September 5, 2008

Surprising fact.

Today, I signed up for home delivery of the NYT.

89 comments:

Spread Eagle said...

A rat boarding a sinking ship. As it were. No offense.

chickenlittle said...

Cancelled mine about year ago.

I get everything I need from you.

Sloanasaurus said...

I hear you get a free color photo album of the Abu Garib "victims" with your subscription? Wow! The coffee table book every liberal can cherish.

Brent said...

`

simon?

palladian?

a little help.



`

Mateo said...

You got a bird? What kind?

Bill White said...

So you bought an incontinent bird yesterday?

Lem said...

Catholics would called it penance and Charlie Hustle would call it hedging you bet ;)

Lem said...

Actually the NYT is not that bad.

vbspurs said...

Ann, what happened to your Kindle?

I know you don't like it, but I love reading the NYT on my Kindle every morning. No clutter with the papers, etc. Deleted with a click of the button.

I now have WSJ, NYT, Boston Globe, The Times & The Independent (UK), and Le Monde on my Kindle.

I'll only keep the WSJ after November.

Cheers,
Victoria

P. Rich said...

To welcome Althouse to the list of 12 NYT subscribers, here is a free editorial.

I have to admit that until fairly recently I believed that modern liberals had no principles. I’ve reconsidered after listening to an excellent taped speech by Evan Sayet from 2007. Watch it and draw your own conclusions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eaE98w1KZ-c.

Modern liberals do have principles; it’s just that sane adults will have trouble recognizing them. Borrowed and embellished, these principles are:

1. Rational thought is evil. Rational thinkers will examine facts and consider different viewpoints. This inevitably leads to conflict with the left’s approved version of “reality”, a shared indefensible delusion which exists independent of facts.
2. Indiscriminateness is a moral imperative. This underlies moral relativity and the notion that no person, or nation, or act is better than any other. In fact, the very idea of “better” or “right” is anathema. And wars fought to preserve conservative principles? Evil by definition.
3. All behaviors should lead to identical outcomes. One must not be allowed to “excel”. Think self-esteem theory and the attempt by radical feminists to push legislation which would dictate equal wages across widely disparate occupations. Think socialism.
4. Success is evidence of victimization. One can only rise above mediocrity by victimizing others, so wealth and success are proof positive of evil behavior by successful businesses and individuals – especially "old white males".
And finally
5. The end justifies the means. For the left there are no rules, moral and ethical behavior are antiquated and useless concepts, and any act or statement which promotes the cause is acceptable. This plays out constantly, varying only by degree from, for example, the MSM (grossly biased and distorted “news” coverage) to yesterday’s bomb-throwers (Ayers and Dorn) to today’s bomb-wearing extremists and leftist dictators – all of whom are lauded rather than condemned.

These principles are the foundation of the Democratic Party and the core beliefs of Barack Obama. They are why liberal policies fail and liberal beliefs cannot stand open, honest debate. These principles underlay/-lie the regimes of Stalin, Mao, Ho Chi Minh, Castro and Chavez - all of whom are heroes of the modern liberal in spite of the gulags and mass executions and suppression of free thought and expression. How can any rational, thinking citizen of the United States of America support such beliefs and their destructive consequences even if they are hidden behind clever political rhetoric? Answer: They can’t.

Lem said...

But if you are in Madison, does that mean you get today's paper? or do they print near you?

Trooper York said...

Hey you should do like your buddy Andrew Sullivan did when he went to buy a bird. They wanted him to buy a parakeet but he insisted on getting a cock-or-two.

Trooper York said...

If downtownlad were awake he would say that was homophobic.

But hot.

Simon said...

Homophobe.

Sorry, I was chanelling.

Lem said...

Anyway, Starbucks used to have it for their custumers and now they dont. I guess everybody went online.

Lem said...

An example of a common NYT headline.

GOP Platform Revealed, Woman and Children Hardest Hit.

blake said...

Althouse: Reading the New York Times so you don't have to.

Randy said...

How much per week are they paying you to take it?

Lem said...

So, I got to the NYT website right? and wow, it's like the republican thing never happened - the'r right back covering the Obama convention from two weeks ago.

http://www.nytimes.com/

Kirk Parker said...

Ann,

Is your label a typo? It sounds like you were trying to say "nyet".

Lem said...

Althouse: Reading the New York Times so you don't have to.

The NYT is a big community organizer. They help/buy adds on all those forclosures. They are really a life saver ;)

AlphaLiberal said...

Good choice. More Krugman.

Lem said...

Hey where is everybody?

The NYT used to be red meat!

Are we going to let Ann vote for Obama?

Where are you people?

(what do you mean 'you people')

blake said...

