October 6, 2010

"Get ready for an awesome adventure through a roaring sea of high tides, swirling whirlies, and gushing geysers — all at speeds that leave ordinary river rides eating this one's wake."

When you read "one's wake," you don't think of the funeral-related meaning of "wake."

9 comments:

Richard Dolan said...

Perhaps not. But it's the 'eating' image that's the real problem. It's a lazy, worn-out usage. Holding a wake for that would be a public service.

Richard Dolan said...

As for the unfortunate 68-year old fellow who died, the article doesn't give any indication of the cause. I'm assumnig it was his heart. The short clip doesn't suggest anything like an "awesome adventure through roaring seas" - more like a fairly tame ride down a fake and shallow stream, which it what it is. As the Viagra ads say, you need to make sure that your heart can stand strenuous activity before plunging in.

Richard Dolan said...

Drill Sgt:

From the clip, there are no boats. It looks like it's just swimmers wearing life vests. He might have drowned, but that would have taken some effort (and a lot of callousness from the many representatives of middle America who were there with him). The water looks like it's less than 4' deep.

traditionalguy said...

Death Panels are invading Water World now. I would take his wrongful death case without hesitation.

Class factotum said...

For years, I thought the book "Finnegan's Wake" was about water skiing.

E.M. Davis said...

Swirling whirlies? Gushing geysers?

That is some serious Water Park Porn.

John Burgess said...

Having just spent part of the weekend on a boat, I never considered the funereal sense of 'wake'.

But, if instead I'd been (WV) oreping I might have...

ken in sc said...

class, it's Finnegans Wake, without the apostrophe.

ken in sc said...

BTW, if you have ever tried to decifer a James Joyce novel, you will enjoy George Singleton's parody 'Novel'.