October 28, 2009

"30 Things Every Woman Should Have Before She Turns 30."

Let's see... I really need the list of 60 Things Every Woman Should Have Before She Turns 60, but I'm still going to see if I've missed any of these 30, but the next 30 things — think about what they are — ought to be much more interesting.

IN THE COMMENTS: Henry wrote:
1. Poverty
2. Train travel
3. Radio stardom
4,5,6. Roles as Elizabeth I of England, Sarah Bernhardt and the last Tsarina of Russia
7. Her own apartment
8. An earthquake
9. An earthquake fundraiser
10. A politician
11. Scandal
12. A union presidency
13. A secret marriage
14. A church wedding
15. Trousers
16. A presidential campaign
17. A rainbow tour
18. The Cross of Isabel the Catholic
19. An audience with the pope
20. A Time magazine cover
21. Hairdos
22. Paris couture
23. Cartier jewelry
24. A charitable foundation
25. Lepers
26. Suffrage
27. Mob appeal
28. Cervical cancer
29. Secular sainthood
30. A musical

(The Eva Peron version)

92 comments:

Methadras said...

Hey look, it's another stupid list to aspire too for no reason other than to say that you have a list to aspire too.

Beth said...

Why "should have" and not "should have done"?

Irene said...

"60 Things Every Woman Should Have Before She Turns 60:" A "Bucket List."

muddimo said...

31. Husband
32. Kids


Hey, we're talking 30, not 20.

traditionalguy said...

Aren't "have a favorite sex position" and 'have a great vibrator" the same thing? And where are the heir and a spare on the list?

Henry said...

I don't suppose this is a Baskin and Robbins list.

No, I'm not going to click through.

Tibore said...

Lists, lists, lists. What's all this about planning out your life so far ahead of time? Whatever happened to just doing things on the spur of the moment?

... STDs? Whaddabout 'em? Get'cher mind outta the gutter, you!

------

Word verification: foromati. There's an Italian food joke in there somewhere, but I can't quite put my finger on it...

Slow Joe said...

Toilet paper?

That's just banal.

Orgasm AND a vibrator AND a sex position preference AND a fav porn site?

Sounds like this list maker just wants women to have boring staples of sex that they can use to forgive themselves for being boring.

But as mentioned above, no kids? Women with kids are going to feel a heck of a lot better about life than those who are pleased to have enough charmin.

Feminism is not about being crude about the bathroom and bedroom in media. It's about being a real woman... with all the things that make a woman a woman, without having to compromise your goals and stature.

It's not about being a guy without a penis.

bagoh20 said...

Hate to be stick, but kind of a selfish list.

I would include: A favorite charity, a cause beyond yourself, 30 people who are better off for knowing you, a fund to leave to others in the event of your death, someone who calls you their best friend, etc.

Freeman Hunt said...

23. A good bulls**t detector

Have that.

It's getting readings off of this list.

PWS said...

I agree with Slow Joe. Too much emphasis on sex. That's the way men tend to view women. Four out of the 30 items are directly related to sex. Over 10%.

Ten percent - that would be 11 hours per week (excluding sleeping). I'm mean I'm a man and that would be great but let's get real.

What about spirituality, exercise, etc.?

It looks like Frisky didn't want to challenge/alienate its readers. I bet most Frisky readers did OK on that test.

muddimo said...

Very good point bagoh20. It is kind of a shallow list.


wv: houcluni, when George Clooney plays Houdini.

Freeman Hunt said...

At 31, she could add:

31. More depth to her life than having 4 of her 30 life goals related to sexual performance.

Freeman Hunt said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
bagoh20 said...

30 year-old women should replace the vibrator with my phone number. you'll save a fortune on batteries. It's the green thing to do.

XWL said...

"you'll save a fortune on batteries. It's the green thing to do."

Only if you walk or take public transportation, otherwise, rechargeable 'entertainment' would probably be greener.

Henry said...