I'd guess most people are living life or doing whatever it is people do on Friday nights.

I prefer to do my living Monday afternoons.

UWS guy said...

What do YOU mean you people?

Chip Ahoy said...

Would it be rude to ask how much they paid you?

Athena DePaul said...

Why? Does it come with coupon inserts?

reader_iam said...

Not surprising in the least. And I'm probably one of the very few around here who doesn't, and wouldn't, post that as snark.

vbspurs said...

Is your label a typo? It sounds like you were trying to say "nyet".

LOL!

Chip Ahoy said...

So you really are getting a puppy then? They're really not that hard to house train, you know. I can usually do it in one day. My approach usually works right off -- I first drink a few beers then show them what's expected, and where to go.

reader_iam said...

I swear. Sometimes people around here are tone-deaf to anything more complex than a ditty when it comes to things that are more liturgical than literal. (Or understanding that there's more than one way to understand something, and more than one way for that to be useful.)

Not that there's anything wrong with that.

Lem said...

Today, I signed up for home delivery of the NYT.

If signing up for home delivery of the NYT helps Ann keep her vow of cruel neutrality during this election then I think we should start a petition to nominate Ann to the Supreme Court of these United States of America whatever the party that is ultimately chosen.

I'm Sarah Palin and I approved this massage ;)

Palladian said...

When I see someone reading a physical newspaper, I'm starting to have the same reaction as I do when I see people carrying a CD player Walkman: Oh! How... quaint. I remember when I used to carry one of those back in 1999. Then I sort of feel sorry for them, because I assume they're poor or something.

Maybe it's illegal not to get the New York Times in Madison.

reader_iam said...

You'd really feel sorry for me, then, Palladian. I'm quite deliberately and seriously (seriously!) considering bringing back into use an old touch-tone phone (from the attic) on at least one, if not two, of our land-lines. I'm sick of the touchy electronic ones (and the number of times they've had to be replaced for weather or other elemental reasons). This is not the only example of our stepping back(ward), not by a longshot, even as/if we steadily focus future-ward for the most part. No, not all.

I wouldn't waste time feeling sorry for, vaguely or otherwise. There might be a reason or two having nothing to do with poverty, and sometimes quite the opposite--or, at least, only in search of riches of an entirely different type.

blake said...

Reader's...turning amish?

vbspurs said...

Hey, do you guys remember when phones had that looooong cord, which went all twisty after more than 2 uses?

They were the height of cool, even if in looking back at the puke green colour, it looks horribly dated.

blake said...

It, uh, came twisty, Victoria.

reader_iam said...

Not only do I remember, I have at least three.

In the attic.

reader_iam said...

Not green, though, puke or otherwise.

Rather, a perennially serviceable beige. Which (as indicated by a just-earlier comment of mine) might well turn out to be rather symbolic, if you know what I mean.

Lem said...

Hey, do you guys remember when phones had that looooong cord, which went all twisty after more than 2 uses?

It used to be fun to un-wind it.

Joan said...

reader_iam, I have one of those twisty-corded ancient touchtone phones sitting right beside the monitor on the desk here.

I'm not a Luddite. In a power outage, a cordless phone is useless, but an old-fashioned one works just fine because the phones draw their power from the jack. If your electricity is at all unreliable, it's a good idea to have a corded phone.

We canceled our paper months ago, but we'll start it up again when my mom comes to stay this winter. She enjoys having the paper. We gave it up because the pleasure my husband got from reading the sports section was vastly outweighed by the irritation the rest of it caused.

I miss the comics the most -- the NYT doesn't even have comics! What's the point?!

Lem said...

Do you people (what do you mean you people) remember how to use the dial tones to call long distance for free?

Lem said...

Up until a few years ago dial tone was still used a code to command unmaned machines do something.

sort of like democrats.

vbspurs said...

I miss the comics the most -- the NYT doesn't even have comics! What's the point?!

I remember, as a little kid, jumping on my parent's bed on Sunday morning and waiting for my father to wake up. I would start to twirl his hair, he'd rouse angrily then laugh, kiss me good morning and take out the big Sunday paper.

Each country we were living in provided its own set of Sunday comics, but I remember Hagar, Family Circle, and Andy Capp, best.

He'd read those to me, and we'd laugh our hearts out.

I tell you, those little moments made everything that came afterwards so much easier between us.

To paraphrase Humphrey Bogart, we'll always have Garfield.

Cheers,
Victoria

reader_iam said...

Do you people (what do you mean you people) remember how to use the dial tones to call long distance for free?

You know, I think I have one of those auto tone-dialer thingies, and maybe even two, in the same box in the attic, if I'm recalling correctly, and also if I'm correctly the device and the (more than one) way it could be used. I remember when that device was a tad cutting edge, even, or so I thought ... .

