September 2, 2011

"Now that is the way you open the college football season against a game but overmatched opponent."

A 51-17 victory for the Badgers.

41 comments:

traditionalguy said...

Give the ball to Ball!

The Wisconsin offensive linemen were not even working up a sweat.

It makes one wonder how TCU ever beat the Badgers.

A. Shmendrik said...

Go you Badgers, go!

Curious George said...

Who are they playing next week, Waunakee?

Triangle Man said...

Oregon State is next up. At least it isn't the terrible Terriers of Wofford again.

Dustin said...

This kind of thing doesn't send a strong message, in my opinion.

Such victories are very, very easy if you rely on your best players, and the reason many powerhouse football teams do not have the super lopsided wins is because they cultivate their second and third string players against weak teams.

Long term, this is a crucial step for a team to have a rich and experienced backup when things go wrong or players just get worn out from a much more competitive opponent.

It's also kinda a dickish move for the underdog team, which would get beaten by the backbench players, but have a much more interesting ball game.

And of course, for the fans, it's not fun to sit and watch a predictable stomping for several hours.

Color the conferences unimpressed. Every major coach understands the dynamic I'm speaking of. It's like running up the score on 'very easy' mode, which honestly sends the message 'I know I suck'.

ndspinelli said...

When I moved to Wi. in the early 80's the team sucked and they played a better preseason schedule than they do now. Bully syndrome. We got our asses kicked for decades, now it's our turn.

Kit said...

I don't think it's a bully syndrome - I think they do it because they can - the program is in a position to both offer these games (they're payouts, actually) to lesser schools. One school gets the $ for their program, Badgers get a win (usually)...and there's little BCS penalty for doing so.

As a fan, I'd rather see better teams in here, but I get why they do it.

Quaestor said...

At least it isn't the terrible Terriers of Wofford again.

Being an ACC alumnus I have a fond memory of visiting the Wofford campus for an away game (I got lucky and won the freshman ticket pool) where I got well and truly laid for my first post-high school experience. Southern belles have charm a-plenty, or did... I just visited their website, and boy does it suck. I've never seen a less attractive crew on any campus lately. Hell, Snookie and the Jersey shore denizens are better looking than these losers!

Ann Althouse said...

I'm still trying to understand the concept of "running up the score" (as a bad thing). When does a team cross that line?

Just the other day, I was accusing the Cardinals of running up the score on the Brewers.

Curious George said...

"Ann Althouse said...
I'm still trying to understand the concept of "running up the score" (as a bad thing). When does a team cross that line?

Just the other day, I was accusing the Cardinals of running up the score on the Brewers."

For football, it's keeping your starters in when the game's out of hand, or throwing a lot of passes, blocking punts, stuff like that.

In baseball it's pretty much just stealing bases...or maybe sacrificing bunting, squeeze play...when you way out in front.

Much more a football think though.

E.M. Davis said...

Just the other day, I was accusing the Cardinals of running up the score on the Brewers.

This is hard to do in baseball. Swings are swings, and sometimes they end up in the seats.

With football — up big — you can run the clock out rather than throw 70 yard bombs for scores. Hence, running the score up is easier to do within the context of play-calling in football.

I guess the analogy in baseball would be stealing bases when you're up 10-1. Something you don't need to do.

WV: chiantsm — goes well with some liverish and farval beans?

geokstr said...

The outcome of the WORLD CHAMPION GREEN BAY PACKERS - Obama Jobs Speech game next Thursday night should be interesting.

ndspinelli said...

In baseball it's pretty simple, professor. When you have a big lead, late in the game, you don't steal bases. You still try to score runs, but you don't steal.

Football is a little more tricky. With a big lead you put your second and third string in to play. And, really late in the game, you stop passing the ball. But a lot of the honorable stuff has been put aside in the college football culture.

garage mahal said...

I'm still trying to understand the concept of "running up the score" (as a bad thing).

The old comeback to that is "if you don't like it, stop it". Although I was sheepishly watching Wisconsin tattooing Indiana last year by 63 points, 83-20. For some reason it doesn't bother me in college athletics.

MikeinAppalachia said...

Odd that UNLV managed to score 17 points. Sometimes this kind of a schedule can come back to haunt you. Mich vs Appalachian State comes to mind. While Ohio State schedules Ohio-based MAC teams due to the Ohio legislature, will be interesting to see how they do vs Akron with 9 projected starters suspended or gone.

Quaestor said...

The outcome of the WORLD CHAMPION GREEN BAY PACKERS - Obama Jobs Speech game next Thursday night should be interesting.