1. Poverty
2. Train travel
3. Radio stardom
4,5,6. Roles as Elizabeth I of England, Sarah Bernhardt and the last Tsarina of Russia
7. Her own apartment
8. An earthquake
9. An earthquake fundraiser
10. A politician
11. Scandal
12. A union presidency
13. A secret marriage
14. A church wedding
15. Trousers
16. A presidential campaign
17. A rainbow tour
18. The Cross of Isabel the Catholic
19. An audience with the pope
20. A Time magazine cover
21. Hairdos
22. Paris couture
23. Cartier jewelry
24. A charitable foundation
25. Lepers
26. Suffrage
27. Mob appeal
28. Cervical cancer
29. Secular sainthood
30. A musical

(The Eva Peron version)

MadisonMan said...

My signature drink at age 30 was a an Awful Awful from Newport Creamery. Before that it was a milkshake from Mickey's Dairy Bar. Before that a Milkshake from Meyer Dairy.

Now it's a milkshake from Culver's.

Freeman Hunt said...

Or you could just get a husband. Have him right there in the house. Then she could practice all she wanted and wouldn't need multiple sex entires on her goals for age thirty.

Freeman Hunt said...

MM, LOL

My signature drink is coffee. Any coffee as long as it has cream in it and is sweetened. I am not picky about the coffee.

Old RPM Daddy said...

#31: The discernment not to overanalyze lighthearted lists (at least I hope that list was lighthearted...)

wv: ropym -- phrase heard at rodeos or male strip revues

Freeman Hunt said...

I think the problem with this list is that the person sounds very boring.

Also, I don't care if this person has a voter registration card.

Freeman Hunt said...

Even if it's light hearted, it betrays a certain outlook on life that I find obnoxious. It reads like a list written by and for twenty-two year olds. I expect more from thirty than that.

Ralph L said...

My signature drink at age 30 was a an Awful Awful from Newport Creamery
Awful good, awful big. My fav at age five.

Really pathetic that orgasm is on that list. Something men have by age 13.

former law student said...

It reads like a list written by and for twenty-two year olds. I expect more from thirty than that.

This is a very frothy website. But 30 is the new 20, I'm afraid.

That said, what woman doesn't want bras that fit, or enough toilet paper? (After I got married, household TP consumption went up by a factor of at least five.)

Smilin' Jack said...

But as mentioned above, no kids? Women with kids are going to feel a heck of a lot better about life than those who are pleased to have enough charmin.

“Across the happiness data, the one thing in life that will make you less happy is having children,” said Betsey Stevenson, an assistant professor at Wharton who co-wrote a paper called “The Paradox of Declining Female Happiness.” “It’s true whether you’re wealthy or poor, if you have kids late or kids early."--NYT, 9/19/09

Fred4Pres said...

Agreed. Done!

Oh wait, it is not like you need a man to agree to any of this, other than perhaps a couple of them.

traditionalguy said...

At least she did not list Recovering From Crack Cocaine addiction and Getting Onto Non-reporting Probation status. There is hope for this lady yet.

Synova said...

"Even if it's light hearted, it betrays a certain outlook on life that I find obnoxious. It reads like a list written by and for twenty-two year olds. I expect more from thirty than that."

This is my take on it, too.

On the other hand, I expect more but also expect less from a 30 year old mostly because I remember being 30.

On the one hand so much of it seems so utterly trivial. How hard is it *really* to find a competent person to do your hair? And (barring children) how likely is it that you're growing out of your clothes every five years? And *really* you should have been living within your means from about age 16. (You probably weren't, but you should have been.)

As for the sex part... I honestly don't get what is difficult about an orgasm... I can't quite imagine getting in the "mood" from a movie or song... and *really*, isn't a vibrator, besides risking discovery by a child looking for a pair of socks, unnecessary when going it alone and also, just possibly, is one reason these women don't know what they want a guy to do so they can get that elusive orgasm? Because seriously... men don't... um... vibrate.

Shocking as that fact may seem.

chuck b. said...

"(After I got married, household TP consumption went up by a factor of at least five.)"

I once had a female housemate associated with the same phenomenon! I had two female housemates actually, and the phenomenon was only associated with the second one. The guy before her moved out, she moved in, and our toilet paper consumption went through the fucking roof. It was conspicuous consumption that called a lot of attention to it.

Now it's the main thing I remember about her.

chuck b. said...

