October 6, 2011

A brief history of "Shame" signs on Madison's Capitol Square.

This year, we've seen lots of anti-Scott Walker protesters carrying signs that feature the word "Shame." (We've also heard the word "shame" chanted over and over again.) There's this guy, from last March, carrying a commercially printed "Shame" sign:

DSC_0004
From "Shame, shame, shame. Where is the shame?"

But a discussion a couple posts ago — about the Westboro Church folk coming to Madison — had me looking back to an old post of mine from 2004, when some religious group showed up at a Gay Pride parade. I was struck by this "shame" sign...

7/18/04 Madison Gay Pride Parade

... and I wonder what it says about the protesters of 2011 that they are channeling old-time religion.

20 comments:

Dan said...

Westboro Church and the extreme left of Wisconsin: one in the same. The extreme left has a hatred of Scott Walker in particular and conservatives in general.
And the Westboro church doesn't stalk attack or throw beer on any from near as I can tell.
Both are pieces of crap.

Fred4Pres said...

I thought the shame was in wearing a bowler hat like that with those clothes. If you are going retro, do it right.

mesquito said...

Have you ever noticed that the very same people who decry moral issues in politics speak about issues in a language marinated in moral assertions?

Carol_Herman said...

Kirby? Wasn't the guy "from last March" named Kirby?

You know, Wall Street sees visitors from all over the world every single day! They take tour buses full of out-of-towner's down there. So, it's not as if a few thousand more adds up to much.

Great, by the way, if you sell latte's to go.

Ann Althouse said...

"Have you ever noticed that the very same people who decry moral issues in politics speak about issues in a language marinated in moral assertions?"

Yes, it's one of the main things I have noticed around here for the past quarter century and it's an insight that powers a good portion of the blogging I do.

nana said...

It is too bad you don't know people who have a strong faith who accept people they don't agree with and don't preach and yell shame. There are many of us who realize that we all have sinned and it is not our place to judge.

edutcher said...
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edutcher said...

Seems to me that the people using the word, "shame", most recently appear to be incapable of feeling it.

PS I saw an item somewhere the Westboro creeps are going to put in an appearance at Steve Jobs' funeral.

I guess servicemen's funerals are passe.

rhhardin said...

I thought Westboro was busy preparing for Jobs's funeral.

john said...

WBC also plans to picket Steve Jobs' funeral too. Between Madison and Silicon Valley, this plucky rag-tag group could be stretched thin!

Undoubtedly, they would appreciate a bit of the Paypal tipjar right now to help spread their word. Spreadin' hate aint cheap.

rhhardin said...

Moral arguments are not broken when they don't persuade.

Their function isn't to convince, but to take positions.

You get to see if it's a position you can respect, or if the guy is in that respect a moral idiot.

In which case the valuable social function is telling you what not to bring up in the future.

Ron said...

so the theme then is... "Come Back Shame! Come Back!"

check!

wv:identate "By their teeth, thee shall know them"

phx said...
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Kit said...

Have you ever noticed that the very same people who decry moral issues in politics speak about issues in a language marinated in moral assertions?

I've lived here for over 25 yrs., as well, but with my roots on Waukesha County. I can tell you that though I've experienced the sentiment in Madison, it's just as true with our neighbors to the east.

Shaming is such a waste of time. It never gets the results the user intends. Quite the opposite, actually.

smithdrive said...

Yes, it's one of the main things I have noticed around here for the past quarter century and it's an insight that powers a good portion of the blogging I do.

Honest question, would you call this "shaming"?

phx said...
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Michael Haz said...

Wearing a velvet derby hat and carrying a sign that reads "Shame" seems somehow redundant.

traditionalguy said...

Shame is a powerful control tool. The childhood memories of potty training and rejection by loved ones is a long memory.

To use it on other adults is like using a club on them when kindness would work.

Where do they find the church Lady types used as enforcers in religious shaming rituals.

They must be wounded people themselves that want to pass it along.

The college football comments on call in radio and blogs is a display of mental illness with intelligent people finding ways to lash out at the coaches the way they were lashed out at by authority figures in their youth.

The bondage of guilt, shame and condemnation is what Jesus preached that he had come to free the poor in spirit and prisoners from.

Canuck said...

The long long tradition of shouting "shame" in American politics.

In the John Adams HBO series John Hancock led people shouting "shame" in the first episode. He then urged the crowd to tar and feather a customs agent.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Adams_%28TV_miniseries%29

TMink said...

Covetousness is not only a shame, it is a sin. Class warfare is simply encouraged coveting. These protests are simply ugly coveting, envy, and jealousy.

Trey