November 8, 2011

Best value law schools — in terms of going into debt, passing the bar, and getting a job.

Wisconsin is #12.

18 comments:

ndspinelli said...

Well, unless UW grads leave the friendly confines of Wi. they all "pass" the bar, don't they professor. "There are lies, damn lies, and statistics."

traditionalguy said...

The rankings are for getting a good education (to pass bar exam) for the least tuition in a location that offers the most jobs.

And the winner is....Atlanta at #1 (and its suburb, Athens, at #5.)

we are also providing the next President for the USA at the lowest cost. And he comes with a weekly sex fantasy at no extra cost.

lyssalovelyredhead said...

Mine's 14.

And you need to consider that WI has that whole inherent advantage in the "passing the bar" part.

Pogo said...

I wasn't aware there was a shortage of lawyers.

ironrailsironweights said...

An even better idea: study engineering instead.

Peter

edwardroyce said...

Of course if you're white then getting in is more of an issue. God forbid that the word "merit" should have anything to do with it.

ndspinelli said...

Pogo, I believe all law schools need to go on a 5 year hiatus every 30 years.

Spread Eagle said...

"Best value?" For who? Of the top 60, only 10 are private schools. It has to be fair to say the taxpayers are getting hosed down bigtime in these states, including Wisconsin.

Mick said...

How could UW Law be that good when a high profile "law prof" doesn't know what a natural born Citizen is?

Minor v. Happersett (88 US 162) 1874:

"The Constitution does not, in words, say who shall be natural-born citizens. Resort must be had elsewhere to ascertain that. At common-law, with the nomenclature of which the framers of the Constitution were familiar, it was never doubted that all children born in a country of parents who were its citizens became themselves, upon their birth, citizens also. These were natives, or natural-born citizens, as distinguished from aliens or foreigners."


And if I am so wrong, why can't the "law prof" refute?

MadisonMan said...

It has to be fair to say the taxpayers are getting hosed down bigtime in these states, including Wisconsin.

Where is the evidence that the UW Law school is costing taxpayers money?

Triangle Man said...

An even better idea: study engineering instead.

I see this cruel joke all over the Internet. Send innumerates to study engineering? Trying to lower the curve?

Spread Eagle said...

Where is the evidence that the UW Law school is costing taxpayers money?

You're suggesting with a straight face there are no public dollars spent at a state school? Really?

To me the trick would not be in establishing that fact, but rather in accurately uncovering the extent of all those revenue streams and the ratholes into which they disappear. And it's not just Wisconsin.

MadisonMan said...

I'm suggesting that the Law School in particular operates without tax dollars. Do you have evidence to the contrary? It's your assertion that it's spending the money.

Triangle Man said...

@MadisonMan

I recall articles about the Law School getting budget cuts from Gov. Walker back in March. Perhaps he cut all the budgets, but until recently it seems they received some general revenue funds. The Med School receives about 12% of its total budget from state funds IIRC.

Unemployment said...

Professor Althouse, do you know how many recent graduates of your school are without jobs? Have you helped any of them get jobs? At graduation this May, it was apparently the case that at least 1/2 the class didn't have ANY job lined up. You couldn't be bothered to show up to graduation though, could you?

MadisonMan said...

It's a very hard thing to google search for -- put in funding and law school in a web search and you get a lot of links to scholarships.

RichardS said...

It would be less expensive still if it were easier in more states to take the bar after one or two years of law school.

P.S. As the dissenters in Wong Kim Ark (Fuller, joined by Harlan)noted, the founders may not have liked the idea that location at birth made citizens. They may have been following Vattel, or, perhaps, the logic of the Declaration--citizenship based upon consent and legal rules (ie: the children of current citizens but not the grandchildren of citizens so born who never live in the U.S.), rather than birth. Hence the 14th Amendment says "jurisdiction" not "allegiance."

F4GIB said...

All but 3 of the 20 are schools subsidized by taxpayers. How novel.