Even now, I can't help but visualize her in the bathroom, sitting on the toilet, unspooling huge lengths of toilet paper...

Gina said...

I was expecting something of substance from a website called frisky.com. Silly me.

chuck b. said...

A drag queen impersonating her would have a hard time getting the effect right because it would be impossible to sufficiently overstate the toilet paper consumption.

chuck b. said...

After several weeks, I asked first housemate what she thought about second housemate's TP usage, and she broke down laughing because she'd been thinking the same thing.

kathleen said...

Here's what one should have by age 30: A complete lack of interest in reading lists about what one should have by age X.

Alex said...

Screw lists - just do whatever makes you feel happy.

Beaverdam said...

I vibrate. Takes practice.

Beaverdam said...

Just checked with the wife. I aggravate, not vibrate. And I should stop practicing.

Beaverdam said...

I'll just put that on my list.

Synova said...

LOL!

William said...

Sex with me.

New Timon said...

What about a subscription to Frisky?

Chip Ahoy said...

Isn't a signature drink one you invent yourself?

AllenS said...

31. Menopause, without the baggage.

kentuckyliz said...

Vibrators make your nerves go numb. Counterproductive.

That list was really shallow.

The Cross of Queen Isabella would be really cool to us Catholic Geeks but the rest of the world probably doesn't give a crap.

Whoever wrote that list set their goals in life really low.

The feministas should be raging mad.

kentuckyliz said...

Menopause by 30?! You're off by a couple of decades. I wouldn't wish premature menopause on any woman, even the ones I don't like.

Shanna said...

How hard is it *really* to find a competent person to do your hair?

Depends on your hair, because I have a hell of a time.

I can't read the list, but why is toilet paper on there? How hard is it to buy toilet paper?

bagoh20 said...

#1 An imagination

Ralph L said...

why is toilet paper on there?
Some people haven't learned how to plan ahead, or they're used to Mom supplying their needs.

Ralph L said...

Vibrators make your nerves go numb
Video porn makes your imagination go numb

Amy said...

My daughter is 27 and I have to say that list totally rang true to me. Most of the commenters here (I am assuming a bit) are probably a bit beyond 30. Things have REALLY changed!!! 30 IS the new 20 and it is very frustrating for the parents, who were parents by 30, not working as baristas, uninsured, no savings, cutting each others' hair and running out of toilet paper with regularity (pun intended). I scanned the list and my daughter did rather well, and I saw that as an accomplishment, especially compared to those in her friend group. The sex references were fluff -but the health insurance, voter reg card, weekly income that covers rent,yearly appt with gyno and healthy relationship with parents will unfortunately disqualify A LOT of young women at 30.
Read it and weep.

Amy said...

My daughter is 27 and I have to say that list totally rang true to me. Most of the commenters here (I am assuming a bit) are probably a bit beyond 30. Things have REALLY changed!!! 30 IS the new 20 and it is very frustrating for the parents, who were parents by 30, not working as baristas, uninsured, no savings, cutting each others' hair and running out of toilet paper with regularity (pun intended). I scanned the list and my daughter did rather well, and I saw that as an accomplishment, especially compared to those in her friend group. The sex references were fluff -but the health insurance, voter reg card, weekly income that covers rent,yearly appt with gyno and healthy relationship with parents will unfortunately disqualify A LOT of young women at 30.
Read it and weep.

Retriever said...

Henry's list is great! At the list of sounding old fashioned (tho others here have mentioned most of these already) I'd say the list might be improved by:

1) husband she is madly in love with (get rid of the vibrator, porn, etc.)

2) kids

3)faith and a church or other religious community she loves and can contribute to

4) military service

5) A dog (their characters are better than ours, so they improve us, as well as loving us more than we deserve)

6) Living near elderly relatives so she can help them out when they need her

7) local politics she can involve herself in

8) a good education

9) an honest job

10) A garden, because nothing punctures airy fantasies about Gaia and the benevolence of the great organic chain of being than squash borers pulping your squash vines. Gardeners are realistic, stubborn and eternally optimistic. Think how much Jefferson loved gardening.

Synova said...

Maybe more young people should get married at 22 then.

