November 13, 2005

Why aren't you reading that essay?

I was going to read this essay -- about "chick flicks" -- but it started with the most annoyingly boring way to start an essay: by quoting a damned dictionary definition.

10 comments:

Meade said...

So I take it you didn't read the essay. That's a shame, as the writer makes some pretty good points about popular culture, feminism, and the marginalization of a class of people, in this case - women.

I like this line at the end: "As someone who was a kid throughout the women's movement, I thought feminism had largely to do with whether your mother was anti-Barbie or Barbie-neutral."

Ron said...

Ann, I feel you were right to pass; pretty cliched writing.

Ann Althouse said...

Commenters are free to summarize the argument. I did skim it, saw nothing interesting, including the Barbie line, went back to the top, started to read, and said, no, this is not a good use of my time. Kind of a "Blink" thing.

37921 said...

I don't think she has much of an argument. She just doesn't like the term "chick flick". And if we don't stop using it, she's going to take her dolls and go home!

Sally said...

The author is probably related to "somebody". How else to explain the publishing of such poor writing?

knoxgirl said...

OMG, the "dictionary definition"... I work in advertising, and let me tell you, once you start looking for it, you realize it is EVERYWHERE.

MD said...

Someone who writes an article complaining about the use of 'chick-lit' and 'chick-movie' shouldn't end the essay with a quintessentially 'chick-lit' line like, "feels like gravel in my shoe." I automatically imagine Manolos, of course.

amyalkon said...

I normally don't like use of dictionary definitions, but I thought this use made sense. Carina is smart. I know her in passing (because she's another girl writer living in LA), but we're not friends. It's easy to knock somebody's writing -- and there's plenty of writing to knock in the LA Times features sections -- but I don't include Carina Chocano's in that group. The ending -- the gravel thing -- fell flat, but I thought the rest was well-written and interesting thinking. Oh...wait...am I not being "cool" because I like the piece? Sorry!

-Amy Alkon, advicegoddess.com

wildaboutharrie said...

I agree, Amy. The dictionary reference was indicating that the phrase has "made it", but for all that, it's pretty meaningless.

I liked the Barbie reference, too.

Since I don't care much about movies, I would probably have passed, but I was curious to read the unimpressive writing! Probably not a good use of my time, after all. Nor is posting this. OK off to bed.

Harkonnendog said...

Horrible essay. Rather than looking at chick flicks to figure out what they have in common the author dismisses the idea that chick flicks have underlying similarities and says society sucks.

Crap!

Chick flicks ARE chick flicks. The term exists for a number of reasons, which a paid essayist should be able to figure out. If you want to argue that they don't all suck that's an entirely different argument.