Wow! This is a ride in the (old-fashioned) way-back machine. Fun.

Lem said...

I remember, as a little kid, jumping on my parent's bed on Sunday morning and waiting for my father to wake up.

My father's idea of fun in DR was asking us sons and daughters who would help him fill the cross word.

Imagine the difficulty picking that family affair again once we got here?

But my father would still try anyway.

Joan said...

Victoria, the comics are a nostalgia trip for me, too. I learned to read very young and I swear it was because I wanted to read those comics myself.

But I have been outclassed by the techno-geeks now -- I've never even heard of those dialtone gizmos.

Lem said...

He bought us the spanish britanica so we could help him.

It was some of the best times i remember with my brother and sisters.

vbspurs said...

I love this thread. Night. :)

Lem said...

hey, I went over to Listin Diario and there it is!

http://www.listin.com.do/app/crucigrama.aspx

they have it on line!

Lem said...

Here I am, on the cutting edge of 'comunications' and... I might as well be on the moon.

If political conventions were not hip why would the protesters show up?

Yea there might some people on line, Ann reached 700 plus but - people who need people?

how does that go?

Lem said...

Do bloggers rely on shut-ins?

Are bloggers the Internet's equivalent of shut-ins?

These and many more questions we will explore on .... What's my Affiliation?

Winners will receive...

Bob said...

Did they promise you a weekly column if you signed up?

joewxman said...

OMG...i just did the same thing for my daughter who needs it for school.

this is very frightening! you must have channeled me!

LutherM said...

EXAM QUESTION:
Compare and contrast the following statements by public figures;

"I have taken a vow of cruel neutrality."

"I did not have sexual relations with that woman".

READING the TIMES is an exercise in gathering information, where the tone of the opinion pages and the news articles seem to be similar, if not identical.
But READING is not the same as throwing cash at the Sulzberger trusts.
SUBSCRIBING to the TIMES is similar to an American selling scrap steel to the Japs in 1940 - while it's not giving aid and comfort to the enemy, it's close.

Trumpit said...

P. Rich what a pathetic, nasty piece of work you are. Are you tumerous Bob Novak in disguise? I think that when your brain tumor is properly diagnosed that will explain your obnoxious rant. Have you run over any pedestrians lately? You are obviously a hit and run expert.

bleeper said...

Tree killer!

bleeper said...

Wow - Trumpit is back - and the milk of human kindness still runs in his veins. Well written, Trumpy - look what you referenced in there - disease, hit and run, and you used "tumorous" and "tumor" in the same post. And "rant". Aren't you the big boy now! Your mommy must be very proud. Speaking of nasty, how is your mom? D'oh - now I've gone and slipped into your style of writing. A thousand pardons.

Now back to your little corner of the basement with you, read the labels carefully, and have a quiet time playing with yourself.

rhhardin said...

The rest of the nation is on the go while Althouse lingers over coffee.

EnigmatiCore said...

Rewarding bad behavior generally leads to more bad behavior.

Lest one think the bad behavior is actually good behavior.

rhhardin said...

Tumerous sounds like a line of over-wintering vegetables.

terrance said...

It ain't so surprising if one considers it more of an aesthetic decision rather than a political one.

Larry said...

it's a great paper why wouldn't you want to read it. Because they publish stories that people want to keep secret? That's silly - give me as much info as possible - I'm happy to think for myself.

But for those who prefer their news censored - there is always FOX news.

dr kill said...

I think it might be a pure business decision. AA's tax attorney told her she needs some deductions.

David said...

That is sooo not GREEN. Isn't there a better use for that tree? Think about the little critters that were displaced when it was cut down. And what about the energy to move it to the papermill, and the paper to the printer and eventually your door. By subscribing to the NY Times you are directly contributing to the an increase in greenhouse gases and furthering the destruction of the planet! Shameful! ;-)

Of course, you shouldn't ignore the higher risk of depression or in extreme cases suicide you will place yourself at reading such political nutball yap. And, if it is possible to suffer damage by uncontrollable laughter caused by absurdity you will suffer that too.

Save the planet and protect your sanity. Just say "No" to the New York Times. And the LA Times, Washington Post, and the other fantasy news organizations.

AllenS said...

I'll bet she's been missing the crossword puzzle.

Peter V. Bella said...

Trumpit said...
...Have you run over any pedestrians lately? You are obviously a hit and run expert.


You see there are two types of hit and run drivers the cowardly liberals and the true experts. The first, after drinking two much wine, will hit a pedestrian and keep on going; driving at a sensible speed so as not to attract attention.