I mean, seriously... those things are not an *option* anymore when you get married. You *might* still have a room-mate to help with rent, but generally you're scraping by, you buy your own toilet paper and groceries and you work to pay your rent. You might have to move in with mom and dad for a few months and be grateful, but that's generally a transitional thing as you figure out what you *have* to do to make it, not ding around living like a college student for years trying to find yourself and figure out what you want to do with your life... at which point you get married and everything changes anyway.

If 30 is the new 20 it's probably not the fault of the "kids", it's the fault of the "adults" telling them to "get established" first before going on with their lives.

DaveO said...

I don't think Ms. Duarte got her musical before she turned 30, though...

Michael Hasenstab said...

31. Four years of military service.
32. No credit card or student loan debt.
33. Money in the bank, earned herself.
34. A nice gun.
35. A working understanding of football, baseball and hockey.
36. Autonomy.
37. A drug-free brain.
38. Tattoos visible when dressed for work all removed.
39. A good grill and smoker.
40. A convertible.
41. Craftsman tools.
42. A well controlled Id.
43. A set of tumblers for drinking whiskey neat.
44. A place of her own, without roommates or parents.
45. Stock.
46. A good fly fishing rod, reel and tackle.
47. Curiosity.
48. Optimism
49. Charity.
50. An open heart.

edutcher said...

If you have any clue as to what really matters to make you happy to be alive (and damned few of us do, at any age), the rest is negotiable.

This, of course, is gender non-specific.

Synova said...

"4) military service"

If you are qualified (more people can't pass the physical than most people realize) and are the *least* inclined I heartily support this notion. (And if I can get through basic training...)

And it is most certainly a "do before you are 30, are married and have children" sort of thing (particularly if you're female).

I think the Army might still have enlistments of less than four years if four years seems like too much, but it's an experience that is completely unique that broadens your experience more than just about anything else short of the Peace Corps or a longer term missionary trip. The military itself is another culture... the equivalent of learning a foreign language improving your own... and if you get stationed overseas you get two foreign cultures under your life-experience belt for the price of one.

Or the Peace Corps, or a missionary trip longer than six months...

Seriously... if you don't get to reach 20 until you're 30 ANYWAY, why not actually do something during those years?

Shanna said...

Wow, I just read the list and it's pretty bad. This bugged me:

The name of reliable movers to give her friends when they ask for help relocating

How bout "being a decent enough person to help her friends move instead of pawning them off on movers"?

Synova, I don't think it's about getting married, but there are a lot of things you aren't going to learn if you never live on your own (meaning, not in your parents basement). I'm 31, so I'm pretty close to this list age, and two things I would definately have included are 1. have a savings plan for retirement 2. have a savings plan for regular expenses and future plans.

Shanna said...

Thought of one more that might not be for everyone, but my personal list included "live somewhere else (ie, not the town you grew up in) for a while".

Shanna said...

Gah, one more thing on the health insurance. When I graduated college at 22, my dad told me my new job better have health insurance, since I was getting kicked off his with graduation. Is that an unusual thing to hear from a parent?

Andrea said...

Michael Hasenstab and others who have the military in their lists -- I'm all for that being an option, but bit a "should have," because most women aren't suited for military life. Unless they bring back the traditional WACS and WAVS -- but that will happen when pigs fly.

And re all that sports stuff Mr. Hasenstab again: I find sports (including fly fishing) boring and pointless. Again, being into such things shouldn't be a "should have." Remember, this list is loftily claiming to be things a woman "should have" by the time they are thirty. I suppose that goes for husband and kids too -- there are a few women who aren't suited for married life and motherhood, and shouldn't be foisted on a man or a kid. (Though I do think it is... interesting the way the writer didn't even mention marriage or kids -- she mentioned so many ephemeral, unimportant things; she might as well have added "a cute rock star whose poster on your wall you just HAVE to have!")

Synova said...

Shanna, I was thinking of that in relation to what I said about military service but decided it was a tangent and skipped it.

Yes, I think that living near family is fabulous, but that moving *away* and not just out of the house, at least for a while, is beneficial in a whole lot of ways.

And you're still allowed to call Mom for advice on every little thing if you want.

lyssalovelyredhead said...

