September 15, 2006

Don't eat your spinach.

19 comments:

Meade said...

"Triple-rinsed Ready-to-Eat"

More or less.

David said...

E Coli, the gift that keeps on giving!

I wonder if it was organic?

The Drill SGT said...

David said...
I wonder if it was organic?


Almost certainly :(

E Coli transmission typically is do to one of:
1. fecal contamination of groud water
2. animal droppings in the fields
3. poor hand sanitation by field/packing crews

John said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
John said...

Children everywhere rejoice! See mom, I told you that stuff wasn't good for you!!!

Now, how about those brussel sprouts?

RogerA said...

This is very interesting--I work in Public Health, and when I heard the news on NPR this AM driving in, I went to the state Website--no alert from the state DOH--Nothing from CDC--looks like the FDA put this notice out. Anything involving agricultural products involves USDA and that is not a good thing from a public safety standpoint (IMO). Sometime I should relate the mad cow disease story, since the cow in question was slaughtered and buthered in the city where I work.

Jake said...

That is one of the dangers of eating organic foods that use natural fertilizer. The other real danger is toxic fungus that clings to untreated produce.

The British government found that 80% of organic produce had toxic fungus and recommended that no pregnant women eat organic.

RogerA said...

oops--I guess I maxed out the ratio of acronyms to words in one post. My apologies

JohnF said...

The article did say that cooking the spinach would kill the bugs, if any are there.

The Drill SGT said...

JohnF said...
The article did say that cooking the spinach would kill the bugs, if any are there.


true, but I'd bet the large bulk of fresh spinach in pre-washed, salad bags is intended for raw spinach salad. I know that's the only way we use it.

Meade said...

Yeah but "pre-washed" doesn't mean you don't give it one more good rinsing before using it, right Sgt?

Pastor_Jeff said...

Meade,

The article states: "Washing the spinach won't solve the problem, because the E. coli bacteria is too tightly attached, another FDA official warned on Friday."

-- which is a major bummer since I hate the smell of cooked spinach and love spinach salad.

Too Many Jims said...

Dang them e coli are cute.

noah said...

No.

Eat your spinach, like me and Popeye, from a can!

Or, steam or boil fresh spinach.

Or, be a utilitarian a la war on terrorism critics, do nothing and take your chances!!

Due to unfortunate similar deaths years ago, it is no longer possible to legally purchase a hamburger other than well-done in NC. Only because the owner knows I am a stand up guy am I able to get a medium cheeseburger at the local pub.

reader_iam said...

Nix on the canned spinach--the only way I can't eat the stuff.

I live with two vegetarians here, and raw greens of all types are a staple. I didn't like the equivocal statement the doc made about other bagged greens, did you?

So we're going to nix the spinach, and any other bagged product, for now, and go back to the old-fashioned way. Not worth the risk for convenience.

MadisonMan said...

Well, my suggestion would be to eat foods in season. Late summer is not spinach season. Spring and late Fall are spinach season. The greens to be eaten now are mustard, collard, beet, . . .

J. Peden said...

If you cook the shit out of it, you can eat it safely.

Kyle said...

Damn, this is going to put a serious damper in my spinach and Battlestar Gallactica party.

Dave said...

So I don't understand the spinach/Battlestar Galactica angle, but I would bet that most people who consumed the spinach would pull through it all right.

E. coli is nasty stuff but man, on average, has to have a sturdy immune system. Otherwise we would long ago have fallen to the vicissitudes of evolution.