June 29, 2016

"The Spherical Droste Effect, with added twist and recursion."



Via Metafilter, which has some more links (plus discussion). Note that at the beginning of the video, they talk about what you should be seeing, and I could see that my browser, Safari, wasn't handling it properly. So I switched to Firefox, and that worked.

13 comments:

mikee said...

I am amused by the naughty t-shirt, too.

Paul Snively said...

YouTube is disabling this on Safari. Some resources I've found indicate this is because the Flash plugin for Safari is too slow at reading pixels from video, so YouTube chose to disable it rather than give users lousy frame rates. Hopefully this will be resolved soon, but given the lousy relationship between Apple and Adobe over the last, oh, decade or so, I kind of doubt it.

Rick 1100 said...

My wife will kill for Droste.

Smilin' Jack said...

tl;dw

bagoh20 said...

It works great with Chrome, but who slipped the acid in my coffee?

bagoh20 said...

I never saw that before where you can look around the room of a video while it's running. It's like being there. Strange.

Rob said...

Two guys so amused by themselves, so narcissistic, why aren't they on Morning Zoo radio?

Rick 1100 said...

tl;dw translation: boring

Quaestor said...

On my Safari 9.1.1 running on Yosemite the mouse inputs are ignored. Works on Firefox 47.0, and it works on Chrome 51.02704.106.

Quaestor said...

For realtime on-demand 360ยบ VR! Just $3500.00 and 24 GoPros.

Paul Snively said...

Rob: Two guys so amused by themselves, so narcissistic, why aren't they on Morning Zoo radio?

Actually, these are two guys who are very passionate about hyperbolic geometry, and having fun exploring visualizing hyperbolic geometry with the new technology of 3D video. Anyone who has studied, e.g. General (or even Special) Relativity will have no problem at all seeing how this sort of thing could help physics students "see" how dynamics works in relativistic terms. In this particular video, they're just having fun playing with the "hall of mirrors" effect, and angle-preserving ("conformal," although I don't recall them using the word "conformal" in the video) variations on it. They also play with the notion of "fixed point" (again, without naming it) a couple of times.

In other words, they're mathematicians making some fairly abstract concepts fairly concrete. Which I think is wonderful.

Bob Matthews said...

> making some fairly abstract concepts fairly concrete ...

Unlike politicians, who thrive by making some fairly simple concepts abstract and confusing.

EMD said...

This was very cool.