Synova: Amen to getting married older (and I would add, being serious about it, rather than just approaching it with the attitude that divorce is an OK option.)

Shanna: my dad told me that I was off his health insurance when I got married (which was before I graduated college), so I would guess it's not that unusual.

lyssalovelyredhead said...

I'm 29 and 3/4, and this list seemed nauseatingly young to me. To the point that I feel like I would find it silly if I were in college.

WV: weeni- this list is for weenies

Meade said...

Let's see... I really need the list of 60 Things Every Woman Should Have Before She Turns 60

Why not consult the genius of that great philosopher, Jerry Ragovoy?

He might express the notion that the one thing you really need by 60 is to be a good woman to one man who knows that all you ever gotta do is be a good man one time to one woman.

And that'll be the end of the road, babe.

Synova said...

" ...because most women aren't suited for military life."

How so?

Now, I firmly believe that many people are not suited to military life, men included. OTOH, doing something hard, that turns out not to be your "thing", for a few years isn't at all the same thing as making a career of it. We should all do something hard that isn't our thing for a while. (Even if it means sticking to a job at McDonalds.)

Women aren't suited to particular highly physical career fields in the military, true enough. But it is also true that any job whatsoever that exists in civilian life exists in the military. I was a computer operator in a shop that was almost exactly like the computer mainframe buildings at the university and at a department store chain I worked at. The work was the same, too.

So if it's not the *job* what is so difficult for women about military life, what is it? Getting up early? Making beds neatly? Shining your boots? Showing up to work on time and following procedures? Keeping physically fit? Dressing neatly?

I really am not suggesting that *everyone* should spend a bit of time in the military. But it's really not something that can be judged from the outside. I always put a qualifier on my recommendation... if you think you *might* want to do it, do it. It's not a forever sort of decision, and if you hate it it will still build character and you'll still have *done* it. Which is something you can never say if you decide not to follow that impulse. And it's definitely an experience with a sell-by date. Young and child-less is the way to go.

Ralph L said...

So if it's not the *job* what is so difficult for women about military life, what is it?
Following orders without question, or complaint, or delay.

There's a reason it's known as "bitching."


Here comes hell.

Synova said...

LOL, Ralph. :-)

Synova said...

Actually... in my experience the women in the military were "suited" to it while quite a few of the guys were utterly hopeless.

Not that some of the girls weren't hopeless too, but they still seemed to "get" it. Some of the guys needed constant mother-henning because they really couldn't follow a simple direction or find their butt with both hands. Now maybe it was just a case of pure numbers... way way more guys enlist than girls. Maybe it was self-selection... the hopeless guys never stopped to think that the military might not be their thing, maybe, because the military is a "guy thing"?

In any case, hopeless whiners or not, I really never met a female in the military who had trouble following rules or figuring out "the system." OTOH I did meet and work with young men who managed to strand themselves in foreign countries, or failed to even begin out-processing paperwork when they were told, or blew off a scheduled meeting with the First Sergeant and didn't realize that was *bad*.

(The female sergeants I knew sometimes had an uncanny and probably counter-productive (to the service) ability to work the system. OTOH, they knew how to get things done.)

kentuckyliz said...

Hasenstab wants a man with tits.

Seriously, you described my brother. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.

Joe said...

1) A contempt for lists containing more than a contempt for lists.

Joan said...

When I graduated college at 22, my dad told me my new job better have health insurance, since I was getting kicked off his with graduation. Is that an unusual thing to hear from a parent?

I don't think it's unusual now, but if Obama Health Care goes through and health insurance is required or you get hit with a confiscatory tax, I think things will likely change. How many parents will be willing to see their kids incur a huge tax burden because they don't have health insurance? I have not heard one person address this aspect of the insurance mandate: it's a significant additional expense for parents, and provides a further disincentive to have children. Is that really the way we want to go?

Retriever said...

Synova, re: women in the military. (I dare say this comment is so off topic that it will be deleted, but I read your comments with interest and chuckled at others) I considered joining the Navy (my dad had been in) back in the Dark Ages nearly 30 years ago, but decided against it as I didn't want to be a nurse or a secretary as most women were steered to be then in the service. Went to seminary instead (another woman who just didn't know her place!) but outran MANY, MANY husky young Marines in the Marine Corps Marathon.

