October 18, 2006

Collect as much bread as you can and slather on half an inch of butter.

That's the strategy kids use to concoct an adequate lunch at a school that's adopted a no-junk-food menu.

14 comments:

Tim said...

I feel so much better knowing British bureaucrats are now taking over the responsibility of feeding English children from their overworked, under-educated, insensitive, lazy parents. Before too long, Her Majesty's Government will complete the task, limiting parents' responsibility to breeding and taxpaying...after applying for a license, of course.

Tim said...

And how much longer before Londonstan's Halal fare becomes standard across old blighty's government schools?

Richard Fagin said...

Cheez-it crackers, pretzels and nachos got me through law school and patent drafting for doctorate physicists from China. The food police, on the other hand, can't understand the difference between cis-fatty acids and trans-fatty acids (although they're sure the latter must be banned). Feed the kids more Cheez-its, I say!

Dave said...

What happens to the kids who play sports? Clearly they have a much much higher daily calorie requirement than the obese kids. When I was a teenager, I regularly consumed 4000 to 5000 calories a day because I worked out so much. I'm sure some share of the was soda, potato chips, french fries. And I recall regularly ordering a large pizza from dominoes with bacon and pineapple (much better than it sounds) and ate the whole thing.

altoids1306 said...

Nanny state par excellence, haha.

The kids will grow up, leave home, and realize that greasy junk food is everywhere, and real, like-mom-made-it food is the true rarity.

In general, telling kids not to do something has the opposite effect.

Anonymous said...

We have the responsibility for ensuring the health of our children.

Said of course not by a parent, but by a local government official.


We want to teach them how to make the right choices for themselves.

By taking away their right to choose.

"You know, if you're going to use your freedom to eat food we don't like, I'm afraid we can't allow you to be free."

Zach said...

The point where these plans founder is palatibility.

When I went off to college, the edible dorm food skewed well away from healthy. I found it was much easier to take a multivitamin than to get a healthy diet of dorm food that was also edible.

It would be interesting to see whether the food actually consumed by students is any healthier under the new regime than previously, and how it compares to the ideal menus that existed at the planning stage.

Robert Burnham said...

When I was at Scout camp, the way to "Be Prepared" when they served us S.O.S. was to snatch a few slices of white bread (the only kind we got), smear them with butter, then dump as much white sugar onto the buttered side as you could.

Fold in half. Eat.

And wash it all down with bug juice -- i.e., Kool-Aid (minus, of course, the Jim Jones additives).

It wasn't a great lunch, and we knew it. But it got you through an afternoon's activities.

Noumenon said...

Just because people evade the rules doesn't mean they failed, if they set norms to let people know what "good" eating really is. Like some people proudly don't wear their seatbelt, but at least they know they're supposed to wear their seatbelt, and maybe they teach their kids that way.

Noumenon said...

Just because people evade the rules doesn't mean they failed, if they set norms to let people know what "good" eating really is. Like some people proudly don't wear their seatbelt, but at least they know they're supposed to wear their seatbelt, and maybe they teach their kids that way.

George said...

Since the start of the school year, the one thing my fourth grader has mentioned over and over and over and over is that she's being taught about how bad fat and sugar are.

Food re-education (or education) has been built into, I think, many of her math and science assignments.

Meanwhile, one of my son's 14-year-old friends glanced at my newspaper one day. He saw a huge ad for Clint Eastwood's new WWII movie, showing the raising of the flag atop Mt. Suribachi.

I said, "I bet that Iwo Jima movie's going to be really good."

His reply?

"What's Iwo Jima?"

dick said...

Noumenon,

I like it! Do what I say, not what I do. Also teaches the kids LLL hypocrisy at an early age before they learn to think for themselves. Win-win situation.

Townleybomb said...

Collect as much bread as you can and slather on half an inch of butter.

Man did that phrase make me hungry.

Reading about "chip butty" changed that fast, though.

Kev said...

Here in suburban Dallas, several wealthier districts are turning down some of their federal funding in favor of still serving foods that students like to eat. In most cases, the districts are making more in income than they are sacrificing by giving up the government funds. I approve.