November 21, 2009

At the New Tree Restaurant...

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... you can talk about trees, shoot the breeze, have some wine and cheese, do whatever you please. Dig in!

37 comments:

Lem said...

There is a tree on the left and the right.. depending on where you stand.

edutcher said...

You and Meade live on a nice street, Ann. Very Ozzie and Harriet - and I say that as a compliment.

You walk down past the trees and houses and you say, "I'm home", and you're glad of it.

Not everybody has that. You have a great deal to be thankful for this year.

ricpic said...

I hope this isn't a stupid question. Shouldn't the burlap bag around the root system be removed before planting? Well, if it's a stupid question so be it.

Chip Ahoy said...

Jeeze, those trees make me sneeze wheeze. Call the poleeze, please before I freeze.

Or else, here, have yourself an omelet.

jjm said...

Where is the hose to water these babies in? At least in Florida that is how it is done. You northerners sure are do things differently!

Penny said...

The omelet looks wonderful, Chip! But honestly, I had too much wine and cheese. I think I'll just wait for my pork ribs to be done now.

Meade said...

Every which way, this way or that way, good to see you, Lem.

Thanks, edutcher. True words.

Not a stupid question, ricpic. Answer is - no, the burlap should not be removed unless it's synthetic burlap. This was real burlap so it stayed.

Chip, Delicious and by delicious I mean dang that makes me hungry and I've even already just had supper.

jjm, That's right. Rain and snow will soon be here.

Hi, shiny Penny.

pm317 said...

Burlap is bio-degradable (disintegrates in about a year) and they keep it in to keep the roots in tact.

Penny said...

Edutcher's right about your street. It's lovely, and all the better because it's lined with trees. Yet you didn't have any before Meade came along?

I live in a tree-lined neighborhood myself, and can't help but notice how many people feel the need to cut them down. I assume it's to let more light in their homes?

Fortunately, ten, twenty years from now, another Meade will move in and do the right thing.

former law student said...

If I were mischievous like titus I'd ask if anyone here has ever been balled in burlap, like those trees.

But I'm not so I won't.

Penny said...

Had to laugh at that, fls. Surely we must have ONE scarecrow here at Althouse?

*taps together her red slippers*

EDH said...

After all that work, Meade deserves a massage.

wv- "sychipp" = a new government health insurance program for young sycophants

Jason (the commenter) said...

Two trees, an elm and a serviceberry, Meade and Althouse.

Penny said...

OK, then, EDH. If that's how it works, I guess I could break up a few clumps of dirt around that tree and wait for the massager myself.

Not a bad plan, actually.

Lem said...

See Tree Planting Detail page 7 of 8.

David said...

Meade is putting down roots.

Henry said...

It's the Althouse blog of culture, law, politics, and now, horticulture!

Love it.

Palladian said...

You can lead a horticulture but you can't make her think.

Robin said...

Nice picture of Meade doing manly outdoor work.

Hector Owen said...

"You can lead …" said Dorothy.

Meade, do you have any better advice for getting rid of yellow nutsedge than this? This nasty stuff turned up in the yard a couple of years ago and does not want to go away.

Albatross said...

Penny: I live in a tree-lined neighborhood myself, and can't help but notice how many people feel the need to cut them down. I assume it's to let more light in their homes?

Or to let more light to the grass. In Texas, the live oak trees keep their leaves pretty much year round. As their shade spreads, your grass dies. It's a balancing act -- you want shade in your yard, but then again you don't want a muddy mess every time it rains. So you prune, sometimes vigorously.

Hector Owen said...

Another reason for cutting down old trees in a residential neighborhood is that they just get too big, and in a storm, could fall on your house, and — now that I think of it, that happened to my parents' house, many years ago, and had I still been a child, sleeping in the bed I slept in as a child, in the room I slept in as a child, I might have been crushed, or seriously injured, when that huge old tree came crashing through the roof.

"Too big to be allowed to fall." Should we have a Sherman Act for trees?

Dust Bunny Queen said...

@ Hector This nasty stuff turned up in the yard a couple of years ago and does not want to go away.

At least you don't have to deal with these horrors

Star Thistle

Nasty nasty spiny weeds that can actually kill horses, hurt you and make raised welts.

And Puncture vine

Little bastards hurt like hell when you step on them and flatten the tires of the wheel barrow and riding lawn mower.

Round Up is my friend. I buy it by the gallons.

Hector Owen said...

It's funny, Albatross, how there's another side to everything. I don't know about Texas, but my friend W. in Florida has a lot of those big old oaks. And you know? He never has to cut the grass! Because there isn't any!

Of course, if one of them were to fall on his house, that would not be such a bright side.

Margaret, are you grieving
over Goldengrove unleaving?

Hector Owen said...

@ Dust Bunny Queen,

My problems are petty, to be sure, compared to what you mention. Still, I'd like to alleviate them, if I could.

But now I see a new project: That Hopkins poem, with the accent marks, as written by Hopkins, in html. If I post that, on my blog, then … it will be on the 30th Google page, and might as well not exist. But I will be able to find it! and that's something.

Hector Owen said...

Done! Thanks for the photo, Althouse.

wv = lerit. A winter bird that sings sweetly. In Connecticut yesterday I saw the first dark-eyed junco of the the season.

JAL said...

Does the city of Madison allow private parties to plant trees on public right of way?

Inquiring minds want to know.

wv guise
wise? or under the?

peter hoh said...

JAL: permits and conversations with the city forester were described in an earlier thread.

Hector: the best approach to weeds in your lawn is less lawn.

Hector Owen said...

Wine and cheese. By all means, let's. I just happened to have some around.

Kev said...

Add me to the list of those who think your street looks amazing, Althouse and Meade. It really does say "home" upon first glance.

Bob_R said...

Very nice. We lived on Chamberlain Ave. from 1985 to 1988. Very similar neighborhood. Thanks for the pictures.

michaele said...

Great picture of Meade...a man is so attractive when he is doing manly outdoor things.
This past summer we had to take down a 100+ year old oak that suddenly seemed waaay too close to our house. Within the span of a week, two majesticly huge branches came crashing to the ground on the non house side. The amount of damage they did to the lawn and surrounding plant material was significant and we suddenly realized the jeopardy our house was in. However, after all the work was done and the stump was ground, we prepped the area and planted a tupelo (black gum). It, too, will get large and someone in another 100 years might have a decision to make.

former law student said...

dbq -- roundup (I hope you're buying a generic, btw, now that roundup is off-patent) kills everything. Can you not just use a broadleaf weed killer, to spare whatever grass you have?

former law student said...

Also, trees have a lifespan like anything else. I had to take out a 40 year old ash that was toppling over in a storm.

The upper branches had patches of mistletoe, so I've reduced the druidic appeal of my yard quite a bit.

kentuckyliz said...

Several have noted Meade's attractiveness photographed while working.

I third that emotion.

Gardening:
the world's first profession

Ann Althouse said...

"Several have noted Meade's attractiveness photographed while working..."

I sure think so!

rhhardin said...

I planted this Norway Maple in the early 90s so that my Doberman Susie would have some shade to lie under.

It was carried home when it was about eight feet tall and fully leafed, on the back of my bicycle.

It didn't get big enough to cast much shade for Susie, but subsequent Dobermans have enjoyed it.