June 9, 2006

"Zarq is blown right to hell."

Daily News Headline.

Stephen Colbert, on last night's show: "al-Zarqawi is al-Kablooey."

Heard any other good lines? (And do these things ever go too far? A man did die...)

26 comments:

The Drill SGT said...

After the attack, our forces found al-Zarqawi in the living room of the house, as well as the kitchen, the dining room and one bedroom.

James Wigderson said...

I went with, "Wowie-Zowie say goodbye to Zarqawi". It's a name that just lends itself to dark humor.

Jennifer said...

The guys at Blackfive had a couple of fun zingers.

"Abu Musab al-Zarqawi is currently backstroking in The Lake of Fire....Wake up with a smile America, Zarqawi ate a 500lb bomb in Baquba yesterday"

""Welcome to Hell, here's your Pineapple..." (reference to Littly Nicky and Hitler's daily rectal pineapple fittings)

TWM said...

Ann,

A man did not die. There was no humanity in him. He was just an evil monster. And, while it is not in the our nature to jump up and down shooting guns in the air to celebrate, quietly celebrating his end seems like a good thing to me.

But, sorry, no good lines.

Ann Althouse said...

Like James, I like the lines that do things with the name. The Daily News article also has "Zarqawi zapped," which I'm sure was widely used. A Z just begs for alliteration.

quietnorth said...

As to your original question, Ann, I think we CAN go to far in enjoying someone's death. Not because Zarqawi didn't "need killin'", but because (and we don't like to admit it to ourselves)hurting other people can feel good and we shouldn't indulge the feeling too much.

R3 said...

Quietnorth hits the nail right on the head.

Azuris said...

"The Meeting Ended Early"

http://powerlineblog.com/archives/014331.php

That made me laugh aloud.

amba said...

I used "Ding dong, the wicked witch is dead" and then discovered that one of the HuffPo huffers and puffers had too -- in the negative.

I am astounded by the left voices saying Zarqawi's killing was a "stunt" and that he was an "invented menace" (link above). How anyone can refuse to rejoice in this achievement just because of who achieved it is beyond me. Proof positive that the left consider some Americans who disagree with them worse enemies than the jihadis who want to kill them. For people who claim to be "reality-based," they have no sense of reality.

Joe said...

Some men deserve to die, and rejoicing at their demise is appropriate. This was one.
One line that sticks in my head is,
"Zarqawi was killed in a safe house... NOT SO SAFE NOW, IS IT BITCH?"

Ann Althouse said...

The grave is a safe house. No one can hurt you there (as people who bury loved ones often say to try to comfort themselves).

37383938393839383938383 said...

What is odd is how everyone claims that somewhere there are people rejoicing, but nowhere have I seen anyone dancing in the street. This is interesting, of course, because when terrorists successfully attack American or ally targets, there sometimes is dancing in the streets. American supporters of the coalition forces have been much more restrained than supporters of terrorists are when terrorists score a victory. A few headlines is not the same as an impromptu festival across the nation. We should put the "rejoicing" in perspective.

The Drill SGT said...

CriticalObserver said...
What is odd is how everyone claims that somewhere there are people rejoicing, but nowhere have I seen anyone dancing in the street.


Here are some yahoo flics of happy people.

I also saw the PM's news conference and saw/heard the reporters, mostly Iraqi break out into jubilant clapping.

I also understand that Arab TV was now playing the video of Z with his weapon malfunction clip. How quickly the press can turn on you. :)

BrianOfAtlanta said...

I've seen pictures of Iraqi police and civilians dancing in the streets. Not huge numbers, but they sure looked enthusiastic.

John said...

The funniest thing I heard was the details on how they found him:

Apparently, they crop dusted the general area where they thought he was with Viagra and waited for the little prick to stand up and show himself!

37383938393839383938383 said...

How can you be sure it was dancing if it was a still photo? Were they wearing square dancing ourfits or tutus? In any event, I was really referring to reaction in the United States, which is why I said "an impromptu festival across the nation". Last I heard, Iraq is not a part of our nation.

TWM said...

Critical,

I probably would have danced, but then my wife would be pissed because I "never dance."

Goesh said...

Zarkman zipped today, gunners get free beer

Jeff said...

Sily people, not reading criticalobservers mind and knowing what he was "refering" to rather than what he said. So, I went thru all the other comments and not one of them said a word about Iraq being a part of the United States. Perhaps you can enlighten us on where that was refered to. So does the United States have any kind of history of dancing in the streets in celebration? Even at the end of WWII in times square, people celebrated, but I dont remember seeing dancing in the streets. I saw the comments about the dancing on other sites, and naturally thought they were refering to Iraq. Silly me, I had no idea they were required to wear special dancing costumes, square dancing clothes or tutus. The things I learn on the internet!

37383938393839383938383 said...

I also saw the PM's news conference and saw/heard the reporters, mostly Iraqi break out into jubilant clapping.

I've seen pictures of Iraqi police and civilians dancing in the streets.


Both these comments refer to Iraqis in Iraq. I was talking about Americans in America. I think it is rather clear that I cannot see the streets in Iraq, being as I live in the United States, and it is rather bizarre for an American to refer to Iraq as "the nation". I was going to say "our nation," but then I thought, who in their right mind would be confused? I am obviously talking about America, as the post is about an American reaction in an American newspaper. In any event, my point was to differentiate the relative restraint of Americans -- many of whom are obviously quite happy -- to the impolite jeers that occur on the Arab street when terrorists do horrible things. Look out your window. Do you see the entire neighborhood erupting in a joyous denunciation of Middle Eastern civilization while burning and trampling on the, for example, Iranian flag? Any Zarq-dummies burning in effigy? Any AK-47s being shot in the air? Anyone taking off work to dance in front of a TV camera? Get the point now? Or must I shout fire in a crowded theater for you to get the freaking point?

Ann Althouse said...

Next time you're with someone and you think you're lost, you can say "Where the Zarqawi?"

37383938393839383938383 said...

That's funny. That may top my GEICO line. Damn.

Goesh said...

laff laff, I think it ties the GEICO line for 1st place

Andrew Foland said...

What does our own military think about Zarqawi?

Conclusion of Brig. Gen. Mark Kimmet(US chief military spokesman):

The Zarqawi PSYOP program is the most successful information campaign to date.


Col Derek Harvey, JCS head of Iraqi Intelligence:

Our own focus on Zarqawi has enlarged his caricature, if you will -- made him more important than he really is, in some ways...The long-term threat is not Zarqawi or religious extremists"


I am sure Zarqawi is a real person, a bad man, and that his death will ease the lives of American servicemen and women, and of Iraqi civilians as well. Nobody (and I mean that- nobody) is saying otherwise, that his death is anything but a net gain. But I think you'd have to be paying very little attention to reality to think that the gain will be significant.

And in that sense, yes, one can celebrate too much.

Patrick said...

Michael Totten had a nice collection. the shortest pithiest was from Will Collier - "Rest in pieces".

http://www.michaeltotten.com/archives/001154.html

alikarimbey said...

Welcome to Hell, al-Zarqawi, this ain't no paradise.