October 30, 2006

Making fun of Bush for saying "the Google"...

... while using the term "internet blogs." Time for NPR to catch some mockery from this weblogger on the internet web.

31 comments:

George said...

NPR gets away with murder.

Here are some of the wacky bits I heard on NPR last week...

Something called "The Unger Report" in which a comedian did a lame routine saying that Bush would replace Rumsfeld with an openly gay Sec. of Defense who would institute a "Do Tell" policy. It was about as bad as Limbaugh's recorded yuks.

One evening an ultra-snarky woman delivered a commentary based on Paul Fussell's book "Class" which tries to define Americans cultural status. She said, "....And today we have a President who went to Yale and says Jesus is his personal friend!" Heavens to Betsy! The commentator? An editor at The Atlantic.

A report on the 60 Minutes interview about the Duke lacrosse case failed to mention that the second stripped essentially denied the allegations.

During an early morning show the host interviewed a legal expert about the New London (?) property rights case. Apropos of something, he worrisomely asked not once but twice, "Is this part of the anti-regulation conspiracy?"

What conspiracy?

Then there's Ann Garrels (sp?), the non-Arabic speaking, Baghdad-hotel living reporter who has been known to deliver her reportage in the nude....just like Ed Murrow on London rooftops during the blitz.

Jake said...

And to think that the government takes money away from us to put those idiots on the air.

Pogo said...

Ha ha ha!
Some people don't know the right internet slang!
Way funny! ROTFLMAO (and he doesn't get that either!!)

It's like he doesn't even know how a checkout scanner works. Man, count on NPR to be down with the 411 for all things cultural.

Rick Lee said...

What's wrong with saying "Internet blogs"?

Pogo said...

Rick, as it is short for weblogs, where else can one read blogs?
The weekly shopper?

Jim said...

It's embarrassing to realize that the last time a US president spoke a single foreign language fluently was 100 years ago.

How about instituting a policy that denies a university degree to anyone not fluent in a foreign language?

Fenrisulven said...

Paper Newspapers.

JorgXMcKie said...

How about we deny degrees to anyone who can't solve a simple quadratic equation and write a logical statement?

That'd get rid of a whole bunch of useless degrees.

Doug said...

Only slightly off the topic, but I have always wondered why some diseases are preceded by "the" and some aren't. Some examples: "the flu", "the clap" and sometimes people use "the crabs". While you have "a cold" or just plain "cancer".

MadisonMan said...

Typically, only one strain of virulent flu is active at a time. The one strain you have is the flu. There's no need to be vague about it. A cold, however, can have multiple pathogenic sources. So the cold is too precise. Which one?

That's always been my understanding, at least -- I could be wrong .

Jim said...

The flu is like The Ukraine and The South of France.

johnstodderinexile said...

When Bush found a good joke on an internet blog, he told Laura it made him "LOL out loud!"

I kind of like The Google. Sort of like The Hague. Or The Dalles. It must seem like The Google to Yahoo! sometimes.

Al Maviva said...

Jim, where did you learn that? Was it at The Ohio State University?

As for Bush, NPR can make fun, but that's only because they are too NooB to understand L33t. Bush was only talking about teh 9oo9l3 because it is teh suck, and that's how teh l33t s@y 1t. Phear Bu54! NPR is Fuxxxx0red!

Chevyiii said...

Or The Donald.

Jack said...
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Jack said...
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Jack said...

What does the Manolo say about all this? And wouldn't Charlotte's web be an example of a non-internet web log? I mean, technically, it had daily postings and it was on a web... just not The Web.

(Sorry, for the triple post. Typos...)

David Killoren said...

I don't really see how "internet blog" is inappropriate. Yeah, blogs only appear on the internet, but not everyone who listens to NPR knows that. So you've got to have "internet" in there. And you can't do without "blog" in the phrase, because that's the name for the thing they're talking about.

Would you object if they used the phrase "blogs on the internet"? If not, I don't see how "internet blog" is any worse.

On the other hand, "the Google" is just silly. Adding "the" doesn't clarify anything or provide more information. The "the" just indicates lack of familiarity with the internet/

Gahrie said...

