June 8, 2011

Model Caroline Louise Forsling sues Estée Lauder for branding her as old.

She wants $2 million after a test picture of her was used in an ad campaign that she didn't know about (for a product she didn't use). It's one of those before and after pictures, where the before and after sides were shot at the same time.

Obviously, she signed a contract. What did it say? Is there some understanding that the test shot photo will not be used, that she retained some control over which products her image could be used to promote, or that her image could only represent youth and beauty? What went on before the lawsuit was filed? She's damaging both herself and the product by going public with the dispute, because we're all invited to stare at her aged face, in the unflattering photograph we might otherwise never have seen or noticed. Meanwhile, the company suffers from having their ad revealed as a fraud. I'm thinking Forsling tried to get more money when she saw how the photo was used, and threatened to file the lawsuit, which we're seeing now, because the company called her bluff. So, great, everybody loses. Except us, the consumers who might have believed a little too much in Plantscription serum by Origins.

(Personally, I never buy a product called "serum." It sounds spookily medical.)

14 comments:

Luther said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Shouting Thomas said...

That's some publication you've linked to.

One of the titles: "Allegra Versace: on shunning the spolight after battle with anexoria!"

She's shunning the spotlight by giving an interview!

Laughed my ass off just reading the titles.

Fred4Pres said...

The links do not appear to be working.

How old is Caroline Louise Forsling?

Ann Althouse said...

Oh, blech! Sorry. Links adjusted. Should work now.

Seeing Red said...

Does she look older than 35 in that ad?

I use serum & love it.

Michael K said...

Since I don't believe any of those ads, it's hard to get too excited. The companies certainly make billions off women's insecurities.

edutcher said...

She does look older than 35 (compare with someone like Christina Hendricks (also 35)), but that's what happens if you cook yourself in the sun.

Not unlike the story of the DaVinci (Rembrandt?) painting of the Last Supper where a man was picked to pose as Judas by the artist and burst into tears. When asked why, he said that he had been the artist's model for Christ several years before.

PS Agree with Ann on the serum thing. Serum is technically a blood product, definitely something to approach with caution, although it's a popular marketing gimmick these days.

Shanna said...

You mean those time lapse ads aren't real?

Seriously, I can see why she's pissed.

EDH said...

A look behind the door at the filthy underbelly of the before-and-after male modelling world.

gerry said...

"Serum".

There's a lot of pseudoscience in the cosmetic biz.

traditionalguy said...

When we define Serums as concoctions for human blood then serums are the best way to give and receive life. Man's desire to find the Fountain of Youth never goes away. And what ever happened to Geritol that was a liquid to cure "Tired blood"?

Fred4Pres said...

Does she have a Tyler hammer toe? Because that would be bad.

Methadras said...

The multi-billion dollar cosmetics industry is a scam. A giant scam. I could take crisco, slap it in a nice looking jar, put a french sounding cosmetic name on it and sell it for a mint and become and overnight sensation. Of course, that is until I'm labeled a fraud by big cosmetics while they snicker at getting away with it themselves.

Sigivald said...

Does anyone ever believe those "before and after" shots are anything but the crassest manipulation?

Simply examining the lighting, poses, clothing, and expressions on them reveals that, in almost all cases (speaking of generalities, not this particular example).

I suspect that despite all that (or more likely because of it) they work, because most people aren't as reflexively hostile to such attempts as I am.