The second, the true expert will hit the pedestrian. Then he will back up and go forward a few times to make sure hte pedestrian is dead. He will then put the petal to the metal and get the hell out of there. He will return home, pur a glass of fine brandy, put on some classical music, and enjoy the NYT.

Bissage said...

Today, I signed up for home delivery of the NYT.

Professor, I have it upon good information that paperboys in Madison are of an especially vigorous lot; what with pedalling their bicycles in the snow, and all that entails.

I declare with all confidence that a snowy morning's offer of a respite in the kitchen for a mug of hot cocoa would be accepted with much gratitude.

The rest would be a matter of negotiation, I should think.

Peter V. Bella said...

Larry said...
...Because they publish stories that people want to keep secret?...


She is talking about the NYT, not the National Enquirer.

Ruth Anne Adams said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
MadisonMan said...

There is something comforting about sitting in a comfortable chair and reading a newspaper. It also helps to have coffee nearby. I like being able to scan a paragraph and decide if a story warrants my attention -- that's harder to do with a click.

Reading newspapers is a slow activity. People need to slow down.

Peter V. Bella said...

MadisonMan said...
Reading newspapers is a slow activity. People need to slow down.


That would be nice if the papers had real reportage and interesting articles. Unfortunately, at least in my town, they are poorly written and the articles are dull. I can read the whole Sunday paper in about fifteen minutes; it takes longer to sort the mess out.

Roger J. said...

God, Trumpit--you are genuinely a low life bastard--too bad your parents were permitted to spawn you--You have neither shame nor class.

dick said...

Pinch will be so happy!

Just read in the online edition that they are cutting out a lot of sections of the paper to try to save money. They didn't mentions which parts. I could recommend some op-ed writers they could easily cut with no damage to the community. They could also send Frank Rich back to the theatre section where he could write about something he knows well.

dr kill said...

The New York Times : Reference search for 'the New York Times'

Works by New York Times

1851 The New York Times.
The New York daily newspaper
with a reputation for
accuracy is founded by Henry
J. Raymond (1820-1869) as a conservative alternative to the sensational papers of the day. In 1896 it was purchased by Adolph Ochs, and it maintained its reputation as America's preeminent newspaper throughout the twentieth century.

Elliott A said...

P. Rich...aren't those chapters in the Communist Manifesto?

Al Franken said...

Another surprising fact: Althouse LOVES a woman, Sarah palin, whose church thinks it can "pray away teh gay movement."

How does your son feel about you putting your site meter above his actual life, Althouse?

chickenlittle said...

@Al Franken

It's about time a professional comedian turned up here. Now make us laugh dammit!

Bissage said...

Well, I don’t know much about Sarah Palin’s church but I do know something about the power of prayer to effect positive change in the world.

For example, I prayed to God that Al Franken should be rendered incapable of making an intelligent, gracious or humorous comment.

See?

It worked!

Peter V. Bella said...

Al Franken said...
Another surprising fact: Althouse LOVES a woman, Sarah palin, whose church thinks it can "pray away teh gay movement."

My , my. You people would really have us all conform to one single way of thinking or consign us to re-education camps. I thought this was America, the land of free expression, religion, association, and speech.

former law student said...

or consign us to re-education camps

Funny you should mention that. Mrs. Palin's co-religionist Alan Chambers is president of gay conversion group Exodus International. No camps, but they will pray your gay away.

former law student said...

The academic discount makes home delivery of the NYT a really good deal. I think satellite printing of the NYT started in the 1970s.

chickenlittle said...

FLS said: The academic discount makes home delivery of the NYT a really good deal.

I don't qualify for that tax break. So I'm grateful for whatever tidbits Ann throws out for free.

Ann Althouse said...

I signed up for it mainly because it was only $39 a quarter. It's the deal they offer new students, but they give it to faculty too. So....

I like the visual overview of the big pages. It helps me see things in a different way. I have a very spacial memory, and I had been missing the feeling of seeing the news in the layout of 2 big pages.

Also, I like the puzzles.

vbspurs said...

Can someone please pray my flabby stomach away?

I just spent three hours at the gym, and I'm pooped. A little prayerful intervention would be appreciated.

Cheers,
Victoria

terrance said...

I have a very spacial memory

Is it 'spacial' or 'spatial'?

Ann Althouse said...

spatial

Meade said...

"Also, I like the puzzles."

Good. The first step to recovery begins with admitting one's addiction.

Meade said...

"...I just spent three hours at the gym"

Vic: FWIW, a three hour session is counterproductive. I suggest finding a new trainer. Plus, are you sure it's "flab?" An adult woman without some belly fat is both unattractive and unhealthy. I encourage you to resist current popular notions of feminine beauty.