I'm shocked, Shocked I tell you, that someone over the age of 50 is unfamiliar or uncomfortable with the internet!

Why, it is almost like the world wide web has only been around for ten years or so!

I bet Pres. Bush knows a lot more about TV tubes than most people under the age of 40.

Charles Giacometti said...

Gahrie makes a great point, which is the age of the speaker can be a determinant in their comfort with emerging technology. (And this is not to say the sole determinant, as some of the brightest Internet people I know are in their 50s and 60s).

I heard a talk in the recent past that described digital strangers (roughly, people over 50), digital immigrants (roughly, people between 20 and 50), and digital natives (people under 20). While these are generalizations, they struck me as useful ones.

Al Maviva said...

I bet Pres. Bush knows a lot more about TV tubes than most people under the age of 40.

I'll keep that in mind when the country is facing the challenge of bringing its old 50's vintage Emersons, RCA's and Montaignes out of mothballs to deploy nationwide in an effort to fend off a brutal invasion of Cold War-era Soviet cartoons on channels 14-999.

Abraham said...

The "the" just indicates lack of familiarity with the internet.

On the other hand, "the Internet" is just silly. Adding "the" doesn't clarify anything or provide more information.

Jeremy said...

A lot of college freshmen here in California just spent the last two months discovering that NorCal students say that they "drove 101 to 405" while SoCal students "drove the 101 to the 405." Didn't we all get our jollies off of this one a while ago?

charles- Are "Internet people" virtual friends from Second Life or is that just a funny turn of phrase used to describe people that use the internet?

JimK said...

I'll keep that in mind when the country is facing the challenge of bringing its old 50's vintage Emersons, RCA's and Montaignes out of mothballs to deploy nationwide in an effort to fend off a brutal invasion of Cold War-era Soviet cartoons on channels 14-999.

As opposed to our current desperate situation, where the nation is facing the eminent threat of...

uhh...

...searching for nude pics of Marcia Cross on the interwebs?

Seriously, I got nuthin'. All I know is, this is just another stupid thing people will waste time with, when we could be criticizing Bush for actualy things he's done wrong.

Charles Giacometti said...

Jeremy asked, charles- Are "Internet people" virtual friends from Second Life or is that just a funny turn of phrase used to describe people that use the internet?

Good question. I work in publishing, and we work a lot with companies like Google and Yahoo, so I tend to think of people who work for these companies as "Internet people," that is, they make their living on the Internet.

No second life here. First life keeps me busy enough...

JimK said...

criticizing Bush for actualy

OMG, I is teh st00pidz.

knoxgirl said...

NPR. A bigger bunch of pinheads there never were. Except at PBS.

Daryl Herbert said...

NPR airheads use the term "popular democracies" (i.e., left-wing elected governments) to suggest that left-wing governments are inherently more legitimate than moderate or right-wing governments. That's but one example of just how far to the left NPR is. Forget them.

David Killoren said...

Abraham --

On the off chance you're being serious: The difference between saying "the Google" and saying "the internet" is that people who are familiar with computers and the internet use the latter phrase but not the former one. So, if you happen to non-jokingly use "the Google" in a sentence, you reveal that either (a) you don't talk very often to people who are familiar with computers and the internet or (b) you're especially bad at learning how to appropriately use new words from context.

Abraham said...

David - my post was a humorous attempt to argue that there is any logical or practical grammatical reason for the using or not a "the." It's arbitrary, and the only reason for preferring one over another is popular usage.

Freeman Hunt said...

I once carpooled with a very liberal woman to take some kids to a weekend camp. She started a political conversation with me, and it seemed to be going well until she suddenly started yelling and then crying.

After that, things were a little awkward. On the way back from the camp, we didn't talk much, so she turned on NPR to listen to Garrison Keillor. She turned up the volume when he started telling jokes about Bush. After each one she would conspicuously guffaw.

I had a good time though. The rides in the car, both to and from the camp, were so awkward that they were humorous enough to enjoy.