Unfortunately, NBC has the franchise of both events. Look forward to major suckage on both the game coverage (NBC still hasn't figured out football on television after 65 years) and on the Obama teleprompter-assisted presidency salvation exercise.

Original Mike said...

"With football — up big — you can run the clock out rather than throw 70 yard bombs for scores."

Last year, Wisconsin didturn to the running game (to "run the clock out") and several teams simply could not stop them. Makes it hard to keep the score down.

SunnyJ said...

Number one here, and don't ever forget it...these underdogs live to get their chance on the big stage. And, would rather take an asswhipping from a top team, provided they show up and play their hearts out, on the big stage then win 300-0 against somebody lower than themselves.

In competition it's known as "playing up" and it's mandatory for getting better at your skill both individually and as a team. Just like it's mandatory in strength training your muscle groups by overloading them into fatigue, for them to rest and build more cells and get stronger. The over projection of the "feel good" PC society where the very idea of honorable defeat has been replaced by everybody gets a trophy confuses and covers up the dynamics of the universe at play here.

Althouse asks a really good question regarding the moments in time when gluttony produces bad manners at the sports table.

Perhaps it's like pornography...the know it when you see it rule...to be debated into eternity as those viewing it have an infinite number of views and perceptions. The win starts to feel bad. Not exactly a science. If the team plays clean, is not excessive in trying to score or be overly aggressive...and in paticular if the losing team continues to play with heart and also attempts to keep winning...then all ends well. Dirty play, excessive attempts to score, not allowing other members of the team to substitute and a disheartened opposing team will tip the balance and the winners look like losers and the losers look like winners.

Ann Althouse said...

I'm just kidding about baseball. I don't think you ever have enough runs.

Now, here's the baseball question I have, which I don't know the answer:

What is the largest score gap that was closed after 2 men were out in the ninth? The team has to actually go on to win. I'm not making a top-of-the-ninth/bottom-of-the-ninth distinction. I just want a big score gap, like 10-1. It's the 9th inning and there are already 2 outs, but the team comes back. What was the largest gap closed in that situation.

Also, I'd be interested to know the most runs scored in an inning after there are 2 outs.

Ann Althouse said...

You can see why I like those questions. You're watching an inning and there are already 2 outs. I don't give up then. I'm like: Now's your chance to do that thing where you show how many runs you can get as long as you still have one out to go.

Ann Althouse said...

That's the difference between baseball and those other sports.

Kit said...

Number one here, and don't ever forget it...these underdogs live to get their chance on the big stage. And, would rather take an asswhipping from a top team, provided they show up and play their hearts out, on the big stage then win 300-0 against somebody lower than themselves.

And a very close #2 (some would argue it's actually #1) is a nice guaranteed payout (usually more than their gate receipts would have been for a home game vs. a relative equal).

Curious George said...

In the 1968 Ohio State v. Michigan game (arguably college footballs biggest rivalry), Ohio State went for two (and made it) after a TD put them up 48-14 late in the game.

When reporters aksed why he did it, coach Woody Hayes said; "Because the rules won't let you go for three."

There's a similar story about the Bengal's Sam Wyche being asked if he had any regrets about running up a score on the Oilers...they went fora 4th down conversion and scored and then did an onside kick after they were up 45-0...he said his only regret was that they missed an extra point.

Ann Althouse said...

"In competition it's known as "playing up" and it's mandatory for getting better at your skill both individually and as a team."

Hey, that's like "punching up" in blogging!

Curious George said...

"Ann Althouse said...
That's the difference between baseball and those other sports."

Close. Think the bigger picture... you are never out of a game. You can always come back. There is no clock in baseball.

shake-and-bake said...

Some call this sort of scheduling cowardice. I tend to agree, and am disappointed that my favorite team (Cal) is engaging in it. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/threedotblog/detail?entry_id=96510&tsp=1

ndspinelli said...

Well Ann, if your team keeps stealing bases w/ a huge lead, either your pitcher or best hitter will get plunked w/ a 95 mph fastball right in the fucking ribs. That should "get your mind right" as they said in Cool Hand Luke. Either that, or when you give your baserunner the steal sign they'll give you the finger, knowing they don't want to get one in the ribs. You can still swing for gthe fences, take an extra base on a ball in the gap, score as many runs as you can. Stealing w/ a huge lead is just not honorable. But then again..you're an attorney.

Tank said...

Rutgers wins 48 to 0.

Beat two tomatoes and an onion.

Still. 48 to Zero (an Obama like score).

Rutgers is number one.

Curious George said...

My apoligies Ann, I see you understand the "always come back" from later posts.

Kudos!