One of our kids got into a service academy but ended up going to an Ivy instead, first in ROTC, now probably heading toward being a civilian doctor instead. Like me, a short mesomorph, mild mannered, feminine, loves men, but could carry a sixty pound pack without complaint (on Outward Bound the males whined far more than her about the bugs, etc.).

I agree with your point about self selection: I think women who consider the military are often better at following orders, working within the system in a disciplined fashion (if not "working" the system) than some brave, hyper young guy who thinks it would be cool to shoot up some bad guys after having spent his adolescence playing Halo 3 and World of Warcraft.

I think one real problem is that some guys (even heroic and decent ones who are good soldiers) still hate the idea of serving beside women, and certainly hate the idea of being ordered around by one. Chivalry/sexism/competitiveness/unfamiliarity/who knows why?

I have very little patience with men who see women as unfit for service because they stereotype them as moody, hormonal, weak, whiny, bitchy, etc. Or because they dismiss pretty women as hos and potentially disruptive in the military. Most civilian professional women these days have had to be disciplined, hard working, logical and negotiate enough social and occupational minefields that they can't afford the luxury of being a spoiled bratty wimp.

Of course some women in every field are hysterical ninnies. But equal numbers of guys are posturing bullies who would be equally unfit for the service of their country.

I am still staggered by the frivolity and selfishness of that initial list...not to be a judgmental jerk, but I can't imagine the emptiness and boredom of a life worrying about things like toilet paper, vibrators and the fit of one's underwear...

Kirk Parker said...

Andrea,

I'll second you on that sports bit, at least as far as "spectator sports" go. Now my own kids playing football, wrestling, or heck even basketball in high school is a completely different matter. But what the Seahawks/Mariners/um.. err... hmm.... Sonics (whatever happened to them?) do is a matter of supreme indifference to me.

Michael Hasenstab said...

@kentuckyliz LOL!

Actually, I have always been attracted to women who are into sports, who can hunt, fish, and fix things, like the wind in their hair, etc.

Glad to hear that your brother has her own home and tools.

Michael Hasenstab said...

I am enjoying, by the way, some of the comments above made by women who think that women aren't suited for military life. Whiney, whiney. Try getting in shape while in high school or college. Subject yourself to a few years of discipline and dedication to cause.

And don't tell your feminist sisters that a woman doesn't belong in the military. Sheesh.

6p00e55014150c8834 said...

To the folks who are dissing Michael Hasenstab--

His "at 30" list sounds a lot more like me than the insipid Frisky list. Yeah, it is a guy-oriented wish list, but then so am I.

Okay, I'm exaggerating, but I often kid hubby about how lucky he is that I like sports and cars and hate jewelry and chick-flicks.

former law student said...

Hasenstab:

I once worked with a lovely woman with hair down to the middle of her back, who looked to be the older sister of her high school aged daughter. She rushed home to their little farm every night of the week except two: the night she practiced with her handgun at the range, and the night she did cardio kickboxing. She drove a Suburban, not a convertible, though.

Freeman Hunt said...

I'm 29 and 3/4, and this list seemed nauseatingly young to me. To the point that I feel like I would find it silly if I were in college.

Heh. Same. I'll be 30 in December. I think that makes this list annoy me more.

RLB_IV said...

When Mrs. Meade reaches 60 she will have Mr. Meade at her side. Together they will carve out a life together in this world.

Only the present is important because the past is dead and the future is but a dream to be made real.

A toast to the future of Mr. and
Mrs. Meade and the future Grandchild. A 60's list should include Grand kids. OMG, they are a hoot!

Meade said...

Nice, RLB_IV. Thanks!

RLB_IV said...

Meade, starting a new life at our age is totally awesome. It's as if we can live two lives in one. I hope that you and the Mrs. experience a Grandchild. But if you don't, you have each other to explore the Earth together as you have in the Marriage Mountain Vortex.

howzerdo said...

I thought about this on and off all night - not that her list isn’t shallow and "bucket lists" aren't silly, but I was ruminating about what would be on my list?

