February 23, 2011

"Where is the outcry from PETA?"

Asks a commenter at the Isthmus post about the camel the "Daily Show" brought to the protest.

Where's the outcry? Probably hanging out with the outcry from the Freedom From Religion Foundation over the Reverend Jesse Jackson leading a prayer (with the crowd of protesters in the Wisconsin Capitol rotunda):



(By the way, Jackson's prayer does not violate the Establishment Clause, and in fact, he has a free speech right to do what you see in that video. That is my official professorial opinion.)

25 comments:

Scott M said...

PETA's response will probably echo their stance on abortion. Since the Daily Show doesn't have an official position on PETA, PETA doesn't have one on the Daily Show.

Lincolntf said...

PETA, the Freedom From Religion Foundation, and the rest of the usual suspects will at most make a few tsk-tsk sounds.
They have positions, not principles.

edutcher said...

PETA's too busy killing little animals in its "shelters".

Ann Althouse said...

Where's the outcry? Probably hanging out with the outcry from the Freedom From Religion Foundation over the Reverend Jesse Jackson leading a prayer (with the crowd of protesters in the Wisconsin Capitol rotunda):

Very droll, Madame.

Phil 3:14 said...

I bet Ms. Baldwin was thinking:

Please let go of my hand!!

And as I mentioned before:

Old Time Religion

shoutingthomas said...

All those white supremacists found their token Negro!

Now, their suffering is authentic!

Those white supremacists in Madison are just like blacks in the Jim Crow south!

Hallelujah!

Richard Dolan said...

"That is my official professorial opinion."

It's nice to know that at least one lawprof agrees that, in a traditionally open public forum, one can speak publicly even in a religious idiom. Just one more proof of the exceptional nature of freedom in America.

AprilApple said...

Lord I pray for the workers.

yeah - the union worker whose dues help pimp the democrat party to the tune of millions. The resta you "workers" gotta shut up and pay.

I'm a Shaaaaark said...

The Outcry from PETA, and the outcry from the Freedom From Religion Foundation are in hiding across the state border at New Civility's house.

garage mahal said...

They'll be some outcry from the people of Wisconsin when they hear that Walker phone call. Considered planting troublemakers at the rallies. Wow.

shoutingthomas said...

They'll be some outcry from the people of Wisconsin when they hear that Walker phone call. Considered planting troublemakers at the rallies. Wow.

garbage tries to change the subject again.

garbage, you so clearly don't give a shit about anything but getting your hands on the swag...

What's your scam? I keep asking. You are so clearly a scam artist. I know that part of being a scam artist is keeping your cards hidden. But, it sure would be interesting to know your scam.

bagoh20 said...

It's getting to where one might wonder just what the left really is truly against other than any reduction in their power or income. Kumbaya!

bagoh20 said...

Garage, everyday like the sun coming up you come here to make a fool of yourself. On Walker, you have been overachieving.

Do you realize that what you say today will still be here tomorrow?

TMink said...

Only Congress can violate the establishment clause.

Trey

LakeLevel said...

PETA, NOW, NAACP, ACLU all are Leftist first and whatever their acronym stands for second.

Revenant said...

The FFRF devotes most of its energy to opposing government endorsement of religion.

It is pretty obvious that the government of Wisconsin doesn't endorse Jackson's speech. If the government had invited him there to give a prayer condemning the opposition, FFRF would have complained.

LakeLevel said...

AARP, AMA, ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, MSNBC.....

Milwaukee said...

shoutingthomas said...

All those white supremacists found their token Negro!

Now, their suffering is authentic!

Those white supremacists in Madison are just like blacks in the Jim Crow south!

Hallelujah!


Now we know why Rev. Jackson, and that other guy appear on Fox so much. I don't hear the Rev. Jackson complaining about being a token person of color on that network. He probably glories in it. Aren't there others to speak for the African-American community?

Can the rest of the country draw conclusions about a group that votes en masse for a particular candidate or party?

What do camel brats taste like? Are they one more thing that tastes like chicken? Or do they taste like venison?

Oclarki said...

White people praying in a government building = Gasp! A sign of impending theocracy. Black people praying in a government building = How colorful! Maybe they'll sing some gospel songs for us when they're done!

phx said...

A religious leader with wisdom will someday be in a similar position, and will look out to the diverse crowd and say, “I’d like to invoke a prayer to God. To those of you who don’t believe in God, please bare with us who do.”

That would give someone like me a chance to likewise exercise grace and tolerance by saying, “Not at all. I’ll stand respectfully by for you.” Which I do anyway in such situations, although it’s not acknowledged.

Jesse’s prayer thoughtfully asks God to “keep us humble.” Recognizing that there are people who might have different but equally strong feelings about religion would be a good start.

BarryD said...

They have positions, not principles.

To be fair, I can like that characteristic in a woman, even if not in an advocacy group.

Jum said...

Don't disturb PETA. They're deep into the intricate politico-moral calculus of determining whether a nice frothy outrage over a camel is worth harming the reputation of such a reliable and valuable friend as Jon Stewart.

It would be so much easier for PETA if Glenn Beck had been this stupid...

Hegemonkey said...

Where were the doctors to write a medical excuse for the camel?

Saint Croix said...

By the way, Jackson's prayer does not violate the Establishment Clause, and in fact, he has a free speech right to do what you see in that video.

Well, duh. He's a private citizen. Since when does the Constitution regulate private citizens?

Establishment clause jurisprudence often strikes me as bizarre. Finding speech wounds and hurt feelings and metaphysical pain. "Your penny hurts me with its God word on it." Your typical establishment clause case has no fucking injury at all. There is no standing. Why do you have standing, you atheist onlooker?

Like Roe v. Wade, which resolved that a woman with a two year old daughter had a constitutional right to retroactively abort her child in a hypothetical universe, the Court often has to violate its own standing rules in order to hear an establishment clause case that it so desperately wants to rule on.

This is why many atheists feel they can sue any old time that feel bad about whatever speech wound caused their brain to bleed. "A religious person is in a government building! Lawsuit, lawsuit, he must be stopped!"

It is no coincidence, I think, that the Court's worst cases, its most illogical and even vile work, first involve a violation of Article III. (That would be the part of the Constitution that is supposed to keep the judiciary in line).

mherzog said...

Here is a video on animal rights: http://meat.org

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