November 29, 2005

Senate Democrates have "rebuffed, rebuked and rejected" civil rights and women's groups opposed to Roberts and Alito.

Says AP's David Espo:
Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York, chairman of the Senate Democrats' campaign committee, underscored their political objectives recently to ... representatives of groups opposed to Alito's nomination.

In a private session, Reid and Schumer urged the groups to show restraint when lobbying Democrats from states that Bush won in 2004 - senators from Nebraska, Arkansas, the Dakotas and elsewhere who probably will be the most tempted to support the appointment. Officials who described the session did so on condition of anonymity, citing the confidential nature of the conversation.

Reid, in his first year as party leader, first angered groups opposed to Bush's court nominees last spring. Hoping to head off a showdown over appeals court nominees, he privately told Republicans he would allow confirmation for a few of the appointments that Democrats had long blocked.

[Nan Aron, president of the Alliance For Justice,] made her disagreement plain. "We don't want a deal. We have worked too hard, since we see these nominees as really extreme," she said at the time.
I think it's easy to predict that Alito will be confirmed. I hope the Senate Democrats are smart enough to use the confirmation process to win respect for the liberal version of constitutional interpretation, rather than to portray law as a political struggle and Alito as a candidate they must defeat.

9 comments:

SippicanCottage said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Palladian said...

What's with the fortune cookie comments? It's kind of annoying.

I hope this is a trend among the Democrats: listening to their consciences (provided they have them) rather than the far-left lobby groups that have led them further down the path to unelectability.

XWL said...

"I hope the Senate Democrats are smart enough to use the confirmation process to win respect for the liberal version of constitutional interpretation, rather than to portray law as a political struggle and Alito as a candidate they must defeat."

Maybe I'm just a crazed partisan, but I found that kind of funny. We are talking about Sen. Biden, Sen. Kennedy, Sen. Schumer, and Sen. Durbin here (Sens. Leahy, Kohl and possibly Feinstein might heed your advice).

Based on past performance your optimism would seem misplaced.

If they choose to engage on merit and discuss Judge Alito's nomination on substantive terms then I will be impressed and gratified, but I'm not holding my breath.

The Drill SGT said...

Palladian,

I think it's simple vote counting.

Don't pick fights you can't win in other words.

My view of the Roberts hearings was that they were an embarrassment to the Dems and their staff work. I think Reid recognizes that and thinks that Alito will also be intelligent, moderate and articulate on camera (unlike what he was hoping from Meirs). Beyond that 85 job application, and talking about strip searches of 10 year olds, I don;t think the Dems have much on Alito.

SippicanCottage said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Gabe said...

How often do you get to use the words, "besides strip searches on 10 year olds" in conversation?

wildaboutharrie said...

THAT dissent I actually read (a mini-assignment I gave myself on a thread here a while back) and even I could see why he decided as he did.

Simon Kenton said...

Apopthegms irritate where expatiation charms.

woozyblogger said...

There are two kinds of can't-miss political candidates and we rarely see either of them in real life: pro-choice economic conservatives and pro-life social liberals. Reid and Schumer are determined to open the Democratic Party to those kinds of candidates--see the Casey candidacy in Pennsylvania as a case in point--and get the party off its johnny-one-note obsession with Roe v. Wade. If they succeed, the prospects for a return to the White House and control of the Senate brighten considerably. Gerrymandering has made the House a harder go, but moderating the party along these lines might even put control of the House within signt.