January 20, 2011

"When I look at her, I can see me. With that other lady..."

"... I would always be searching for stuff we had in common, but I had nothing in common with her... I'm so happy. At the same time, it's a funny feeling because everything's brand new. It's like being born again."

She was lost, but now she's found.

12 comments:

PatHMV said...

What a touching, moving story!

Unfortunately, the comments to that article were just horrendous. Almost all of them were mean-spirited and bigoted. There are times and places to discuss the problems of teen pregnancies and some of the perverse incentives of the welfare state, but if your first emotional response to an article like this is to rant about those things and start casting stones, you really need to reexamine your attitude towards life and the world.

Freeman Hunt said...

That's neat that they finally found each other. Can't imagine how it would be to worry like that for twenty-three years.

MadisonMan said...

Yay!

edutcher said...

Sometimes justice delayed is even sweeter.

Kurt said...

I saw this on "Good Morning America" this morning. (Don't ask why I still bother to watch that show in the morning, I don't really know.) I did have to laugh at the end of the broadcast, though, when the reporter said that the family told her "it was as if she had never been away." My thought on hearing that sentiment was, "Surely she's out of diapers and eating solid food by now!"

wv: clarr

Trooper York said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Trooper York said...

Just imagine how the monkeys that they took AlphaLiberal from must feel

Salamandyr said...

The point in the story where I choked up, was the description of the how the father found out his daughter had been found when he called the Missing Persons hotline to update his contact information after he moved.

After 23 years, he was still keeping his information current with the agency; still trying to find his daughter. I do not know if I would have the strength of spirit to keep hope alive for that long.

The Crack Emcee said...

That's cool! I love stories like that.

As I was driving home two nights ago, I got a call - my cell said it was a friend from high school - but when I answered it was a woman's voice saying, "It's your mother." I pulled the car over and gathered myself, in a sort of shock. My main foster mother (who I think of as my mother) is deceased, and the other two rarely call. My real (by blood) mother and I don't speak, but her other son just died so,....

Which one was it? And how and why is she using my friend's phone? "This isn't funny," I said, "Who is this?"

It was my friend's mother, "Mo". I had escaped an evil foster home once, and, not knowing what else to do, went to their house for a few nights. Mo was the one who suggested I join the Navy. Only when it became clear it was her was I finally able to exhale. My friend, her son, laughed in the background. I felt like I had been hit over the head with a hammer.

Anyway, if you've got an intact family, feel lucky:

The weirdness never gets old.

The Crack Emcee said...

After 23 years, he was still keeping his information current with the agency; still trying to find his daughter. I do not know if I would have the strength of spirit to keep hope alive for that long.

My real mother found me, after 40 years, once my sister read this story. They called the reporter and told him to let me know.

prairie wind said...

I, too, was impressed with the parents still looking after 23 years. Happy endings are wonderful.

Tangent:
But Carlina's grandmother said Carlina told her the kidnappers were abusive, leaving her home alone as an 11-year-old with a brother.

This is a funny example of abuse. Is it abuse to leave an 11-year-old home with a brother? I'm an abuser, then. The reporter or editor left out salient information, I think.

David said...

"The reporter or editor left out salient information, I think."

Like how old was the brother, and how long were they left? Given the kidnap mother's other traits, the answers are probably "not old enough" and "too long."