October 14, 2016

"I speak three languages. English, German, and spastic."

 "Spastic is my mother tongue."

15 comments:

Chuck said...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6isXNVdguI8

chickelit said...

I did find the announcer of Bob Dylan's prize kind of hot -- the way she flawlessly moved through Swedish, English, French, and German -- definitely my cup of tea.

Expat(ish) said...

What is not covered in that article is that the Kokoda Trail is a part of Australia's cherished history, like ANZAC day.

The Australians fought the (until then) undefeated Japanese army backwards up a 60mi trail, suffering (and inflicting) amazing casualties. The very few Japanese survivors spread the word: don't go in the jungle against the Australians.

See also the amazing "Fuzzy Wuzzies" from PNG if you want a heartwarming story mixed in.

-XC

Eric the Fruit Bat said...

Good for him.

Now, my advice would be: When you write up your book on walking the Kokoda Trail, leave out the companion who succumbs to his alcohol addiction near the end thus providing some convenient and well-timed drama.

You've got a great story and there's no need to make up imaginary people and have them do imaginary things.

coupe said...

We have this old lady at church who uses a wheelchair due to her leg amputation, and she refuses to park in the handicap zone.

She said those people thrive on special treatment. It is her way of denying her predicament. She also resists people pushing her, but she can't resist when the kids push her. She is the special granny to them all.

Me, hell, I'd take the easy way out. Life is too short.

Cacimbo Cacimbo said...

Remarkable. Wonder what kind of shape he would be in with the benefit of this type of training his entire life rather than just starting in his late twenties.

buwaya said...

"leave out the companion who succumbs to his alcohol addiction near the end "

Since this is going to be largely about Australians, leaving out the alcohol addiction is missing the necessary touch of verisimilitude. This is going to affect the readers ability to suspend disbelief.

Ann Althouse said...

I highly recommend the video at the link.

Bad Lieutenant said...

Me, hell, I'd take the easy way out. Life is too short.
10/14/16, 11:39 AM

Coupe, hell, I'd help you. In fact, where do I sign up? There must be a waiting list.

R.J. Chatt said...

"You either control your disability or your disability controls you." A quote worth remembering, applies to emotional wounds too.

Wilbur said...

Fifty years ago, my alma mater, the University of Illinois, was a pioneer in accessibility for the disabled. In the 70's I lived in a high-rise dormitory whose residents included several students with cerebral palsy and other disabilities.

I learned that they were not stereotypes; they were all different in personality and approach to life. One fellow in particular was a grade-A nasty guy who just was perpetually mad at the world. Just like people in general, the variation is immense.

coupe said...

Bad Lieutenant said......I'd help you.

I hear a mouse...

Here kitty, kitty, kitty...

Josephbleau said...

This gentleman must be "comfortable" in order to afford his experiences. Wealth makes things possible that will not accrue to the lessers. Every one should be taxed more to create equal outcomes.

Deanna said...

Recently read Dr. Doidge's book "The Brain That Changes Itself". Neuroplasticity is a new and exciting field, especially in the field of pain management. It's revolutionized the approach to his patients of the pain Dr. I work for. We need to be not only life-long learners intellectually, but also physically.

Bad Lieutenant said...

?

Just words, Coop. Making less sense than usual, which come to mention it, is kind of stretching.