July 24, 2006

Dreamspace.

Deathspace.

(More here.)

6 comments:

Townleybomb said...

Wow, what a shame-- looks like an amazing piece to explore. I've always been fond of installation art that resembles a carnival ride.

untitled (ludduque): 1985 piece by Slavoj Tyvek consisting of a tilt-a-whirl decorated with taxidermy equipment and a tape deck that blared a loop of a woman chanting "Mirror, Father, Mirror."

Sanjay said...

Nifty. He can build the next one out of straw, then if it has th same problem he can build one out of sticks, then if _that_ has the same problem...

James said...

This accident sounds a lot like what Circus people call a "blowdown." You can read a lot about blowdowns on the Buckles Circus Weblog.


Since blowdowns have been happening since tents were invented, I think this was forseeable, and perhaps preventable. Still, it sounds like a beautiful exhibit to go into--on a calm day.

Richard Lawrence Cohen said...

Faulkner said that the artist should be willing to kill his own grandmother for the sake of his art: "The 'Ode on a Grecian Urn' is worth any number of old ladies." Now that hypothesis has been tested.

Todd said...

Initial reacton: funny how the first article started with the paragraph about the women, then forgot all about them. I note, though, that the second one (as linked by Ann) was put up some five hours earlier.

Richard Dolan said...

Reading about this bizarre accident made me think about the opening scene in Enduring Love -- the out-of-control hot air balloon starting to rise with a young child in it. Several men run after it, trying to hold on to the ropes and pull it down. When the balloon drags them over a ridge, all but one let go. That guy gets pulled up with the balloon and eventually falls to his death, while the balloon comes down without incident several hours later (child unharmed). From that opening scene, Ian McEwen spins a tale of obsession and obsessive behaviour.

The story of the two women and the exploding balloon-like artwork is, if anything, stranger than fiction.