November 1, 2013

"Cooking with hay may be increasingly fashionable…"

"… but its origins are far from sophisticated and most likely date back to medieval England and France, where cooking 'au foin' (with hay) was a practical way to deal with dried grass."
Teddy Diggs, the executive chef at Ripple in Washington, D.C., smokes a handful of dishes with hay, but also utilizes it as an ingredient in a few notable entrees. His smoked goat casoncelli…. features hay-smoked goat as well as a hay reduction…. “For me,” Diggs says, “hay implements flavor and sets a back note, as well as the stage for everything to work around it.”

9 comments:

MadisonMan said...

Pity the chef who smokes something with hay only to find out, later, that some poison ivy was embedded within the hay.

Hagar said...

Dry hay ... in England?

French cooking (snails, froglegs, old roosters, etc.) is supposed to have come about because the "goddamns" plundered all their livestock, and I suppose the English may also have taken their firewood, and anything else that would burn, for campfires.

Hunter McDaniel said...

This method of cooking only works while the sun shines.

Lord Ben said...

Step 1: Feed Hay to an animal.
Step 2: Eat the animal.

I love cooking with hay!!

Bob R said...

I've seen the ham in the hay recipe, but never tried it. But mostly this reminded me of an NPR April Fools Day spoof on compost as a new culinary trend. Alice Waters played along.

Crunchy Frog said...

Step 1: Feed Hay to an animal.
Step 2: Eat the animal.


Vegetarianism by proxy. I eat the things that eat plants.

Foobarista said...

Maybe we can go seriously old-school and go for that unique flavor from meat smoked over dried cow-patties? After all, it powered Genghis Khan and his horde to conquer most of Eurasia...

joethefatman said...

Using hay in this manner may be for the best. It gives the veneer of respectability to what may wind up a dietary staple in the future. Whether for use as cooking fuel or an ingredient in what has been cooked.

Rusty said...

Over educated snobs will believe anything.


Hay seared horse.


Otherwise known as a barn fire.