May 25, 2006

Murder defendant tries to strangle his lawyer...

... in court, in front of the judge.

Cue the lawyer jokes. In a shameless bid for leniency....

12 comments:

PatCA said...

Sounds like the attorney had a Fisk-like response, as when Fisk got beaten up in Saudia Arabia and then opined later how he understood how they felt.

Mark Daniels said...

"I think he just didn't like the way some of the rulings the judge was making was going yesterday morning," said the attorney who was choked.

Oh, I get it, the assault was the judge's fault.

In a single statement, the attorney exonerated the defendant and maybe, himself.

Mark Daniels

MadisonMan said...

In a single statement, the attorney exonerated the defendant and maybe, himself.

Isn't that what a good lawyer does?

Richard Fagin said...

Do you suppose the judge will now grant the attorney's motion to withdraw on motion to reconsider?

Simon said...

One detail the story omits: was this appointed counsel, or the defendant's own choice?

Bob Mitze said...

Well I will respond to our host's request to cue the lawyer jokes...

What did the lawyer say when he stepped in a cow pie?

EEEK, I'm melting!

Elizabeth said...

I guess he hasn't liked the way other things have gone in his life; it would be pretty hard to presume this guy's innocence at this point.

Pogo said...

A question about law:
Can a defendant ask for a mistrial because he prejudiced his own case himself?

I remember long ago reading Bugliosi's Helter Skelter, and V.B. opining that their disruptions seemed to be so directed.

Maxine Weiss said...

Many criminal law attorneys apply for permits to carry concealed weapons.

Peace, Maxine

Bruce Hayden said...

I sure would (legally) carry a concealed weapon if I were a criminal attorney, prosecution or defense. Many of these defendants are going away for a good chunk of their lives to prison, and, not surprisingly, often feel like their attorneys didn't do enough for them.

Remember first that a lot of defendants can't afford really good attorneys, and, thus, end up with public defenders, who are overworked and underpayed. Also, all the lawyers get to go home after the trial, while the defendants often go off to prison.

So, yes, I am not surprised that there is animosity here - just surprised that it doesn't boil over more often.

bearbee said...

One detail the story omits: was this appointed counsel, or the defendant's own choice?

I read another article that indicated the attorney was court appointed. The attorney is 59 years old.

So will there automatically be new charges for attempted murder or must charges be made by the chokee? If there is a trial and if the attorney is required to testify I assume any prior client-attorney communication must remain privileged?

Mike Lief said...

Remember first that a lot of defendants can't afford really good attorneys, and, thus, end up with public defenders, who are overworked and underpayed.

It's funny how people assume that public defenders are bargain-basement consolation prizes for defendants who can't afford "real" attorneys.

Some of the best attorneys I know are public defenders, and some of the least impressive criminal defense attorneys I've gone up against are in private practice -- and charge big bucks.

The only problem with getting a public defender is that there's normally no way for the defendant to pick which public defender is assigned to your case. They're not all great, but as a rule, they're quite good.

That's the big advantage of hiring your own private attorney: you get to choose your advocate. The bigger problem is getting good advice on which attorney to hire.

When a relative (by marriage) got in trouble wid da man, I told him that if he had $10-15K for a preliminary hearing, I knew a few members of the private bar I'd recommend; otherwise he'd be just fine with a PD.

He ended up getting a very good disposition, without spending thousands for the same deal -- or something substantially worse -- negotiated by his "hack" public defender.