As far as two out 9th comebacks, googled this:

"The record for most runs scored in the bottom of the 9th after two were out is 9. The Cleveland Blues (now Indians) scored 9 runs to beat Washington 14-13 on May 21, 1901. The rally started after there were two outs and no one on base."

As a Cub fan this is my fondest memory. Not quite what you were looking for but an example of how a game is never over. the Cub's Ryne Sanberg hit game-tying two run homers in ninth and tenth and the Cubs went on to win by one.

The Sandberg Game W3Schools

ndspinelli said...

Regarding your question of the biggest 2 out rally, some stat geek can look that up, I got to go. However, the most famous 2 out rally was game 6 of the 1986 World Series. The Red Sox had a 2 run lead in the 10th inning against the Mets in NY. There were 2 out, the Red Sox were one out away from winning the Series. The Mets rallied for 3 to win that game and of course went on to win game 7. Bill Buckner was the goat.

edutcher said...

As to running up the score, John Madden's answer pretty much nails it, "Wadda ya want 'em to do, stop playing?".

Ann Althouse said...

Now, here's the baseball question I have, which I don't know the answer:

What is the largest score gap that was closed after 2 men were out in the ninth? The team has to actually go on to win. I'm not making a top-of-the-ninth/bottom-of-the-ninth distinction. I just want a big score gap, like 10-1. It's the 9th inning and there are already 2 outs, but the team comes back. What was the largest gap closed in that situation.

Also, I'd be interested to know the most runs scored in an inning after there are 2 outs.


If she missed it, Meade should rent "City Slickers" for her.

You can see why I like those questions. You're watching an inning and there are already 2 outs. I don't give up then. I'm like: Now's your chance to do that thing where you show how many runs you can get as long as you still have one out to go.

Often, by then, you're both tired and demoralized.

Calypso Facto said...

Hey, that's like "punching up" in blogging!

Like Emily's Post v. Althouse??

traditionalguy said...

Georgia Tech once stopped after the score reached 222 to 0.

Wikitorix said...

As far as two out 9th comebacks, googled this:

"The record for most runs scored in the bottom of the 9th after two were out is 9. The Cleveland Blues (now Indians) scored 9 runs to beat Washington 14-13 on May 21, 1901. The rally started after there were two outs and no one on base."


Also that year, the Boston Americans (now the Red Sox) scored 9 with 2 outs in the 9th to beat the Milwaukee Brewers (now the Baltimore Orioles). Boston was already ahead before that, though.

In 1929, Cleveland scored 9 with 2 outs in the ninth to overcome a one-run deficit against New York.

In the National League, the record is 7. The Cubs scored 7 to overcome a six-run deficit against the Reds in 1952.

Also, in 1973, the Giants overcame a six-run deficit against the Pirates with 7 runs.

geokstr said...

Ann Althouse said...
You can see why I like those questions. You're watching an inning and there are already 2 outs. I don't give up then. I'm like: Now's your chance to do that thing where you show how many runs you can get as long as you still have one out to go.


Which should also be a reminder with regards to next years election, with all the polls saying that a stalk of broccoli is within the margin of error.

The big cliche has always been about "X" months being an eternity until the next election. But this time, we've got the most ruthless, lawless, power-mad administration and campaign staff in history, that will be armed with a billion dollars from, well, nobody knows for certain, and slavishly backed by 95% of the media, Hollywood, the professoriate, and the unions.

Writ Small said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Ann Althouse said...

"Close. Think the bigger picture... you are never out of a game. You can always come back. There is no clock in baseball."

Now, what are you saying that is closer than what I said.

And it's not as if there is no other sport without a clock. Think tennis and golf.

Ann Althouse said...

"My apoligies Ann, I see you understand the "always come back" from later posts. Kudos!"

Why should I be celebrated for understanding the basic rules of baseball? It's not rocket science.

Ann Althouse said...

"The record for most runs scored in the bottom of the 9th after two were out is 9. The Cleveland Blues (now Indians) scored 9 runs to beat Washington 14-13 on May 21, 1901. The rally started after there were two outs and no one on base."

Thanks! There's a record that's stood a long time!

Issob Morocco said...

October 22nd, 2011 a whupping that will last upon the Badger nation like a scar of Childhood Vaccinations.

Curious George said...

"Ann Althouse said...
"My apoligies Ann, I see you understand the "always come back" from later posts. Kudos!"

Why should I be celebrated for understanding the basic rules of baseball? It's not rocket science."

I meant understanding as in "appreciating". I don't think many people make the connection you made. All you have to do is look in the stands in late innings when the home team is behind (or even comfortably ahead).

There is a point in sports that have a clock that victory becomes unattainable for the team that is currently on the losing side. That point never comes in baseball. There is always hope until the last out. Appreciating that