June 11, 2006

"I think Roberts and Alito are both men who are open to arguments, and I would trust them to think long and hard about this."

Conservative opinion on racial balancing in schools is softer than affirmative action opponents might think.

5 comments:

Simon said...

Although I am generally hostile to any form of affirmative action, commentary on these cases by those who are more knowledgable of their specifics than am I has pursuaded me to wait until the briefs are in before commenting.

David said...

The larger problem being ignored is the effect of affirmative action on the production of qualified teachers.

The teaching profession is being degraded by the failure of our schools to maintain quality of education. Add to this the teacher's unions desire for increasing amounts of pay with very little oversight and responsibility and you have the perfect storm of functional illiteracy.

Affirmative action creates a permanent underclass of victims.

John Jenkins said...

The teaching profession has been degraded by the fact that it's no longer subsidized by barriers to entry for women in almost every other profession. That and the fact that it's a government monopoly. Affirmative action doesn't even come in the top 10.

Ann Althouse said...

David: Does your comment relate to the racial balancing issue before the Supreme Court?

PatCA said...

They should leave it to local school officials. Affirmative action started out as a way to remedy black v. white disparity, but "diversity" is way too "diverse" these days to use that model. If Koreans, for example, come to dominate one school, and they're very successful academically, what meaning does racial balance have in that situation? Or at Venice High School, very "diverse" (non-white) and racially balanced, but also rife with gangs and low graduation rates.