June 11, 2013

"Police Clash with Protesters in Istanbul."

Dramatic photography here.

9 comments:

edutcher said...

Saw one where they'd just jammed the bridge over the Bosporous - very impressive.

Makes you wonder what it's gonna take here?

The Godfather said...

Terrific photos, but for each one I had to click through a NYT ad asking me if I want to subscribe. After I rejected the first one, you'd think they would have gotten the idea. If I needed an additional reason not to subscribe to the Times, they just gave me nine.

lemondog said...

Apparently the initial park redevelopment protest has morphed into an anti-government authoritarian protest.

The photos prompted me to look for photos of the
Chicago Riots in 1968_

Crunchy Frog said...

Thought Egypt would be the first Muslim Brotherhood-run country to undergo violent revolution. Looks like Turkey might beat them to it.

CWJ said...

These children are desperately trying to keep Mustapha Kemal's vision of a secular Turkey alive. I pray for them.

Full disclosure. I do have a dog in this fight.

Michael said...

The bridge picture is photo shopped. The first picture in the NYT is accurate. A very limited area where these protests are being held. I learn from people there that the provacateurs are outnumbering the legitimate protesters and are responsible for the rock and molotov throwing that is provoking the teargas and water cannons. I think the govt mopped up last night. Soon morning there so we shall see. Every protest east of Prague is not an Arab spring. This is not unlike the OWS bit that was going nwhere from the outset.

Phil 3:14 said...

Turkish spring?

n.n said...

Another special interest-sponsored protest. I doubt it will be as easy to prosecute as the "Spring" in either Egypt or Libya. Even Syria is proving difficult for the "grassroots" rebellion to effect a regime change.

Econophile said...

CWJ said: "These children are desperately trying to keep Mustapha Kemal's vision of a secular Turkey alive. I pray for them."

My spouse (who is from Turkey) are in Istanbul and Ankara this month. Outside of Taksim Square, there have been large protests in every neighborhood we've been in every night for ten days. Amazing how widespread it is.

The deep reverence here for Ataturk and his Kemalism can't be understated. Pictures of him (and no one else) are everywhere; his signature can be regularly seen as lapel pins, etc. The devotion to his somewhat incoherent principles is often mindless, but it has kept a the country secular.

Also, though geographically close, the parallels with the Arab Spring are limited.