Amen to bagoh20's #1 (imagination), Retriever’s #5 (dog), 8 (education), 9 (job) & 10 (gardening), Michael Hasenstab’s #48 (optimism).

I would strike everything on her list except #4 (because among trite things, toilet paper is pretty darn important), #5 (I’m into good hair), #9 (parents), #19 (tools) & #24 (courage).

Then I would replace the other 25 and add 12:

1. Felt proud of another
2. Given others the benefit of the doubt
3. Accepted aging
4. Learned to deal with loss
5. Counted blessings, daily
6. Laughed, daily
7. Hiked a mountain
8. Done hayin’, annually if possible
9. Grown tomatoes and other delightful things, including flowers
10. Ridden a horse
11. Drank raw milk
12. Read Mark Twain’s autobiography
13. Swam in the Ocean
14. Visited historic sites
15. Glued memorabilia and photos in scrapbooks
16. Made ice cream with snow in a hand-crank maker
17. Picked strawberries
18. Made dill pickles
19. Listened, often
20. Played a musical instrument
21. Baked an apple pie
22. Rewired a lamp
23. Make a greeting card
24. Volunteered
25. Visited cemeteries
26. Looked at the stars on a pitch-black night in a rural area
27. Realized the big picture will take care of itself if the little picture is in order
28. Loved a dog
29. Learned when to say “no”
30. Got enough sleep
31. Ate a mostly healthy diet
32. Learned life-long
33. Appreciated the sunset (not rise; I’m an owl)
34. Kept keys on an easy-to-find ring
35. Owned an Ameribag
36. Ate real maple candy
37. Enjoyed eggplant parmesan

Adding my 37 with her 5 and other commenters’ 6 (I know there are two about dogs, but dogs are just that wonderful) = 48, my age.

Christy said...

A trusted hair stylist is more valuable than diamonds.

Every woman should have, before she turns 60
- Doctors right out of school who will see her through until death.
- A trusted younger person on her accounts.

Because you want to enter your declining years with doctors you trust and who have known you for years.

Because by the time you actually need someone to make sure you've paid your utility bill, you are too stubborn to sign the papers.

Shanna said...

Aw Howzerdo, I like your list because it makes me want to check things off!

Question, I'm a southern girl, but what is "hayin'"? Just shoveling hay, or a hay ride or something more complicated? Also, Raw milk is hard to find, I hate scrapbooking, and we don't have enough snow to make ice cream out of it but I've done most everything else.

howzerdo said...

Shanna: thanks. You are allowed to use ice instead of snow in the south for the homemade ice cream :-). Some were a lot more profound than others! Some got added just to make 48, and others were forgotten. But hayin' is one of the most profound, I think. It is a memory I will always cherish when the point comes in the future where I don't do it any more. It is being part of a (hopefully large) group that is getting in hay as it is baled in the summer - stacking the bales in clusters of three or four in the field, driving the equipment to pick it up, loading the bales on trucks and trailers, riding to the barn on the hay, throwing the bales on the hay elevator, counting the bales as they come in, being up in the mow fitting the bales in (the last job is the hardest - it is dusty and hot). Afterwards, sometimes there is swimming - but always there are food, fellowship, discussing the year's hay quality, and reminiscing about past hayin' (sweaty clothes mandatory). Then there are the pre-requisites: checking the soil, monitoring the hay as it grows, planning when to cut it, and most important: worrying about whether there will be three days in a row of no rain!

bagoh20 said...

After reading the comments here, that list in "Frisky" is incredibly lazy and lame.

Henry said...

After reading the comments here, that list in "Frisky" is incredibly lazy and lame.

I was thinking the same thing. Althouse commenters turn dross to gold.

Stoutcat said...

Wow, I'm surprised nobody has mentioned Heinlein yet. And since I have his list close at hand, I will remedy that omission.

"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects."

Notice he doesn't distinguish between men and women: "A human being should be able to..."

Also, he gives no no age limit.

WV: potork--one of those mechanical sounds Walter Mitty is always hearing

amba said...

Then there's the short version, which I prefer.

amba said...

One could just skip the posts and marvel at the vws . . . "egadual" and "slystu"