in matters like divorce, inheritance and custody so that they no longer have equal legal rights with men (which they did actually have under the brutal, but secular regime of Saddam.) We even saw recently the horrific stoning to death of a teenage girl in what is supposed to be the most 'peaceful' and 'advanced' region of Iraq (Kurdistan) as the Iraqi police just stood by and watched.

A 'success' would presumably be a stable Iraq under the same fundamentalist dominated government that is there now, and which has already legally restricted the rights of women.

So how (other than the really defeatist argument that the fundamentalists on the other side would be no better-- which I concede readily) do you square support of the Bush Iraq policy with feminism?

Ann Althouse said...

Fen said..."I love how the Left has little brownshirts trolling the net checking in on Dems like Ann, making sure she toes the party line. Even worse, that our own Lefty commenters don't have the balls to call them on it."

Aptly put. I hope you drop in on that Politico chat tomorrow. You're absolutely right here. You'd think at some point it would sink in that the disciplining doesn't work on me.

Eli Blake said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Ann Althouse said...

Eli: He didn't say all lefties. And I don't delete everything I think is bad. It takes time to delete things, but in any case, I want debate. Some of the hostile stuff isn't particularly good debate, but it kind of makes its own argument against itself.

Eli Blake said...

And I realized that what I said was overly focused on comments on your own blog, vs. comments out in the blogsphere in general.

Eli Blake said...

So I hit the trashcan icon, just at the wrong moment.

I did however submit the question about Iraq and feminism, because that one has always been in my mind one of the great contradictions-- how any feminist could support the kind of government we see over there now.

vrse said...

Bissage said: "That is laugh out loud funny. I hope HE picked up all the value under the curve by typing with one hand while masturbating with the other."

What makes you think I'm a dude? You dumb douchebag?

peter hoh said...

Hey, I'll go on record as having assumed that vrse was female.

Male and female are pretty clear labels. It's conservative, liberal, feminist, and similar labels that have become meaningless.

Bissage said...

The same thing that makes me think you're a "concern [sic] UW Law student."

Roger said...

Eli--You pose a question that is interesting, and I don't think I have seen it asked before. Certainly the good prof can answer for herself, but a couple of thoughts: You are assuming that Iraq will end up resembling one of the more fundamentalist Arab states, which I agree are antithetical to feminism. Certainly that's possible, but Iraq does have a history of secularism and that might very well trump fundamentalism. Neither of us know. The well publicized stoning in Kurdistan was certainly not a routine feature as in, say, Afghanistan under the Taliban, and was confined to a rather obscure fundamentalist sect.

As to what I see as the larger point, do you believe that "feminism," however defined, is even possible under what you describe as a brutal, secular rregime? I don't think it is, personally, but even if it is, it may be a situation wherein you have to select the lesser of two evils.

At any rate, thanks for a good question that got me thinking.

Ann Althouse said...

Thanks, Roger. First, I never advocated for the war. I wasn't blogging when it started, and I have never taken a position about whether it was right. Do people realize that? I didn't vote for Bush in 2000. I have always only been writing about what to do now that it has been started. I hate the idea of Iraq becoming a fundamentalist country in which women are oppressed. I see that as one more reason not to abandon our responsibilities. I'd like to know how feminists who want us to declare defeat and leave deal with this problem.

Fen said...

You'd think at some point it would sink in that the disciplining doesn't work on me.

Well, while I'm sorry it happens to you, I'm glad they show their true colors. They are a constant reminder to me of why I'm no longer on the Left, why they will always be my enemy: they are the same people who give a wink & a nod to fascist totalitarian states. The same people who are all of sudden concerned about the fate of Iraqi women.

[its not a bad question Eli, I just wish you would apply it to the rest of the women in the ME, and not when it conveniently supports your anti-war position.]

Fen said...
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Fen said...
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Eli Blake said...

Fen:

I have.

For example, in my post on the stoning http://tiodt.blogspot.com/2007/05/girl-stoned-to-death-for-falling-in.html I wrote,

It is tempting to blame the U.S. presence in Iraq, but that would be wrong. This may have happened in Iraq, but the U.S. occupation has nothing to do with it (though the failure of local authorities to do anything about it is typical of what we've seen from Iraqi police and government officials.) For one thing, this sort of thing happens all the time, all over the middle east. Women or girls who even look at a man the wrong way can face the most severe punishment, including not only death by stoning but also by stabbing, beating with clubs, fists or rifle butts, burning to death, being boiled alive and pretty much any other unspeakably brutal way you can think of that a man or a group of men could kill a woman. As religious fundamentalism has spread in Iraq (not just Islamic-- these people were members of a cult opposed to Islam), so have age old, and truly monstrous traditions for 'dealing' with anything other than a 100% subservient, docile, cowering and obedient woman.

There is also this post in which I discussed people who were then making accusations similar to what you are saying here:

And I don't feel any differently about it today. And it isn't even logical that anyone on the left could feel any sympathy for a guy like Zarqawi even if he wasn't a murderer-- if he or those who think like him ever did succeed, they would create a feudal society where men are absolutely in control and girls have to drop out of school before junior high school so they can get married, where people are forced to pray several times per day and even the smallest moral transgression is punishable by such things as public flogging, amputation, or being stoned to death. Why would any of us Liberals feel sympathy for a guy who wants to create that kind of a society?

You may want to read what I've posted across the blogsphere before jumping to conclusions.

Fen said...

You may want to read what I've posted across the blogsphere before jumping to conclusions.

uh no. Thats a bit of a stretch. You expect me to google everything you've written on the net?

But thanks for quoting the two articles. I see that you *have* defended Iraqi women in the past, and that you're weren't just using them in bad faith. Nicely done.

Fen: I just wish you would apply it to the rest of the women in the ME, and not when it conveniently supports your anti-war position

Just an idea...