July 11, 2005

Thinking about podcasting.

I'm thinking about podcasting -- both in the sense of wondering about it and in the sense of kind of planning to do it. So I'm trying to get a sense of what works. I've browsed around in the iTunes "audio blogs" category. But really, I haven't run across anything that's the slightest bit appealing.

I'm sure many of the regular radio shows being podcast would be worth listening to, just as radio is worth listening to. But I want to hear something that has some real blogginess going for it. Any ideas?

7 comments:

Mark said...

What probably makes good blogginess is taking the broadcasters out of the loop and leaving the commentary strictly to subject matter experts for a limited, interested audience.

For example, what if three law professors were to do daily commentary on the Senate confirmation hearings for the next Justice. That would be bloggyish, especially if it included a lot of snarky comments about the senators that other broadcasters wouldn’t dare air.

Richard said...

I don't recommend you get into podcasting unless you think you can produce a really superior product, both technically and substantively. I can't see podcasting surviving as it's currently being practiced (i.e., causally thrown together programs) because a potential audience just don't have the time to listen to a dozen (or even half a dozen) casts a day. But the do have time to read hundreds of blog posts. Only the pro-amateur podcasters will prosper after the fad runs its initial course. For all your trouble you'll (not "you" specifically, but anyone) will reach but a fraction of the folks you'll reach with a comparable blog entry. Stick to your knitting and let others flail away at trying to raise a pod audience.

Apologies for sounding so negative, but I've been following the podcast phenomena from day one and these are my impressions and, well, you did ask ;)

Jim H said...

How about podcasting a few of your lectures on favorite topics in constitutional law? Of course, that would be giving away your most highly valued asset. Is it even permitted?

Chris said...

I think podcasting is just like blogging. It is the few items in the news or your life that you find interesting with your own commentary and opinions added. Podcasting is the same with you being able to add your own expertise to postworthy items that you find in the news or just around town. The only drawback I see is, just how long do you make a podcast? Do you do it daily or weekly?

Ann Althouse said...

I agree that podcasting isn't going to be as good as blogging -- because podcasts are not searchable and it takes longer to listen than to read. But it's different and could be a fun change of pace for some of us bloggers. It's a chance to produce dialogues, for one thing. And I think it's an area where lawprofs have something special to offer.

bill said...

Are you familiar with "Dinner for Five" on the IFC channel? )www.dinnerforfive.com)

I think too many people are trying to do radio, and radio isn't easy. To me, a casual conversation on a variety of topics would sound more like your blog. Even if focused solely on law, it doesn't have to be the typical interview or debate.

Also, more podcasts need to take advantage of editing, rather than posting raw feeds.

Tonya said...

I sometimes watch Dinner for Five on cable. It's on Bravo, right? It's hosted by Jon Favreau and he and about 4 other people talk over dinner. The show is edited and can be very good at times -- depends on who participates and what kind of group dynamic gets going. The actors do tend to be more revealing with each other than they typically are when interviewed by a journalist. Another thing I've noticed about the show is that the female guest (and there is usually only one female guest) tends to talk much less than the male guests. I'm not sure what's going on here -- perhaps her statements are being edited out or she just isn't saying that much.