July 1, 2016

The bee of the day...

P1150425

16 comments:

Quaestor said...

Hornet.

tim in vermont said...

In 2012, Mezvinski, the husband of Chelsea Clinton, created a $325 million basket of offshore funds under the Eaglevale Partners banner through a special arrangement with investment bank Goldman Sachs.

[N]ewly released emails from 2012 show that she and Clinton Foundation consultant, Sidney Blumenthal, shared classified information about how German leadership viewed the prospects for a Greek bailout. Clinton also shared “protected” State Department information about Greek bonds with her husband at the same time that her son-in-law aimed his hedge fund at Greece.


Unknown and Shiloh to be along shortly to explain that Trump's lack of a tie in Scotland disqualifies him for the presidency.

All Dick Cheney did was convene a bunch of oil industry executives to make a plan, and here a decade later we are self sufficient in oil production and he is a hated man, but the Clintons? They are just clever business people, doing business the way it ought to be done!

Chuck to be along to explain how this story discredits Trump.

coupe said...

10-year-old wins PhD-level fellowship

Fun story about a young girl who loves programming her robot, but she needs some help, and so would like to have a mentor at the fellowship because she wants to learn.

She got accepted!

"The streets of Paris are sad. I want to build a robot that will make them happy again," Eva wrote in an application letter.

Here is her Web Page

pm317 said...

Spot the bee contest!

Clayton Hennesey said...

Quaestor's right, that's a yellow jacket, a social wasp which makes a basketball-sized nest underground, not a bee. When Meade mows over it, he will have the opportunity to photograph many more.

Meade said...

"When Meade mows over it" he'll give them one opportunity to not sting him. Otherwise, it's war. Chemical war.

Meade likes real bees, not wasps. Especially stingless bees. Stingless bees make good pets. Or so Meade heard.

Hagar said...

Bret Baier had an interview with Sylvia Burwell, Secretary of HHS, tonight.
All I could think of was "missionary lady."

Freeman Hunt said...

One day we were at the park. One son watched as his friend carried mud clods over to the opening of yellow jacket nest and dropped them on it. Son and friend sprinted away. Another son, totally unaware of the mischief going on behind him, was examining some tree roots several yards away. A yellow jacket, enraged and simpleminded in the most extreme sense of the word, stung the tree-examining son, whose botanical tranquility was thus ended.

Quaestor said...

A yellow jacket, enraged and simpleminded in the most extreme sense of the word, stung the tree-examining son, whose botanical tranquility was thus ended.

He was very fortunate to have been stung only once. Yellow jackets deposit a pheromone on the victim when they sting which draws other members of the colony to the attack.

Simpleminded as they are hornets and other more sophisticated social insects operate with programming that puts our best robots to shame. Berkeley, CalTech, and MIT keep promising truly useful AI — just ten more years and 10 billion more dollars — and yet my Roomba is more trouble than its worth.

Clayton Hennesey said...

On the other hand, Meade, yellow jackets feed their larvae on the chewed up mash of caterpillars that love to munch on flowers, saving you from the trouble of doing so.

Meade said...

But Clayton, that's why I grow the flowers -- for the caterpillars. :)

Meade said...

To get butterflies, I mean. Not to chew them into a mash and feed my young.

I do have a human friend who eats cricket flour though. He eats it for medicinal purposes, says it cured a lingering injury in his lower legs he suffered from for many years. Now, after adding cricket flour to his diet, he's pain-free and reportedly good as new.

Mrs. Meade gently poked fun at him, asking, when he rubs his ankles together, do they chirp?

Clayton Hennesey said...

Not to chew them into a mash and feed my young.

Hey, no big deal. What happens in Wisconsin stays in Wisconsin, I always say.

tim in vermont said...

He eats it for medicinal purposes, says it cured a lingering injury in his lower legs he suffered from for many years. Now, after adding cricket flour to his diet, he's pain-free and reportedly good as new.

So can he rub his legs together now and make music?

Meade said...

I don't know, Tim, but he adds the flour to his 10 yr-old's pancake batter. The kid is growing like a butterfly weed, will probably top out around 6'3" or 6'4", and already has a lightening quick pull-up vertical that brings to mind a cross between Steph Curry and Jiminey Cricket.

rhhardin said...

My newly extended backyard antenna now towers to 44 feet, and has an elegant 8 second sway time at the tip under wind disturbance, even after guying.

Seems to work well.

Now it needs thunderstorm wind testing.