February 17, 2016

"Why Justice Scalia was staying for free at a Texas resort."

WaPo reports:
The ranch is 30,000-acre getaway that is home to John B. Poindexter... “I did not pay for the Justice’s trip to Cibolo Creek Ranch,” Poindexter wrote in a brief email Tuesday. “He was an invited guest, along with a friend, just like 35 others.... The Justice was treated no differently by me, as no one was charged for activities, room and board, beverages, etc. That is a 22-year policy.’’... A person familiar with the ranch’s operations said Poindexter hosts such events two or three times a year.... The nature of Poindexter’s relationship with Scalia remained unclear Tuesday.... It is also still not known who else was at the Texas ranch for the weekend....

36 comments:

Bob Boyd said...

"Why Justice Scalia was staying for free at a Texas resort."

It's the thinking man's Death of Scalia conspiracy theory.

Owen said...

Never let a crisis (or tragedy) go to waste!

Thrillers have been written with less fervid speculation than that quoted here.

Once written, twice... said...

".... It is also still not known who else was at the Texas ranch for the weekend...."

We all know the answer...
"HOOKERS"

Duh.

Freeman Hunt said...

Is it a resort or the guy's house? The article says that it's the guy's home, but the article linked about it describes it as a resort. Does the guy live at a resort?

Henry said...

You mean wealthy Democrat Party donor John Poindexter?

The plot thickens.

But that plot is tedious and stupid stuff.

The thing that is interesting is that John Poindexter is a Vietnam veteran who in 2003 threw himself wholeheartedly into getting the men of his troop the medals he had originally requested:

The unit citation was what Poindexter wanted for his men.... He tracked down as many men from Troop A as he could and recorded their remembrances of that unnamed battle. He sought verification from other soldiers and from supervising officers. Also, he dug out an old manuscript — an account he'd written of that long day — then tore it apart, put it back together and published it himself in book form. Poindexter submitted the application for the presidential citation in 2004. It was 6 inches thick and weighed as much as a supersize dictionary.

Henry said...

More here.

The citation was awarded to Troop A by President Obama in 2009.

Michael K said...

What about the Italian prominentes who were invited to have dinner with Obama because he was tired of politicians ?

People like Scalia are always invited to things to be decorative or to liven the conversation.

I'm reading Gates' book. He was invited to events like this. He was invited and declined the invitation to the hunting trip that involved Cheney's accidental shooting of the guy who was invited after Gates decline.

mikee said...

Don't y'all know that "comfortable" Texans often invite friends, and interesting folk they'd like to become friends, to their places for some good eating, good hunting, good talking? Down here we call that behavior "hospitality" and it is a good thing.

Has a Clinton never accepted, say, a free trip to the islands for some good clean fun? Or free underage sex slave fun? Well, this sort of thing is like that, but without the underage sex slave fun. Some of us have what are called "standards."

jaed said...

I find myself being interested in Scalia's friend.

Also, what Freeman Hunt asked. Is it a "resort", or a residence? If it's one of Poindexter's homes then it mystifies me why anyone would expect a guest to pay.

Eric the Fruit Bat said...

No cash, but maybe they all had to do chores.

Tari said...

Freeman Hunt - it's both. I assume sometimes he shuts the ranch to paying guests and uses it for himself. But other times the ranch takes in ordinary folk (the kind who pay $600/night, anyway) - it's elaborate version of renting out your vacation home on VRBO.

Original Mike said...

"Cheney's accidental shooting of the guy who was invited after Gates decline."

Interesting.

Marc Puckett said...

Coincidences, coincidences. I'd never heard of VRBO until yesterday evening; a friend has to find a house etc for family who'll be in the LA area for a week.

The more pressing question so far as I'm concerned is, will Justice Scalia's Requiem celebrated at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception on... Sunday, is it? be old rite ('the traditional Latin Mass'), to which he was attached, or new?

Bobby said...

Michael K.,

Duty is one of the best books I have read in a long, long time.

MayBee said...

Interesting, after all the funerals he has gone to, that Obama will not go to Scalia's.

n.n said...

The patronage and views from Hawaii are better.

Tari said...

Marc Puckett, VRBO is the best, especially for people traveling with kids. We've used it all over - even to find apartments in Rome and Florence - and it has never disappointed. The very best part: you don't have to spend your vacation sleeping in the same room as your children.

Marc Puckett said...

Tari at 2:27, Yes, there are three children under the age of seven involved. The family are catching their breath, as it were, on a long trip from Sydney (via Costa Rica) to London.

MayBee at 2:21, "When asked whether Obama's Saturday plans [Scalia's funeral is Saturday, not Sunday as I had mistakenly recalled] include golfing, Earnest stressed instead that the president believes it is important to honor Scalia's life and service." (NBCnews.com)

buwaya said...

"Don't y'all know that "comfortable" Texans often invite friends, and interesting folk they'd like to become friends, to their places for some good eating, good hunting, good talking? Down here we call that behavior "hospitality" and it is a good thing."

