April 12, 2011

"She’s a great person to have cancer with, which sounds like a weird statement now that I say it out loud."

"She’s so strong and I admire the way she handles it, and it gives me the strength to handle it even better. I wouldn’t want to have cancer with anybody else but her."

NYT link to a story about a husband and wife, aged 38 and 36, who find out, within 9 days of each other, that both have cancer.

19 comments:

peter hoh said...

I feel a bit ashamed that I've been bitching about my aching knee and the general conditions that go along with having teenagers.

God bless them and their little girl.

JAL said...

Oh. My. Word.

JAL said...

Like Peter.

Joe said...

(The Crypto Jew)



I pray G*d lifts them up…man they have a kid….My heart and prayers go out.

The Grand Inquisitor said...

Peter takes away the important lesson.

Their poor daughter. I knew a girl who was devastated with her mom dying of cancer when she was young, and her response was to become a neurosurgeon. That's not possible for every little girl or boy.

edutcher said...

My best to them both. I've heard love comes from sharing the hard times, as opposed to the good ones, and learning you can count on each other.

If they can survive this spiritually, physically, and emotionally, they will have earned their place in Heaven and will make their Heaven here on Earth, as well.

Coketown said...

This is terrible. Before clicking through I was hoping it was at least something like lymphoma or thyroid cancer, which have pretty good five- and ten-year survival rates. But rectal and stage 4 breast cancer are bad. Those two are blessed to have each other, especially in this situation.

traditionalguy said...

They need a lawyer to do Credit Shelter trust wills.

Rob said...

A couple I know had Hodgkin's (her) at 40 and Salivary gland cancer (him) at 43, that is, they had their cancers three years apart. Ten years later they are both fine but I know the shared experience made it easier for the husband. Their son was 11 through 14 during the illness period. I always wondered if he thought having two parents with cancer was just a normal part of life.

reader_iam said...

Wow, just wow. How awful of a person am I that I can't help fixating on their last name? I'm not sure if the word is irony, or what.

I wish all the best and great good luck for them and their beautiful child.

Kurt said...

I wouldn't feel too terrible about that, reader. After all, her blog (referenced in the article) made use of the same pun.

And like others here, I wish they both recover fully, whatever the odds might be.

paminwi said...

This is what happened in my family, though it was my mom who got sick first. I was "lucky" enough to be in high school (age 16) when it all happened. I just remember my dad(who I had never seen cry in my life) say "This is what they mean "in sickness and in health" when you take your wedding vows. He asked that when I got married that I truly understand the commitment you are making to each other when you say those particular words. My prayers are with both the parents and their daughter.

EDH said...

I'm surprised the NYT didn't point out Republicans wanted them to get cancer...

And die!

Daniel Fielding said...

cancer is no fun, for thepatient, or for their loved ones. Iwas diagnosed wth brain cancer right about the time I graduated from Ann's Alma mater, and 13 years later, I amstill stuck in AnnArbor, still not out of the woods. My career and academic goals have gone to hell, and my illness has made live hell for m y parents and other relatives who live in the USA.

I hope that young couple have a better time with healingfrom their cancers, that I have. They need to stay alive to care for their little kid.
In my case being single with no kids, has made at least that aspect of cancer easier. If I die , no one but my parents will suffer.

reader_iam said...

Daniel: I noticed your comment, and more notable and important, what you wrote touched me. There's not a thing I can do in response that's at all practically helpful. Yet having been touched by what you wrote, about yourself and your family, I can't just skip over it, cast it away. I'd bet it's not true that if you die, *only* your parents will suffer. (Also--please pardon me for saying so--unless you have a child yourself, you may not fully grasp what that suffering of your parents to which you refer will really mean, and perhaps what it means already.) Fight on, Daniel, fight on. Your life is precious, and not just on account of/to you and your parents. {()} + prayers

dale said...

Now she is looking little different. I wondering her behavior is changing.
bodylift

Timotheus said...

It's not easy, that's for sure. I was just recovering from a bone marrow transplant when my wife was diagnosed with colon cancer. Unfortunately, her outcome wasn't as good as mine.

reader_iam said...

Timotheus: Oh, that's terrible. I am sorry for your loss, and I can't truly imagine what it's like to be in such a mixed place as yours: It's possible to beat cancer! Except when it's not! Or something like that--honestly, not having been there, I cannot know. All I can do is wish all the "best" best there can be, in *your* terms. And I DO so wish. Take care, Timotheus.

spidervein said...

My best two. To share the hard times I heard, rather than good, learn what you can rely on each other's love. Ten years later, they are good, but I know that sharing of experience, is easier for her husband. Their son was ill during the 11 to 14. I have been thinking, if he thinks there are two parents with cancer is just a normal part of life.
spider veins