August 25, 2006

Midwestern weather nightmare never ends.

You may have noticed that the new BloggingHeads episode is called "Tornado Watch Edition." You can see me reacting to the insane Wisconsin weather. For a journalistic view of the weather we've been experiencing out here in the upper middle United States, read this.

That was yesterday. Today, I keep wanting to leave the house, and it will be looking like a nice day, then, 5 minutes later, it's all dark and vicious and the idea of leaving the house is lunacy. Then, it's a nice day again, and I start collecting myself to venture forth, and it goes all bad again.

9 comments:

knoxgirl said...

Sounds like Knoxville. You always have to worry about it being sunny, then suddenly thunderstorming in the summer.

kimsch said...

Same weather here in the northeast corner of Illinois Ann. At 12:30 leaving to put the kindergartener on the bus it was nice and sunny. At 12:45 when I was just getting home it was becoming a "dark and stormy night". There's absolutely no way to know if I'll need the umbrella when I go to pick him up from the bus at 4:00.

snarkalicious said...

Here in Monona - I had lightning hit a tree less than 50 feet away when I was outside.....YIKES

Elizabeth said...

There's a tropical storm forming that should enter the Gulf by Sunday. Gee, I hope it doesn't disrupt the myriad Katrina ceremonies on Tuesday.

I used to live in Kansas and on one occasion had to pull to the side of the road and jump in a ditch as a tornado passed overhead.

I've spent three days snowbound in a northern California cabin with nothing but cabbage and beer (I was preparing to go to a St. Pat's party when the blizzard struck). That was no fun, except for the beer.

I've never been struck by lightning but I hope to live a good many years yet, so let's not rule it out.

Bruce Hayden said...

Here in the summer in CO, esp. in the mountains, you expect it to be clear in the mornings, cloud up and rain in the afternoons, and then clear up for evenings. Works that way a lot.

The one thing nice is that there pretty much aren't any tornados west of I-25. So, if you live or work east of there, you are at risk, esp. this time of year. But on the west end of town, and into the mountains, just doesn't happen. Nice.

But I am reminded of when I was in a firm south of downtown Denver a decade or so ago. We were on the 11th floor, with floor to ceiling windows. It went on the news that a tornado was coming through, turns out about a mile south of us. So, all the (male) attorneys in the office, ranging from 25 to 65, lined up by the windows on the south side of the building to watch it go through. The women were all safely in the basement where we all belonged. The tornado wouldn't have had to diverge from its path that far to wipe out the entire firm. But it was spectacular.

AllenS said...

That's why it's called whether, or weather.

Madison Guy said...

We've had the humid part of the Dog Days here in the Midwest, but it' s been more wind and rain than heat lately. In other words, one long set of soggy doggie days.

But now we have even more to worry about: Mother Nature's neurons misfiring and short-circuiting with "dangerous ground-to-ground lightning", according to the weather guy on the radio. What's up with that? This intrepid citizen journalist, scientific dilettante, and dedicated netizen set out to find out what's going on.

Kent said...

It's Gallup, not Gallop, New Mexico. The twits.

I'm surprised there wasn't the obligatory paragraph blaming it all on global warming.

Kev said...

I'd take "dark and vicious" a few times over our Texas drought at the moment...