This is a normal sort of thing for the rich anywhere. Especially if it involves field sports - hunting and shooting. The British aristocracy seem to have spent half their lives visiting each other and hunting each others game.
Heck, half at least of Wodehouse's books take place in some country house (i.e., a palace) hosting a bunch of guests.

Robert Cook said...

"No cash, but maybe they all had to do chores."

Also known as buying friends and influencing people.

Robert Cook said...

"Duty is one of the best books I have read in a long, long time." (Although the linked article is in response to a later memoir of Gates, there is value, nonetheless, in reading an insider's view of Gates.)

HoodlumDoodlum said...

Eh, whatever it takes to start a lil' smear, nudge nudge.

Simon said...

mikee said...
"Don't y'all know that "comfortable" Texans often invite friends, and interesting folk they'd like to become friends, to their places for some good eating, good hunting, good talking? Down here we call that behavior "hospitality" and it is a good thing."

That was my thought. Just the incredible urban parochialism of the WaPo, that there needs to be some explanation for why an avid hunter might go down to Texas to a hunt. If he'd died at fucking Disneyworld with his great-grandchildren, would they wonder what explanation there could possibly be for a man being at Disneyworld? These people have no clue whatsoever how normal Americans spend their lives.

Insufficiently Sensitive said...

The nature of Poindexter’s relationship with Scalia remained unclear Tuesday.... It is also still not known who else was at the Texas ranch for the weekend....

Looks like WaPo is just beside itself that it can't paint the occasion as some kind of horrible right wing conspiracy.

AReasonableMan said...

The face of corruption.

buwaya said...

"Also known as buying friends and influencing people."

Buying friends? No not really. Everyone there is guaranteed to be at least comfortably well off.
Lean and hungry types on the make are generally not welcome.
Influencing people - yes. This is the ancient way of it.

Where I come from it is (or was, in the days before impossible traffic) the custom for people in a certain social position to hold open house of an afternoon, most often on Sundays.
It was an open invitation for acquaintances, business partners, persons of influence, or anyone to whom a blanket invitation had been extended to drop in, have merienda (teatime) and chat.
Lacking hunting venues in the country, the same sort of invitation would be extended for golf, for dropping by the Polo Club as a guest, for the summer house in the mountains, for the beach house.

AReasonableMan said...

buwaya said...
Where I come from it is


This is not meant harshly, but where does where you come from rank on international corruption indices?

traditionalguy said...

It's Texas , Jake.

buwaya said...

Corruption indices of the old country -

Very very high at some points, not so bad in the good old days when the government barely existed.
Point is, its universal, the tendency to country society, corruption or no.

In the 19th century Britain was effectively ungoverned, or rather unregulated for the most part, hence any tendency to corruption, as in stealing from the public purse, had little to corrupt. Or corruption was a mater of private negotiations of power at venues like this, hidden from public view. It seems to me though that such will always happen and any dislike of such personal dealings is quixotic.

dwick said...

mikee said...
Don't y'all know that "comfortable" Texans often invite friends, and interesting folk they'd like to become friends, to their places for some good eating, good hunting, good talking? Down here we call that behavior "hospitality" and it is a good thing.

Yep... Caro wrote about it numerous times in his books on LBJ - I'm sure Althouse knows it as she's mentioned she was reading the books here before. LBJ and Abe Fortas were best buds.
(Ironically, Fortas ended up resigning from the Supreme Court after disclosure of a secret $20K/year retainer from the family foundation of a Wall Street financier (the very kind of deal LBJ used as currency for years to get his way in the Senate)

buwaya said...

If you want a famous US example of a country retreat of the movers and shakers -
The Bohemian Grove -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bohemian_Grove

I suggest that this sort of institution no longer exists in its original form, which is a bad thing as the guest list of such places was much broader than the constrained circles of influence among todays elite. This was one of those nonofficial mediating institutions.
Granted, the goings on at the Bohemian Grove could get much odder than (I assume) at some Texas hunting lodge.

Michael said...

buwaya

I have been to what they call the Spring Jinx at the Bohemian Grove; the one session where California non-members can be invited. The major event is for members and out of state guests only. I am not sure it is much changed from when it began. There are camps within the grove, each with their own character and all in different styles ranging from very basic to posh. Some serious lectures, entertaining plays and musicals and much drunkenness.
Best as I could tell there was no business being discussed. Just that old horror of men having fun without women.

buwaya said...

Very good of you to comment on the Bohemian Grove, as I have never been.
The legend of it is probably not the same as the reality of course.

PeterK said...

wish the liberal press would pay this much attention to the places where President Obama stays

Jim Howard said...

Is it a resort or the guy's house?

Let me Google that For you

Rusty said...

Blogger AReasonableMan said...
The face of corruption.

Don't be so hard on yourself. I'm sure you're a reasonably honest man, for a liberal. Which, come to think about it, isn't saying much.